46

I am new to powershell. I have a config XML which reads as -

<xml>
    <Section name="BackendStatus">
        <BEName BE="crust" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="pizza" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="pie" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="bread" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="Kulcha" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="kulfi" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="cheese" Status="1" />
    </Section>
</xml>

I need to parse each element in BEName to check Status. How can this be done using PowerShell?

87

First step is to load your xml string into an XmlDocument, using powershell's unique ability to cast strings to [xml]

$doc = [xml]@'
<xml>
    <Section name="BackendStatus">
        <BEName BE="crust" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="pizza" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="pie" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="bread" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="Kulcha" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="kulfi" Status="1" />
        <BEName BE="cheese" Status="1" />
    </Section>
</xml>
'@

Powershell makes it really easy to parse xml with the dot notation. This statement will produce a sequence of XmlElements for your BEName elements:

$doc.xml.Section.BEName

Then you can pipe these objects into the where-object cmdlet to filter down the results. You can use ? as a shortcut for where

$doc.xml.Section.BEName | ? { $_.Status -eq 1 }

The expression inside the braces will be evaluated for each XmlElement in the pipeline, and only those that have a Status of 1 will be returned. The $_ operator refers to the current object in the pipeline (an XmlElement).

If you need to do something for every object in your pipeline, you can pipe the objects into the foreach-object cmdlet, which executes a block for every object in the pipeline. % is a shortcut for foreach:

$doc.xml.Section.BEName | ? { $_.Status -eq 1 } | % { $_.BE + " is delicious" }

Powershell is great at this stuff. It's really easy to assemble pipelines of objects, filter pipelines, and do operations on each object in the pipeline.

1
  • 3
    Be aware that getting the tags via dot-walking will return null objects for any parent tags containing no children. E.g. $doc.xml.Section.BEName.BEChild.Length will be 7 for the above example, despite no BEChild tags being defined. This won't be an issue if you're filtering, but you will need to safely skip these null objects if you are iterating via ForEach-Object or similar.
    – Tydaeus
    Nov 13 '18 at 22:03
29

If you want to start with a file you can do this

[xml]$cn = Get-Content config.xml
$cn.xml.Section.BEName

Use PowerShell to Parse an XML File

1
  • 1
    Link is broken :-( Jun 17 '20 at 20:59
14
[xml]$xmlfile = '<xml> <Section name="BackendStatus"> <BEName BE="crust" Status="1" /> <BEName BE="pizza" Status="1" /> <BEName BE="pie" Status="1" /> <BEName BE="bread" Status="1" /> <BEName BE="Kulcha" Status="1" /> <BEName BE="kulfi" Status="1" /> <BEName BE="cheese" Status="1" /> </Section> </xml>'

foreach ($bename in $xmlfile.xml.Section.BEName) {
    if($bename.Status -eq 1){
        #Do something
    }
}
0

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