4

I get this output when I compile the code below in a 64 bit Intel in Xcode.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<limits.h>

int main(void)
{
  /* declare some integer variables */
  long a = LONG_MAX;
  long b = 2L;
  long c = 3L;

  /* declare some floating-point variables */
  double d = 4.0;
  double e = 5.0;
  double f = 6.0;

  printf("A variable of type long occupies %d bytes.", sizeof(long));
  printf("\nHere are the addresses of some variables of type long:");
  printf("\nThe address of a is: %p  The address of b is: %p", &a, &b);
  printf("\nThe address of c is: %p", &c);
  printf("\nThe address of a-b is: %ld\nvalue of a is %ld\nValue of b is %ld\nsize of pointer %ld ", (&a-&c),a,b,sizeof(&a));
  printf("\n\nA variable of type double occupies %d bytes.", sizeof(double));
  printf("\nHere are the addresses of some variables of type double:");
  printf("\nThe address of d is: %p  The address of e is: %p", &d, &e);
  printf("\nThe address of f is: %p\n", &f);

    printf("\n size long - %d", sizeof(a));
  return 0;
}
A variable of type long occupies 8 bytes.

Here are the addresses of some variables of type long:

The address of a is: 0x7fff5fbff880 
The address of b is: 0x7fff5fbff878 
The address of c is: 0x7fff5fbff870 
The address of a-b is: 2

value of a is 9223372036854775807 
Value of b is 2 
size of pointer 8 

A variable of type double occupies 8 bytes.

Here are the addresses of some variables of type double:

The address of d is: 0x7fff5fbff868 
The address of e is: 0x7fff5fbff860 
The address of f is: 0x7fff5fbff858 
size long - 8

What is strange to me is that the difference between the address for a and b is only 2. I would expect it to have been 8, which would match the number of bytes for a long. Does anyone know a reason why this would be?


I did have a typo in the code where I subtracted &a-&c, but that really does not pertain to my question. My question is why is there only a difference of 2 bytes from variable a's address to variable b's address, when the long is 8 bytes long and I would expect to see a difference of 8?

11
  • 3
    "...why is there only a difference of 2 bytes..." It's not a difference of 2 bytes, it's a difference of 2, plain and simple. The "units" of the difference correspond to the declared pointer type. – Hot Licks Aug 4 '13 at 3:45
  • 1
    @jib, I would suggest you edit the question and remove the pointer arithmetic so that people will focus on your actual question, which has nothing to do with the pointer arithmetic. – Firoze Lafeer Aug 4 '13 at 3:53
  • 1
    @FirozeLafeer the question is about the pointer arithmetic: given the value of &a and &b, why is the value of the expression &a-&b not the same as the numeric difference of the two values? – SheetJS Aug 4 '13 at 3:56
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    @nirk, the question title was edited by someone else. The original intention of the question seems to have been why is one long at 0x7fff5fbff880 and the next is at 0x7fff5fbff878 (the OP forgot these hex addresses are, in fact, 8 bytes apart). See the op's comments above and his/her comments to the provided answers. – Firoze Lafeer Aug 4 '13 at 3:59
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    @FirozeLafeer you are right with your comment about the question's intent. – ControlAltDelete Aug 4 '13 at 11:51
4

The difference is in units of sizeof(long). To force it to take the difference in terms of bytes, you should cast both pointers first:

((char *)&a-(char *)&b)

In this way, the difference is in units of sizeof(char) which is the number of bytes

