16
List<int> _lstNeedToOrder = new List<int>();
_lstNeedToOrder.AddRange(new int[] { 1, 5, 6, 8 });

//I need to sort this based on the below list.

List<int> _lstOrdered = new List<int>();//to order by this list
_lstOrdered.AddRange(new int[] { 13, 5, 11, 1, 4, 9, 2, 7, 12, 10, 3, 8, 6 });

order will be -->_lstNeedToOrder = 5,1,8,6

How can I do it?

19

Well the simple - but inefficient - way would be:

var result = _lstNeedToOrder.OrderBy(x => _lstOrdered.IndexOf(x));

An alternative would be to work out a far way of obtaining the desired index of a value. If your values will always in be the range [1...n] you could just invert that "ordered" list to be a "list of indexes by value". At which point you could use:

var result = _lstNeedToOrder.OrderBy(x => indexes[x]);

(where indexes would have an extra value at the start for 0, just to make things simpler).

Alternatively, you could create a Dictionary<int, int> from value to index. That would be more general, in that it would handle a very wide range of values without taking a lot of memory. But a dictionary lookup is obviously less efficient than an array or list lookup.

Just as a side note which wouldn't format well as a comment, your initialization can be simplified using a collection initializer:

var listToOrder = new List<int> { 1, 5, 6, 8 };
var orderedList = new List<int> { 13, 5, 11, 1, 4, 9, 2, 7, 12, 10, 3, 8, 6 };
  • Hey Jon, sorry If it's a dumb question, but why is the first inefficient ? – Dimitar Dimitrov Aug 4 '13 at 7:24
  • 1
    @DimitarDimitrov: It uses IndexOf to find the desired index of each entry. That's an O(n) operation on the size of _lstOrdered, unnecessarily. – Jon Skeet Aug 4 '13 at 7:25
  • @DimitarDimitrov maybe because the use of IndexOf? – King King Aug 4 '13 at 7:25
  • @JonSkeet Awkward Yep obviously ... oh well, that's very very embarrassing. – Dimitar Dimitrov Aug 4 '13 at 7:32
  • @JonSkeet, Thanks Jon! I wish I could be like you someday! – Rami Shareef Aug 4 '13 at 7:38
13
    List<int> results = _lstOrdered.Where(item => _lstNeedToOrder.Contains(item)).ToList();
  • Interesting idea. It wouldn't handle duplicates, but we don't know whether that's required of course. – Jon Skeet Aug 4 '13 at 7:22
  • Hm, I hadn't thought of that case. :) I guess it's up to the OP whether that's in the requirements or not. – Vaughan Hilts Aug 4 '13 at 7:23
  • @VaughanHilts, there will be no duplicates in my case, Thanks! – Rami Shareef Aug 4 '13 at 7:41
  • Haha, good to know. Thanks for the upvote. – Vaughan Hilts Aug 4 '13 at 7:43
4

This works quite well:

var lookup = _lstOrdered
    .Select((x, n) => new { x, n })
    .ToLookup(x => x.x, x => x.n);

var query =
    from x in _lstNeedToOrder
    let rank = lookup[x]
        .DefaultIfEmpty(int.MaxValue)
        .First()
    orderby rank
    select x;
4

You can build a custom comparer like this:

public class SequenceComparer<T> : IComparer<T> {
    private readonly Dictionary<T, int> indexes;

    public SequenceComparer(IEnumerable<T> sequence) {
        this.indexes =
            sequence
                .Select((item, index) => new { Item = item, Index = index })
                .ToDictionary(x => x.Item, x => x.Index);
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y) {
        return indexes[x].CompareTo(indexes[y]);
    }
}

Now you can say

var result = _lstNeedToOrder.OrderBy(x => x, new SequenceComparer(_lstOrdered));
  • how to use the class SequenceComparer<T>, I don't see how it's used in the OrderBy query. – King King Aug 4 '13 at 7:30
  • 1
    @King King: Thanks. I missed creating it in the call to OrderBy. It's there now. Thanks again. – jason Aug 4 '13 at 7:31
2

Another option is to use Intersect, which guarantees to return elements in the order in which they appear in the first sequence.

So, in this example

var result = _lstOrdered.Intersect(_lstNeedToOrder);

yields { 5, 1, 8, 6} as required.

1

Saving in an intermediate dictionary the order...

// dict key will be the values of _lstOrdered, value will be the index of the
// key in _lstOrdered
// I'm using a seldom used .Select overload that returns the current value 
// plus its index (ix)
var dict = _lstOrdered.Select((p, ix) => new { Value = p, Ix = ix })
                      .ToDictionary(p => p.Value, p => p.Ix);

// note that this will explode if _lstNeedToOrder contains values outside
// _lstOrdered.
_lstNeedToOrder.Sort((p, q) => dict[p] - dict[q]);

The .Sort method sorts in-place so _lstNeedToOrder will be ordered.

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