40

I have div for preview box

HTML:

<div class="preview-content">PREVIEW</div>

CSS:

.preview-content {
    background: url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAQAAAAECAYAAACp8Z5+AAAAGklEQVQIW2NkYGD4D8SMQAwGcAY2AbBKDBUAVuYCBQPd34sAAAAASUVORK5CYII=) repeat;
    width: 100%;
    min-height: 300px;
    max-height: 300px;
    line-height: 300px;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
     font-size: 2em;
}

Q: how to add diagonal lines to div background like in picture

note: with CSS only if possible

preview

Thank you in advance

  • Do you just want to add two lines? – cdMinix Aug 2 '13 at 8:49
  • yes, only 2 like in picture – Ing. Michal Hudak Aug 2 '13 at 8:53
25

You can do it something like this:

<style>
    .background {
        background-color: #BCBCBC;
        width: 100px;
        height: 50px;
        padding: 0; 
        margin: 0
    }
    .line1 {
        width: 112px;
        height: 47px;
        border-bottom: 1px solid red;
        -webkit-transform:
            translateY(-20px)
            translateX(5px)
            rotate(27deg); 
        position: absolute;
        /* top: -20px; */
    }
    .line2 {
        width: 112px;
        height: 47px;
        border-bottom: 1px solid green;
        -webkit-transform:
            translateY(20px)
            translateX(5px)
            rotate(-26deg);
        position: absolute;
        top: -33px;
        left: -13px;
    }
</style>
<div class="background">
    <div class="line1"></div>
    <div class="line2"></div>
</div>

Here is a jsfiddle.

Improved version of answer for your purpose.

  • 2
    width of block is not permanent, notice width: 100%; – Ing. Michal Hudak Aug 2 '13 at 11:41
  • 2
    With -webkit-transform will work only on WebKit based browsers. I suggest to specify the standard W3C transform rule as first step, then specify other browser-specific rule, such -webkit-transform, -moz-transform, -ms-transform, -o-transform. – T-moty Nov 3 '14 at 14:04
84

Almost perfect solution, that automatically scales to dimensions of an element would be usage of CSS3 linear-gradient connected with calc() as shown below. Main drawback is of course compatibility. Code below works in Firefox 25 and Explorer 10 and 11, but in Chrome (I've tested v30 and v32 dev) there are some subtle problems with lines disappearing if they are too narrow. Moreover disappearing depends on the box dimensions – style below works for div { width: 100px; height: 100px}, but fails for div { width: 200px; height: 200px} for which in my tests 0.8px in calculations needs to be replaced with at least 1.1048507095px for diagonals to be shown and even then line rendering quality is quite poor. Let's hope this Chrome bug will be solved soon.

.crossed {
     background: 
         linear-gradient(to top left,
             rgba(0,0,0,0) 0%,
             rgba(0,0,0,0) calc(50% - 0.8px),
             rgba(0,0,0,1) 50%,
             rgba(0,0,0,0) calc(50% + 0.8px),
             rgba(0,0,0,0) 100%),
         linear-gradient(to top right,
             rgba(0,0,0,0) 0%,
             rgba(0,0,0,0) calc(50% - 0.8px),
             rgba(0,0,0,1) 50%,
             rgba(0,0,0,0) calc(50% + 0.8px),
             rgba(0,0,0,0) 100%);
}
<textarea class="crossed"></textarea>

  • 4
    Best solution for CSS3 (y) – Sanket Sahu Mar 10 '14 at 10:44
  • 3
    Damn. You're good. – sidonaldson Jun 12 '14 at 15:22
  • 10
    Here's a jsfiddle in case you want to play with this solution: jsfiddle.net/zaxy6pmn – danvk Nov 30 '14 at 2:26
  • Looks mostly OK in Chrome 39, but the lower-right "arm" has an extra pixel. Depending on what's around it this may not be noticeable except at very small sizes, e.g. 5x5 pixels. – mrec Jan 19 '15 at 18:52
  • 1
    Nice solution. Updated it to background repeat: jsfiddle.net/6q4m4ww8 My issue now is how to add a distance between x-es – Daniel Ursu May 16 '17 at 6:22
18

You can use SVG to draw the lines.

.diag {
    background: url("data:image/svg+xml;utf8,<svg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' version='1.1' preserveAspectRatio='none' viewBox='0 0 100 100'><path d='M1 0 L0 1 L99 100 L100 99' fill='black' /><path d='M0 99 L99 0 L100 1 L1 100' fill='black' /></svg>");
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-position:center center;
    background-size: 100% 100%, auto;
}
<div class="diag" style="width: 300px; height: 100px;"></div>

Have a play here: http://jsfiddle.net/tyw7vkvm

  • 1
    Nice! Was looking for a solution to emulate a "crossed out" price and this worked great with a few minor alterations jsfiddle.net/tyw7vkvm/636 👍 – Mavelo Aug 26 '18 at 17:14
14

All other answers to this 3-year old question require CSS3 (or SVG). However, it can also be done with nothing but lame old CSS2:

