I am using a raspberry pi and trying to print unicode characters with something like this:

test.cpp:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main() {
    char a=L'\u1234';
    cout << a << endl;
    return 0;
}

When I compile with g++, I get this warning:

test.cpp: In function "int main()":
test.cpp:4:9: warning: large integer implicitly truncated to unsigned type [-Woverflow]

And the output is:

4

Also, this is not in the GUI and my distribution is raspbian wheezy if that is relevant.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You must set the local before you can use it, unless your native system is using it.

 setlocale(LC_CTYPE,"");

To print the stirng use wcout instead of cout.

#include<iostream>
#include <locale>

int main()
{
    setlocale(LC_CTYPE,"");
    wchar_t a=L'\u1234';
    std::wcout << a << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
  • Won't work, a has to be a wide character. – Basile Starynkevitch Aug 4 '13 at 7:25
  • @BasileStarynkevitch, Uh, yes, I missed to change that as well. Fixed it. – Devolus Aug 4 '13 at 7:29
  • Thank you very much, this solution worked perfectly :) – lkjhgfdsa Aug 4 '13 at 8:09

As a reference to one of the previous answers, you should not use wchar_t and w* functions on Linux. POSIX APIs use char data type and most POSIX implementations use UTF-8 as a default encoding. Quoting the C++ standard (ISO/IEC 14882:2011)

5.3.3 Sizeof

sizeof(char), sizeof(signed char) and sizeof(unsigned char) are 1. The result of sizeof applied to any other fundamental type (3.9.1) is implementation-defined. [ Note: in particular, sizeof(bool), sizeof(char16_t), sizeof(char32_t), and sizeof(wchar_t) are implementation-defined. 74 — end note ]

UTF-8 uses 1-byte code units and up to 4 code units to represent a code point, so char is enough to store UTF-8 strings, though to manipulate them you are going to need to find out if a specific code unit is represented by multiple bytes and build your processing logic with that in mind. wchar_t has an implementation-defined size and the Linux distributions that I have seen have a size of 4 bytes for this data type.

There is another problem that the mapping from the source code to the object code may transform your encoding in a compiler-specific way:

2.2 Phases of translation

Physical source file characters are mapped, in an implementation-defined manner, to the basic source character set (introducing new-line characters for end-of-line indicators) if necessary.

Anyway, in the most cases you don't have any conversions on your source code so the strings that you put into char* stay unmodified. If you encode your source code with UTF-8 then you are going to have bytes representing UTF-8 code units in your char*s.

As for your code example: it does not work as expected because 1 char has a size of 1 byte. Unicode code points may require several (up to 4) UTF-8 code units to be serialized (for UTF-8 1 code unit == 1 byte). You can see here that U+1234 requires three bytes E1 88 B4 when UTF-8 is used and, therefore, cannot be stored in a single char. If you modify your code as follows it's going to work just fine:

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    char* str = "\u1234";
    std::cout << str << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

This is going to output though you may see nothing depending on your console and the installed fonts, the actual bytes are going to be there. Note that with double quotes you also have a \0 terminator in-memory.

You could also use an array, but not with single quotes since you would need a different data type (see here for more information):

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    char* str = "\u1234";
    std::cout << str << std::endl;

    // size of the array is 4 because \0 is appended
    // for string literals and there are 3 bytes
    // needed to represent the code point
    char arr[4] = "\u1234";
    std::cout.write(arr, 3);
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The output is going to be on the two different lines in this case.

You have to use wide characters:

try with:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    wchar_t a = L'\u1234';
    wcout << a << endl;
}
  • 1
    Why must we use wide characters? – 0x499602D2 Aug 4 '13 at 14:06
  • @dieram3, no, you shouldn't. Firstly, wchar_t has nothing to do with Unicode - it is merely enough to store a 4-byte code unit on most Linux distributions and otherwise is implementation-defined. POSIX APIs use single-byte per code point encodings such as UTF-8 so you need to use plain 'char' data type. wchar_t usage for working with Unicode comes from Windows – Dmitrii S. Sep 5 '15 at 11:30
  • @0x499602D2 I would rather advice not to use wide characters on Linux, please take a look at my answer instead: stackoverflow.com/questions/18040393/… – Dmitrii S. Sep 5 '15 at 12:54

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