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Is there a way to specify search and replace range using the current line as a reference? I can specify range using explicit line numbers like

:5,15s/foo/bar/g

to do the search and replace on only lines 5 to 15. How to specify a range like "from the current line to 10 lines below (or above) the current line"?

5
  • 1
    have you checked :h range ?
    – Kent
    Aug 2, 2013 at 15:18
  • 1
    @Kent: In my recent Vim, that goes to the range() documentation, unfortunately. But :range will do the trick. Aug 2, 2013 at 15:21
  • @IngoKarkat interesting i have 7.3.1287. :h range brings me there. (same as :h :range)
    – Kent
    Aug 2, 2013 at 16:35
  • @Kent: Really interesting. For me, it seems to depend on Windows (range() first) vs. Linux (:range first), but I don't have identical versions. I'll make a note to investigate further. Aug 2, 2013 at 20:06
  • 1
    Vim's search and replace feature is powerful. Here you can get what you asked for vim.fandom.com/wiki/Search_and_replace Apr 26, 2021 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

132

You can use . for the current position, and .+10 for 10 lines down:

:.,.+10s/foo/bar/g

Some other useful ranges:

  • % for the whole file. Example: :%s/foo/bar/g.
  • '<,'> for the lines of visually selected block. This might get you more than you want of the visual selection starts or ends in the middle of a line. The whole line is included.
  • 'a,'b from mark a to mark b.
  • .,$ from the current line to the end of the file.
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  • 26
    For those counting characters, neither . is required in that expression. Thus, :,+10s/foo/bar/g is equivalent.
    – ravron
    Aug 2, 2013 at 16:59
28

:help :range gives you all the details; you can do quite sophisticated things, e.g. :'a;/pat1/-1.

For ranges starting from the current line, a neat trick is to start command-line mode by prefixing the : with a count: E.g. 5: turns into :.,.+4.

Protip: Learn how to look up commands and navigate the built-in :help; it is comprehensive and offers many tips. You won't learn Vim as fast as other editors, but if you commit to continuous learning, it'll prove a very powerful and efficient editor.

1
  • 5
    +1 for that 5: trick. That's slick. It can be found at :help N:, or just under :help :range if you're willing to scroll a bit more.
    – ravron
    Aug 2, 2013 at 17:06

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