.crossed {
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
}

.crossed:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    top: 1px;
    bottom: 1px;
    border-width: 149px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: black white;
}

.crossed:after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    left: 1px;
    right: 1px;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    border-width: 149px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: white transparent;
}
<div class='crossed'></div>

Explanation, as requested:

Rather than actually drawing diagonal lines, it occurred to me we can instead color the so-called negative space triangles adjacent to where we want to see these lines. The trick I came up with to accomplish this exploits the fact that multi-colored CSS borders are bevelled diagonally:

.borders {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: black;
    border-width: 40px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: red blue green yellow;
}
<div class='borders'></div>

To make things fit the way we want, we choose an inner rectangle with dimensions 0 and LINE_THICKNESS pixels, and another one with those dimensions reversed:

.r1 { width: 10px;
      height: 0;
      border-width: 40px;
      border-style: solid;
      border-color: red blue;
      margin-bottom: 10px; }
.r2 { width: 0;
      height: 10px;
      border-width: 40px;
      border-style: solid;
      border-color: blue transparent; }
<div class='r1'></div><div class='r2'></div>

Finally, use the :before and :after pseudo-selectors and position relative/absolute as a neat way to insert the borders of both of the above rectangles on top of each other into your HTML element of choice, to produce a diagonal cross. Note that results probably look best with a thin LINE_THICKNESS value, such as 1px.

  • Haha well, I guess an explanation would be great here, because that looks like some weird voodoo magic at first. – Daniel Z. Apr 16 '17 at 14:16
  • 1
    @DanielZiegler Done. Let me know if further clarification is needed. – Will Apr 16 '17 at 17:54
  • Awesome explanation and in fact a genius solution. +1 – Daniel Z. Apr 16 '17 at 18:05
  • 1
    Yeah, nice trick, but ignores one assumption of original question: width: 100% of div to be crossed ;) Though, to be fair, guessing from accepted answer, looks like it wasn't hard requirement. – RobertT May 16 '17 at 11:59
5

Please check the following.

<canvas id="myCanvas" width="200" height="100"></canvas>
<div id="mydiv"></div>

JS:

var c = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
var ctx = c.getContext("2d");
ctx.strokeStyle="red";
ctx.moveTo(0,100);
ctx.lineTo(200,0);
ctx.stroke();
ctx.moveTo(0,0);
ctx.lineTo(200,100);
ctx.stroke();

CSS:

html, body { 
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

#myCanvas {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  width: 200px;
  height: 100px;
}

#mydiv {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0px;
  right: 0;
  height: 102px;
  width: 202px;
  background: rgba(255,255,255,0);
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
}

jsfiddle

  • 1
    notice that width is 100%, width: 100%; so box will be floating, so I can't write coordinates permanent into js – Ing. Michal Hudak Aug 2 '13 at 11:40
2

you can use a CSS3 transform Property:

div
{
transform:rotate(Xdeg);
-ms-transform:rotate(Xdeg); /* IE 9 */
-webkit-transform:rotate(Xdeg); /* Safari and Chrome */
}

Xdeg = your value

For example...

You can make more div and use a z-index property. So,make a div with line, and rotate it.

0

If you'd like the cross to be partially transparent, the naive approach would be to make linear-gradient colors semi-transparent. But that doesn't work out good due to the alpha blending at the intersection, producing a differently colored diamond. The solution to this is to leave the colors solid but add transparency to the gradient container instead:

.cross {
  position: relative;
}
.cross::after {
  pointer-events: none;
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; right: 0;
}

.cross1::after {
  background:
    linear-gradient(to top left, transparent 45%, rgba(255,0,0,0.35) 46%, rgba(255,0,0,0.35) 54%, transparent 55%),
    linear-gradient(to top right, transparent 45%, rgba(255,0,0,0.35) 46%, rgba(255,0,0,0.35) 54%, transparent 55%);
}

.cross2::after {
  background:
    linear-gradient(to top left, transparent 45%, rgb(255,0,0) 46%, rgb(255,0,0) 54%, transparent 55%),
    linear-gradient(to top right, transparent 45%, rgb(255,0,0) 46%, rgb(255,0,0) 54%, transparent 55%);
  opacity: 0.35;
}

div { width: 180px; text-align: justify; display: inline-block; margin: 20px; }
<div class="cross cross1">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam et dui imperdiet, dapibus augue quis, molestie libero. Cras nisi leo, sollicitudin nec eros vel, finibus laoreet nulla. Ut sit amet leo dui. Praesent rutrum rhoncus mauris ac ornare. Donec in accumsan turpis, pharetra eleifend lorem. Ut vitae aliquet mi, id cursus purus.</div>

<div class="cross cross2">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam et dui imperdiet, dapibus augue quis, molestie libero. Cras nisi leo, sollicitudin nec eros vel, finibus laoreet nulla. Ut sit amet leo dui. Praesent rutrum rhoncus mauris ac ornare. Donec in accumsan turpis, pharetra eleifend lorem. Ut vitae aliquet mi, id cursus purus.</div>

-2

.borders {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: black;
    border-width: 40px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: red blue green yellow;
}
<div class='borders'></div>

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