5
  • I guess what I am more curious about is by looking at the address there is only a difference of two between a and b when a is 8 bytes long? – ControlAltDelete Aug 4 '13 at 3:39
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    @Jib right the difference is measured in units of sizeof(long). Your code says "a-b" but you are actually taking the difference of "a" and "c" (which would give you 2). Try making the difference (&a-&b) and you will see a different answer – SheetJS Aug 4 '13 at 3:46
  • Yep it was a dumb typo, but could you tell me why the address of a is 0x7fff5fbff880 and b is only two bytes away at 0x7fff5fbff878 vs 0x7fff5fbff872? I guess when I compile for a 32 bit machine the difference between the address is in line with the number of bytes the variable is – ControlAltDelete Aug 4 '13 at 3:51
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    @Jib its hexadecimal, and 0x7fff5fbff880 - 0x7fff5fbff878 = 8 (you can test it in JS or python or some other scripting language if you don't wish to write a test C program) – SheetJS Aug 4 '13 at 3:55
  • Yep i just converted it over and realized that. Thanks – ControlAltDelete Aug 4 '13 at 4:04
7

Pointer arithmetic is based on the size of the type it points to not in bytes, this reference on Pointer Arithmetic covers the topic quite well, you also have a typo:

(&a-&c)

you are actually subtracting c from a.

This is also undefined behavior since pointer subtraction is only defined if the pointers point to the same array, see section 6.5.6/9 from the C11 draft standard:

[...] When two pointers are subtracted, both shall point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object;[...]

Also section 6.5.6/8 is also relevant:

[...] If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined. [...]

2
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    I guess what I am more curious about is by looking at the address there is only a difference of two between a and b when a is 8 bytes long? – ControlAltDelete Aug 4 '13 at 3:36
  • @Jib Well if you subtracted &a and &b the difference would have been 1, in your specific case. Which if they pointed to the same array makes sense since there would be one element between them. If you think of it in terms of arrays it probably will make a lot more sense. – Shafik Yaghmour Aug 4 '13 at 3:40
4

First, in the print:

printf("\nThe address of a-b is: %ld\nvalue of a is %ld\nValue of b is %ld\nsize of pointer %ld ", (&a-&c),a,b,sizeof(&a));

What you pass is (&a-&c), not (&a-&b). Passing &a-&b, then you will actually get output:

 The address of a-b is: 1

Why? Probably the compiler happens to put a,b,c in serial memory, and it looks as if it's an array, and in pointer arithmetic, subtraction will return the number of elements, not bytes.

Note that it's undefined behavior, because pointer arithmetic is only valid when they are indeed in the same array, which they are not in your example.

5
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    You really didn't answer the question. @Jib saw both addresses and expected the difference to be 8 given the two addresses. While the actual difference is implementation-defined, the difference of the addresses are well-defined if you actually know what they are – SheetJS Aug 4 '13 at 3:44
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    @Nirk I answered that with in pointer arithmetic, subtraction will return the number of elements, not bytes. And you are wrong, pointers are not addresses, they have a type. – Yu Hao Aug 4 '13 at 3:51
  • "Note that it's undefined behavior". It's not undefined. It's implementation specific. What @Jib asked is a valid question and there is a well-defined answer – SheetJS Aug 4 '13 at 3:54
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    @Nirk I didn't say the question is invalid, what I said is using pointer arithmetic when the pointers are not pointing to elements in the same array , like the code in the question, is undefined behavior, see C11 6.5.6, it's not implementation specific. – Yu Hao Aug 4 '13 at 3:56
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    @Nirk: It is undefined behavior. Per C 2011 (N1570) 6.5.6 9: “When two pointers are subtracted, both shall point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object;…” Per 4 2: “If a ‘shall’ or ‘shall not’ requirement that appears outside of a constraint or runtime-constraint is violated, the behavior is undefined.” An implementation is free to define this behavior but is not required by the C standard to do so. As the C standard defines it, implementation-defined behavior is behavior that an implementation must define (not that it merely may define). – Eric Postpischil Aug 4 '13 at 10:23
0

I had a mental lapse and forgot that the addresses are in hex and 0x7fff5fbff880 - 0x7fff5fbff878 = 8 (bytes)

0

The compiler may not place the variables right next to each other, possibly because the block next to it does not have 8 free bytes. Another reason could be that there is a major speed increase for the bytes to be a multiple of 64.

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