1

Take a look at the following code when it's rendered in Chrome. It will show two slides, a red square facing you and a blue square facing up:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <meta charset="utf-8" />

  <!-- disable zooming -->
  <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1.0, user-scalable=0" />

    <style media="screen">

    .container {
      width: 200px;
      height: 200px;
      position: relative;
      margin: 0 auto 40px;
      border: 1px solid #CCC;
      -webkit-perspective: 1000px;
    }

    #cube {
      width: 100%;
      height: 100%;
      position: absolute;
      -webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d;
      -webkit-transition: -webkit-transform 1s;
    }

    #cube figure {
      display: block;
      position: absolute;
      width: 196px;
      height: 196px;
      border: 2px solid black;
    }

    #cube.panels-backface-invisible figure {
      -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
    }

    #cube .front  { background: hsla(   0, 100%, 50%, 0.7 ); }
    #cube .top    { background: hsla( 240, 100%, 50%, 0.7 ); }

    #cube .front  {
      -webkit-transform: translateZ( 100px );
    }
    #cube .top {
      -webkit-transform: rotateX(   90deg ) translateZ( 100px );
    }


  </style>

</head>
<body>


  <section class="container">
    <div id="cube" class="show-front">
      <figure class="front">1</figure>
      <figure class="top">5</figure>
    </div>
  </section>

</body>
</html>

How come when I add the following CSS rule:

#cube figure.top {height:300px;}

The blue square "moves down"? As I increase the height, the blue square moves down even more. Why does this happen? I was expecting the blue square to get "longer" by protruding towards me.

Additional Notes

Here's the same code, but this time, i rotated the two slides so you can see what I mean from the side:

http://jsfiddle.net/TLcq9/

Notice the blue is on top, and the red is on the right hand side. If you add the #cube figure.top{height:300px;}, the blue square moves down. Some people below says it is the "illusion" of moving down. But I don't understand how this illusion is achieved. Spatially, it I don't understand. What is the intuitive way to make the blue square stay at the top, but also stretch in height such that it protrudes beyond the top of the red square?

  • Thanks for answers everyone, but I'm still having a hard time understanding why extending the figure.top gives the illusion of going down. I'm expecting it to stay in place, while one end stretches away from me, and another end stretches towards me. – John Aug 2 '13 at 4:00
4

Lets say we have a 2d box and we are viewing it(side view)

The Blue line is the box

 #cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 1deg ) translateZ( 1px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:100px;}

We will try to rotate the blue box 20deg (the rotation is going to the left side) enter image description here

#cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 20deg ) translateZ( 1px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:100px;}

Now if we rotate the blue box 90deg our height will become width and the width will be become height (the rotation is going to the left side)

enter image description here

 #cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 90deg ) translateZ( 1px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:100px;}

Now lets see if our height become width (As you can see when we increase the height to 200px its become wider, so it means our height is already a width)

enter image description here

 #cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 90deg ) translateZ( 1px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:200px;}

Now we need to pull up the blue box using the translateZ

enter image description here

    #cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 90deg ) translateZ( 100px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:200px;}

So now what will happen if we change the height to 300px?

  • Our blue box will become more wider
  • Our invisible box will increase 50px (Yeah that's right we have a invisible box)
  • The invisible box push down the blue box by 50px.

enter image description here

 #cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 90deg ) translateZ( 100px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:300px;}

Because of that we need to pull up the blue box again using the translateZ by 50px enter image description here

#cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 90deg ) translateZ( 150px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:300px;}

Extra: Lets change the width and see what happen enter image description here

#cube .top {
  -webkit-transform: rotateX( 90deg ) translateZ( 150px );
}
#cube figure.top {height:300px;width:900px;}

That's is my explanation :D

Sorry for my English.

  • Thanks, I still don't really understand how this illusion is working. I tried to add more notes to my question to explain my confusion. Can you help me understand? – John Aug 2 '13 at 4:12
0

It looks like when you change the height, the figure is coming out of the screen more. So the greater the height, the lower it gets because it is coming out of the screen.

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