15

I am trying to make a numpy array that looks like this:

[a b c       ]
[  a b c     ]
[    a b c   ]
[      a b c ] 

So this involves updating the main diagonal and the two diagonals above it.

What would be an efficient way of doing this?

22

You can use np.indices to get the indices of your array and then assign the values where you want.

a = np.zeros((5,10))
i,j = np.indices(a.shape)

i,j are the line and column indices, respectively.

a[i==j] = 1.
a[i==j-1] = 2.
a[i==j-2] = 3.

will result in:

array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])
1
  • 3
    This is a great solution. Among all the solutions suggested, it has a good balance between simplicity and performance. I wish numpy's diag function can let me specify which super/sub diagonal I want to update and then return a view of the diagonal. This would then be the most intuitive and fastest. Aug 8 '13 at 14:58
8

This is an example of a Toeplitz matrix - you can construct it using scipy.linalg.toeplitz:

import numpy as np
from scipy.linalg import toeplitz

first_row = np.array([1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 0])
first_col = np.array([1, 0, 0, 0])

print(toeplitz(first_col, first_row))
# [[1 2 3 0 0 0]
#  [0 1 2 3 0 0]
#  [0 0 1 2 3 0]
#  [0 0 0 1 2 3]]
4
import numpy as np

def using_tile_and_stride():
    arr = np.tile(np.array([10,20,30,0,0,0], dtype='float'), (4,1))
    row_stride, col_stride = arr.strides
    arr.strides = row_stride-col_stride, col_stride
    return arr

In [108]: using_tile_and_stride()
Out[108]: 
array([[ 10.,  20.,  30.,   0.,   0.,   0.],
       [  0.,  10.,  20.,  30.,   0.,   0.],
       [  0.,   0.,  10.,  20.,  30.,   0.],
       [  0.,   0.,   0.,  10.,  20.,  30.]])

Other, slower alternatives include:

import numpy as np

import numpy.lib.stride_tricks as stride

def using_put():
    arr = np.zeros((4,6), dtype='float')
    a, b, c = 10, 20, 30
    nrows, ncols = arr.shape
    ind = (np.arange(3) + np.arange(0,(ncols+1)*nrows,ncols+1)[:,np.newaxis]).ravel()
    arr.put(ind, [a, b, c])
    return arr

def using_strides():
    return np.flipud(stride.as_strided(
        np.array([0, 0, 0, 10, 20, 30, 0, 0, 0], dtype='float'), 
        shape=(4, 6), strides = (8, 8)))

If you use using_tile_and_stride, note that the array is only appropriate for read-only purposes. Otherwise, if you were to try to modify the array, you might be surprised when multiple array locations change simultaneously:

In [32]: arr = using_tile_and_stride()

In [33]: arr[0, -1] = 100

In [34]: arr
Out[34]: 
array([[  10.,   20.,   30.,    0.,  100.],
       [ 100.,   10.,   20.,   30.,    0.],
       [   0.,    0.,   10.,   20.,   30.],
       [  30.,    0.,    0.,   10.,   20.]])

You could work around this by returning np.ascontiguousarray(arr) instead of just arr, but then using_tile_and_stride would be slower than using_put. So if you intend to modify the array, using_put would be a better choice.

1

I can't comment yet, but I want to bump that ali_m's answer is by far the most efficient as scipy takes care of things for you.

For example, with a matrix of size n,m = 1200, repeatedly adding np.diag() calls takes ~6.14s, Saullo G. P. Castro's answer takes ~7.7s, and scipy.linalg.toeplitz(np.arange(N), np.arange(N)) takes 1.57ms.

0

Using my answer to this question: changing the values of the diagonal of a matrix in numpy , you can do some tricky slicing to get a view of each diagonal, then do the assignment. In this case it would just be:

import numpy as np
A = np.zeros((4,6))
# main diagonal
A.flat[:A.shape[1]**2:A.shape[1]+1] = a
# first superdiagonal
A.flat[1:max(0,A.shape[1]-1)*A.shape[1]:A.shape[1]+1] = b
# second superdiagonal
A.flat[2:max(0,A.shape[1]-2)*A.shape[1]:A.shape[1]+1] = c
0

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