2

Is there a MYSQL's "FLUSH PRIVILEGES" equivalent existing in SQL Server?

Or, are the changed permissions implicitly updated in SQL Server?

Hope my question is clear.

Thanks,
Bhathiya

4

In SQL Server permissions are applied immediately, no need to flush anything. The moment a GRANT, REVOKE or DENY is issued it is in effect

1

You should use FLUSH PRIVILEGES; only if you modify the grant tables directly using statements such as INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE.

See: Stop using FLUSH PRIVILEGES

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.