51

I'm trying to do a multipart form post using the HttpClient in C# and am finding the following code does not work.

Important:

var jsonToSend = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(json, Formatting.None, new IsoDateTimeConverter());
var multipart = new MultipartFormDataContent();
var body = new StringContent(jsonToSend, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");

multipart.Add(body);
multipart.Add(new ByteArrayContent(File.ReadAllBytes("test.txt")), "test", "test.txt");

var httpClient = new HttpClient();
var response = httpClient.PostAsync(new Uri("http://localhost:55530"), multipart).Result;

Full Program :

namespace CourierMvc.Worker
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            while (true)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Hit any key to make request.");
                Console.ReadKey();

                try
                {
                    var request = new RestRequest(Method.POST)
                    {
                        Resource = "http://localhost:55530"
                    };

                    var json = new CourierMessage
                    {
                        Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString(),
                        Key = "awesome",
                        From = "[email protected]",
                        To = new[] { "[email protected]", "[email protected]" },
                        Subject = "test",
                        Body = "body",
                        Processed = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow,
                        Received = DateTime.Now,
                        Created = DateTime.Now,
                        Sent = DateTime.Now,
                        Links = new[] { new Anchor { Link = "http://google.com" }, new Anchor { Link = "http://yahoo.com" } }
                    };

                    var jsonToSend = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(json, Formatting.None, new IsoDateTimeConverter());
                    var multipart = new MultipartFormDataContent();
                    var body = new StringContent(jsonToSend, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");

                    multipart.Add(body);
                    multipart.Add(new ByteArrayContent(File.ReadAllBytes("test.txt")), "test", "test.txt");

                    var httpClient = new HttpClient();
                    var response = httpClient.PostAsync(new Uri("http://localhost:55530"), multipart).Result;

                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(e);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

I really have no idea why it doesn't work. I get the file to post to the endpoint, but the body (json) never gets there. Am I doing something wrong?

Server Side Code Request:

namespace CourierMvc.Controllers
{
    public class HomeController : Controller
    {
        //
        // GET: /Home/

        public ActionResult Index()
        {
            return Content("Home#Index");
        }


        [ValidateInput(false)]
        public ActionResult Create(CourierMessage input)
        {
            var files = Request.Files;

            return Content("OK");
        }

    }
}

Route Config:

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
    routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

    routes.MapRoute(
        name: "Default",
        url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
        defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Create", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
    );

}
9
  • 4
    Why did somebody down vote this? I provided code, and explained what I'm trying to do. It is a clear statement. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:05
  • It might be helpful if you show the server side code as well so we can see how you are trying to read it. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:16
  • The server side code is just an ASP.NET MVC endpoint, with the model as the input type. Nothing spectacular there, but I put it up to show there are no shenanigans. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:21
  • 1
    That's good to know. I was assuming it was a WebAPI controller. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:23
  • 1
    I had no idea MultipartFormDataContent even existed, so thanks for this! :)
    – Codecat
    Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:27

4 Answers 4

61
public class CourierMessage
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public string Key { get; set; }
    public string From { get; set; }
    public string Subject { get; set; }
    public string Body { get; set; }
    public DateTimeOffset Processed { get; set; }
    public DateTime Received { get; set; }
    public DateTime Created { get; set; }
    public DateTime Sent { get; set; }
    public HttpPostedFileBase File { get; set; }
}  




while (true)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hit any key to make request.");
    Console.ReadKey();

    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
        using (var multipartFormDataContent = new MultipartFormDataContent())
        {
            var values = new[]
            {
                new KeyValuePair<string, string>("Id", Guid.NewGuid().ToString()),
                new KeyValuePair<string, string>("Key", "awesome"),
                new KeyValuePair<string, string>("From", "[email protected]")
                 //other values
            };

            foreach (var keyValuePair in values)
            {
                multipartFormDataContent.Add(new StringContent(keyValuePair.Value), 
                    String.Format("\"{0}\"", keyValuePair.Key));
            }

            multipartFormDataContent.Add(new ByteArrayContent(File.ReadAllBytes("test.txt")), 
                '"' + "File" + '"', 
                '"' + "test.txt" + '"');

            var requestUri = "http://localhost:5949";
            var result = client.PostAsync(requestUri, multipartFormDataContent).Result;
        }
    }
}  

enter image description here

7
  • Try adding a complex list to your example and see if it still works. By a complex list, I mean the List of Anchor objects. I see that you removed them... I don't think that was an accident on your part :) Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 23:56
  • 1
    The only way you can Post a complex object (List) this way is if you serialize them into a comma separated list or into a JSON blob. This is still a good solution. Commented Aug 14, 2013 at 12:27
  • 2
    Thank you so much. Adding escaped quotes around the 'name' when calling Add() was what I've been looking for! "\"{0}\"" Commented Oct 7, 2015 at 1:47
  • 1
    Escaping the quotes of the name, was a great hint for me!
    – BHuelse
    Commented Jul 20, 2017 at 14:29
  • 1
    why do we need to add quotes around the name?
    – ahong
    Commented Dec 20, 2019 at 5:40
13

