14

The input file: a.txt

aaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbb
cccccccccccc

The python code:

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line

The problem:

[root@a1 0]# python read_lines.wsgi
aaaaaaaaaaaa

bbbbbbbbbbb

cccccccccccc

as you can see the output has extra line between each item.

How to prevent this?

16

print appends a newline, and the input lines already end with a newline.

A standard solution is to output the input lines verbatim:

import sys

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        sys.stdout.write(line)

PS: For Python 3 (or Python 2 with the print function), abarnert's print(…, end='') solution is the simplest one.

  • The OP is clearly using Python 2, and I'm not sure suggesting print_function for 2.x users is always a good idea. And using print's magic soft space is probably a bad idea if you don't first learn what it means and how it works. Which means your explicit write may be the best answer (which is why I upvoted your answer, and think the OP was right to accept it). – abarnert Aug 5 '13 at 18:06
8

As the other answers explain, each line has a newline; when you print a bare string, it adds a line at the end. There are two ways around this; everything else is a variation on the same two ideas.


First, you can strip the newlines as you read them:

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line.rstrip()

This will strip any other trailing whitespace, like spaces or tabs, as well as the newline. Usually you don't care about this. If you do, you probably want to use universal newline mode, and strip off the newlines:

with open("a.txt", "rU") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line.rstrip('\n')

However, if you know the text file will be, say, a Windows-newline file, or a native-to-whichever-platform-I'm-running-on-right-now-newline file, you can strip the appropriate endings explicitly:

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line.rstrip('\r\n')

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line.rstrip(os.linesep)

The other way to do it is to leave the original newline, and just avoid printing an extra one. While you can do this by writing to sys.stdout with sys.stdout.write(line), you can also do it from print itself.

If you just add a comma to the end of the print statement, instead of printing a newline, it adds a "smart space". Exactly what that means is a bit tricky, but the idea is supposed to be that it adds a space when it should, and nothing when it shouldn't. Like most DWIM algorithms, it doesn't always get things right—but in this case, it does:

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line,

Of course we're now assuming that the file's newlines match your terminal's—if you try this with, say, classic Mac files on a Unix terminal, you'll end up with each line printing over the last one. Again, you can get around that by using universal newlines.

Anyway, you can avoid the DWIM magic of smart space by using the print function instead of the print statement. In Python 2.x, you get this by using a __future__ declaration:

from __future__ import print_function
with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print(line, end='')

Or you can use a third-party wrapper library like six, if you prefer.

  • stripping \r is useless because you have opened the file in text mode: the \r char is removed before you have to strip it. Useful only with python 2 and binary mode for text files (not compatible with python 3) – Jean-François Fabre Sep 2 '17 at 19:39
2

What happens is that each line as a newline at the end, and print statement in python also adds a newline. You can strip the newlines:

with open("a.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        print line.strip()
  • strip() removes leading white spaces too, so this solution fails to correctly print the input file when it contains lines that start with spaces. You actually want rstrip(). Even rstrip() is not so good: it removes newlines (which is good), but also trailing spaces, which modifies the lines of the input file in some possible unwanted way, so even an rstrip() version does not fully do what is needed. – Eric O Lebigot Aug 3 '13 at 2:16
1

You could also try the splitlines() function, it strips automatically:

f = open('a.txt').read()
for l in f.splitlines():
    print l
  • 1
    While this correctly handles the various newline convention of multiple operating systems, in both Python 2 and Python 3 this solution can take a lot of memory: not only is the whole file read in memory, but a copy is made through the list of its lines. So, this is a method that works, but only for files that are not too large. Note that memory would ultimately be freed if this solution used a with, like in some other answers. – Eric O Lebigot Aug 3 '13 at 2:07
  • 1
    @EOL: The with won't affect freeing memory. Whether you close the file or not, the giant f string is live for exactly the same amount of time either way. (Of course it's still a good idea to not leak file handles. It's just not relevant to GC'ing f, or f.splitlines.) – abarnert Aug 5 '13 at 18:04
  • @abarnert: You're right. I'm not sure why I wrote that memory would be freed with with (the involved memory amount is indeed negligible). – Eric O Lebigot Aug 6 '13 at 9:19
0

It is not adding a newline, but each scanned line from your file has a trailing one.

Try:

with open ("a.txt") as f:
    for line in (x.rstrip ('\n') for x in f):
        print line
  • This fails on Windows (or Mac OS before OS X), because the newline character is not \n. – Eric O Lebigot Aug 3 '13 at 2:02
  • 1
    This also fails if the file a.txt does not exist. – Hyperboreus Aug 3 '13 at 2:04
  • 1
    @EOL AFAIK, and I might be wrong, files opened in text-mode in python have all their line-endings implicitely converted to '\n'. – Hyperboreus Aug 3 '13 at 2:06
  • You can simply for line in f: print(line.rstrip()), or you can use os.linesep if you want to be specific. – Burhan Khalid Aug 3 '13 at 2:06
  • 1
    @Hyperboreus: Only if you read the file in rU mode. – Blender Aug 3 '13 at 2:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy