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I have a set of <tr> elements that I'd like to sort in batches i.e. every nth element is used for comparison in the sorting algorithm and subsequent n-1 elements are moved along with the nth element. (Update : I should clarify that I do not have control over the HTML)

In the following case, the rows are sorted alphabetically by the value of 1st, 4th & 7th element i.e. Apple, Banana & Coconut. The subsequent 2 <tr> elements following them are moved along with them i.e. batches of 3.

Before sorting:

<tr> Banana </tr>
<tr> - Shake </tr>
<tr> - Chips </tr>
<tr> Apple </tr>
<tr> - Juice </tr>
<tr> - Sauce </tr>
<tr> Coconut </tr>
<tr> - Curry </tr>
<tr> - Water </tr>

After sorting:

<tr> Apple </tr>
<tr> - Juice </tr>
<tr> - Sauce </tr>
<tr> Banana </tr>
<tr> - Shake </tr>
<tr> - Chips </tr>
<tr> Coconut </tr>
<tr> - Curry </tr>
<tr> - Water </tr>

There are some straight forward ways e.g. Split this into 3 lists and sort the first one normally. Then sort second & third based on first list. My question is, is it possible to do it in the compare function in array.sort([compareFunction]) ?

Update : Another method would be to convert it into an array like this

[['Banana','- Shake', '- Chips'],['Apple', '- Juice','- Sauce'],['Coconut','- Curry', '- Water']]

and sort it like this sort(function(a, b) {return a[0] - b[0]})

  • Your main problem does not have so much to do with sorting as with manipulating the DOM. The HTML you give is not at all suited to the task you want to perform -- sub-items appear at the same top level as their parents and there is no relation between parents and children other than the vague "these things that follow and start with - are my children". I would start by improving the HTML because otherwise any solution is going to be brittle. – Jon Aug 5 '13 at 8:24
  • Modulo operation is a good starting point for selecting items. – cr0 Aug 5 '13 at 8:25
  • @Jon : I don't have control over the HTML but I do know that every nth element is the key. – user Aug 5 '13 at 8:29
  • Use list elements instead. These are the ul (unordened list) and li (list item) tags. The li with Banana would then contain another (sub)list with "Shake" and "Chips". – Sumurai8 Aug 5 '13 at 8:30
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is it possible to do it in the compare function in array.sort(compareFunction)?

Yes, by making the array items hierarchy-aware. So you'd have to introduce a pointer from Shake to Banana, from Chips to Banana, from Juice to Apple and so on. The compare function would then look like

function compare(a, b) {
    var aTop = a.parent || a,
        bTop = b.parent || b;
    if (aTop.value > bTop.value) return 1;
    if (aTop.value < aTop.value) return -1;
    if (b.parent == a) return 1;
    if (a.parent == b) return -1;
    if (a.value > b.value) return 1;
    if (a.value < b.value) return -1;
    return 0;
}

It would be possible a bit more programmatically (with an array), but believe me - you don't really want this.

A similar approach would be to to simply concatenate the arrays to strings ( ["Banana"]"Banana", ["Banana", "Shake"]"Banana-Shake") so that you didn't need a custom compare function any more, and then split them after sorting to get back the original values.

However, your grouping method is superior to these approaches as it requires much less comparisons.

| improve this answer | |
  • This answer definitely gave me a good pointer to use the compare function. Although I agree that the grouping approach works well. – user Aug 5 '13 at 13:16
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I've used a basic array to display the method, but this worked for me:

var groupSize = 3;    
var arr = ['banana',' - shake',' - chips','apple',' - juice',' - sauce','coconut',' - curry',' - water'];
var newArr = [];
while((sec = arr.splice(0,groupSize)).length > 0)
{
    newArr.push(sec);
}
newArr.sort()
arr = [];
for(var i in newArr)
{
    for(var j in newArr[i])
    {
        arr.push(newArr[i][j]);
    }
}
console.log(arr); //["apple", " - juice", " - sauce", "banana", " - shake", " - chips", "coconut", " - curry", " - water"]
| improve this answer | |
  • This is essentially the implementation of the method that I had added in the update to my question. Its better to explicitly specify that the compare function in sort is based on the first element. Although I was looking for a shorter solution but this works for the time being. +1. – user Aug 5 '13 at 9:12
  • @buffer What's the point in adding an anonymous function and cluttering up the code to get the same result? – SmokeyPHP Aug 5 '13 at 9:15
  • @buffer I don't know of any way to legibly get the same result with less code. It may well exist, but at least with more verbose code like this it'll be easier to adjust if necessary in the future – SmokeyPHP Aug 5 '13 at 9:17
  • Because you'll have to use the function anyway. You'll have to sort <tr> elements, not just the inner text. You can specify that in the compare function. – user Aug 5 '13 at 9:18
  • By shorter code I meant not having to convert the 1D array to 2D & back. – user Aug 5 '13 at 9:19
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I think you are going to require an extra pass through the table, this could be done when the table is created. You need to create a 'key' based on the header row plus the children.

So after this pass you have, i'm showing attributes but you could use js properties instead:

    <tr data-key="Banana"> Banana </tr>
    <tr data-key="Banana - Shake"> - Shake </tr>
    <tr data-key="Banana - Chips"> - Chips </tr>
    <tr data-key="Apple"> Apple </tr>
    <tr data-key="Apple - Juice"> - Juice </tr>
    <tr data-key="Apple - Sauce"> - Sauce </tr>
    <tr data-key="Coconut"> Coconut </tr>
    <tr data-key="Coconut - Curry"> - Curry </tr>
    <tr data-key="Coconut - Water"> - Water </tr>

then sort by that key

| improve this answer | |
  • Oops, didn't notice the second tier should stay in the original order – Mesh Aug 5 '13 at 8:47

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