This is an example of how to post string and file stream with HTTPClient using MultipartFormDataContent. The Content-Disposition and Content-Type need to be specified for each HTTPContent:

Here's my example. Hope it helps:

private static void Upload()
{
    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
        client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("User-Agent", "CBS Brightcove API Service");

        using (var content = new MultipartFormDataContent())
        {
            var path = @"C:\B2BAssetRoot\files\596086\596086.1.mp4";

            string assetName = Path.GetFileName(path);

            var request = new HTTPBrightCoveRequest()
            {
                Method = "create_video",
                Parameters = new Params()
                {
                    CreateMultipleRenditions = "true",
                    EncodeTo = EncodeTo.Mp4.ToString().ToUpper(),
                    Token = "x8sLalfXacgn-4CzhTBm7uaCxVAPjvKqTf1oXpwLVYYoCkejZUsYtg..",
                    Video = new Video()
                    {
                        Name = assetName,
                        ReferenceId = Guid.NewGuid().ToString(),
                        ShortDescription = assetName
                    }
                }
            };

            //Content-Disposition: form-data; name="json"
            var stringContent = new StringContent(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(request));
            stringContent.Headers.Add("Content-Disposition", "form-data; name=\"json\"");
            content.Add(stringContent, "json");

            FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(path);

            var streamContent = new StreamContent(fs);
            streamContent.Headers.Add("Content-Type", "application/octet-stream");
            streamContent.Headers.Add("Content-Disposition", "form-data; name=\"file\"; filename=\"" + Path.GetFileName(path) + "\"");
            content.Add(streamContent, "file", Path.GetFileName(path));

            //content.Headers.ContentDisposition = new ContentDispositionHeaderValue("attachment");

            Task<HttpResponseMessage> message = client.PostAsync("http://api.brightcove.com/services/post", content);

            var input = message.Result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
            Console.WriteLine(input.Result);
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Thank you. This saved me after a good hour of searching how to put data in the http form of the request: stringContent.Headers.Add("Content-Disposition", "form-data; name=\"json\""); Now my Json object is super easy to acces. this.Request.Form["json"]; Commented May 19, 2017 at 10:08
  • 1
    "The Content-Disposition and Content-Type need to be specified for each HTTPContent" -> this saved me Commented Jun 13, 2017 at 9:54
6

So the problem I'm seeing is that the MultipartFormDataContent request message will always set the content type of the request to "multipart/form-data". Endcoding json and placing that into the request only "looks" like to the model binder as a string.

Your options are:

  • have your mvc action method receive a string and deserialize into your object
  • post each property of your model as a form part
  • create a custom model binder that will handle your request.
  • Breakup the operation into two posts, first sends the json metadata, the other sends the file. The response from the server should send some id or key to correlate the two requests.

Reading through the RFC document and the MSDN documentation you may be able to do this, if you replace MultipartFormDataContent with MultipartContent. But I have not tested this yet.

5
  • Tried MultipartContent and that did not work. I really don't want to do your first suggestion, but it is looking more likely that it will be the case. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:52
  • You are right about the HttpClient wanting to add string content as a form value instead of just posting it as another part of the post. Not sure if this is a bug in HttpClient or a fundamental misunderstanding on my part. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 14:59
  • Well, normally when you have to post a file the content type is 'multipart/form-data', as with any form data type the post is simply a key value pair serialization. When you added your json, it was just another pair, not seen as a serialized object to the model binder in MVC.
    – Jay
    Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 15:03
  • I also realized something else that sucks about this, I have a combination of model binding that happens from both the URL and the body. Writing a modelbinder means doing that will be that much harder. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 16:03
  • I ended up writing a model binder to handle this. Not great, but will have to do I guess. Commented Aug 5, 2013 at 17:34
0
string path = @"C:\New folder\Test.pdf";  // **ANY FILE**
                            
var formContent = new MultipartFormDataContent
{
     { new ByteArrayContent(File.ReadAllBytes(path)), "file", Path.GetFileName(path) }
};

var client = new HttpClient();
var response = client.PostAsync(_configuration["Url"], formContent).Result;
1
  • Note: there will be a limit on file size (which can be adjustable on configuration file) Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 7:22

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