83

I've got a list in a Python program that contains a series of numbers, which are themselves ASCII values. How do I convert this into a "regular" string that I can echo to the screen?

148

You are probably looking for 'chr()':

>>> L = [104, 101, 108, 108, 111, 44, 32, 119, 111, 114, 108, 100]
>>> ''.join(chr(i) for i in L)
'hello, world'
2
  • 10
    I'll bet you created that list L using [ord(x) for x in 'hello, world']
    – zapstar
    Aug 14 '17 at 6:59
  • chars = [chr(i) for i in range(97, 97 + 26)] Sep 12 '18 at 10:53
25

Same basic solution as others, but I personally prefer to use map instead of the list comprehension:


>>> L = [104, 101, 108, 108, 111, 44, 32, 119, 111, 114, 108, 100]
>>> ''.join(map(chr,L))
'hello, world'
0
14
import array
def f7(list):
    return array.array('B', list).tostring()

from Python Patterns - An Optimization Anecdote

0
8
l = [83, 84, 65, 67, 75]

s = "".join([chr(c) for c in l])

print s
5

Perhaps not as Pyhtonic a solution, but easier to read for noobs like me:

charlist = [34, 38, 49, 67, 89, 45, 103, 105, 119, 125]
mystring = ""
for char in charlist:
    mystring = mystring + chr(char)
print mystring
5

You can use bytes(list).decode() to do this - and list(string.encode()) to get the values back.

3
def working_ascii():
    """
        G    r   e    e    t    i     n   g    s    !
        71, 114, 101, 101, 116, 105, 110, 103, 115, 33
    """

    hello = [71, 114, 101, 101, 116, 105, 110, 103, 115, 33]
    pmsg = ''.join(chr(i) for i in hello)
    print(pmsg)

    for i in range(33, 256):
        print(" ascii: {0} char: {1}".format(i, chr(i)))

working_ascii()
0

I've timed the existing answers. Code to reproduce is below. TLDR is that bytes(seq).decode() is by far the fastest. Results here:

 test_bytes_decode : 12.8046 μs/rep
     test_join_map : 62.1697 μs/rep
test_array_library : 63.7088 μs/rep
    test_join_list : 112.021 μs/rep
test_join_iterator : 171.331 μs/rep
    test_naive_add : 286.632 μs/rep

Setup was CPython 3.8.2 (32-bit), Windows 10, i7-2600 3.4GHz

Interesting observations:

  • The "official" fastest answer (as reposted by Toni Ruža) is now out of date for Python 3, but once fixed is still basically tied for second place
  • Joining a mapped sequence is almost twice as fast as a list comprehension
  • The list comprehension is faster than its non-list counterpart

Code to reproduce is here:

import array, string, timeit, random
from collections import namedtuple

# Thomas Wouters (https://stackoverflow.com/a/180615/13528444)
def test_join_iterator(seq):
    return ''.join(chr(c) for c in seq)

# community wiki (https://stackoverflow.com/a/181057/13528444)
def test_join_map(seq):
    return ''.join(map(chr, seq))

# Thomas Vander Stichele (https://stackoverflow.com/a/180617/13528444)
def test_join_list(seq):
    return ''.join([chr(c) for c in seq])

# Toni Ruža (https://stackoverflow.com/a/184708/13528444)
# Also from https://www.python.org/doc/essays/list2str/
def test_array_library(seq):
    return array.array('b', seq).tobytes().decode()  # Updated from tostring() for Python 3

# David White (https://stackoverflow.com/a/34246694/13528444)
def test_naive_add(seq):
    output = ''
    for c in seq:
        output += chr(c)
    return output

# Timo Herngreen (https://stackoverflow.com/a/55509509/13528444)
def test_bytes_decode(seq):
    return bytes(seq).decode()

RESULT = ''.join(random.choices(string.printable, None, k=1000))
INT_SEQ = [ord(c) for c in RESULT]
REPS=10000

if __name__ == '__main__':
    tests = {
        name: test
        for (name, test) in globals().items()
        if name.startswith('test_')
    }

    Result = namedtuple('Result', ['name', 'passed', 'time', 'reps'])
    results = [
        Result(
            name=name,
            passed=test(INT_SEQ) == RESULT,
            time=timeit.Timer(
                stmt=f'{name}(INT_SEQ)',
                setup=f'from __main__ import INT_SEQ, {name}'
                ).timeit(REPS) / REPS,
            reps=REPS)
        for name, test in tests.items()
    ]
    results.sort(key=lambda r: r.time if r.passed else float('inf'))

    def seconds_per_rep(secs):
        (unit, amount) = (
            ('s', secs) if secs > 1
            else ('ms', secs * 10 ** 3) if secs > (10 ** -3)
            else ('μs', secs * 10 ** 6) if secs > (10 ** -6)
            else ('ns', secs * 10 ** 9))
        return f'{amount:.6} {unit}/rep'

    max_name_length = max(len(name) for name in tests)
    for r in results:
        print(
            r.name.rjust(max_name_length),
            ':',
            'failed' if not r.passed else seconds_per_rep(r.time))
2
  • Also include the python implementation you are using since that can affect the benchmark numbers. Here is how you can retrieve that information stackoverflow.com/a/14718168/12160191. May 14 '20 at 7:04
  • @MutableSideEffect Done. I know offhand that it’s CPython, but I had no idea you could find that programmatically May 15 '20 at 18:20
-1
Question = [67, 121, 98, 101, 114, 71, 105, 114, 108, 122]
print(''.join(chr(number) for number in Question))
1
  • 1
    Please note that on Stack Overflow it is customary to include some explanation of why the proposed approach answers the question - especially when the question is older and already has an accepted answer. In what way does this suggestion differ and why would it be used instead of an existing answer? Dec 9 '18 at 12:20

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