8

This question already has an answer here:

I am using String Builder from another answer, but I can't use anything but alpha/numeric, no whitespace, punctuation, etc. Can you explain how to limit the character set in this code? Also, how do I insure it is ALWAYS 30 characters long?

     Random generator = new Random();
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    int Length = 30;
    char tempChar ;
    for (int i = 0; i < Length; i++){
        tempChar = (char) (generator.nextInt(96) + 32);
        stringBuilder.append(tempChar);

I have looked at most of the other answers, and can't figure out a solution to this. Thanks. Don't yell at me if this is a duplicate. Most of the answers don't explain which part of the code controls how long the generated number is or where to adjust the character set.

I also tried stringBuilder.Replace(' ', '1'), which might have worked, but eclipse says there is no method for Replace for StringBuilder.

marked as duplicate by CommonsWare, Brian Roach, madth3, Richard Sitze, Antti Haapala Aug 6 '13 at 1:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Does case matter? – MadProgrammer Aug 5 '13 at 23:30
  • 1
    "Most of the answers don't explain which part of the code controls how long the generated number is or where to adjust the character set." ... pointing out the obvious is usually considered rude. – Brian Roach Aug 5 '13 at 23:31
  • I knew there would be people who would take umbrage with this question. Sorry if I offended, but the answers below have definitely added to the wealth and depth of knowledge available on the site. I do not think this is a duplicate, since the answers have more detailed explanations of the process. – PrivusGuru Aug 7 '13 at 15:42
22

If you want to control the characterset and length take for example

public static String randomString(char[] characterSet, int length) {
    Random random = new SecureRandom();
    char[] result = new char[length];
    for (int i = 0; i < result.length; i++) {
        // picks a random index out of character set > random character
        int randomCharIndex = random.nextInt(characterSet.length);
        result[i] = characterSet[randomCharIndex];
    }
    return new String(result);
}

and combine with

char[] CHARSET_AZ_09 = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789".toCharArray();

to specify the characterset.

It's not based on StringBuilder since you know the length and don't need all the overhead.

It allocates a char[] array of the correct size, then fills each cell in that array with a randomly chosen character from the input array.

more example use here: http://ideone.com/xvIZcd

  • Thanks for ignoring the naysayers. This worked perfectly! – PrivusGuru Aug 7 '13 at 15:38
  • @PrivusGuru btw the code you posted generates numbers between (0..95) + 32 => 32..127. The characters that correspond to those numbers are here asciitable.com for example. Doing it the way your code does would mean limiting the random numbers to 48..57 OR 65..90 OR 97..122 which would be rather painful. (or you discard characters that are not in that range like e.g. @Sello proposed) – zapl Aug 7 '13 at 16:18
  • @zapl is it collision free? – Virtu Mar 28 '16 at 5:13
  • @Virtu No, it's random. That includes generating the same string 10 times in a row, although with very small probability. – zapl Mar 28 '16 at 6:16
2

Here's what I use:

public static String randomStringOfLength(int length) {
    StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
    while (buffer.length() < length) {
        buffer.append(uuidString());
    }

    //this part controls the length of the returned string
    return buffer.substring(0, length);  
}


private static String uuidString() {
    return UUID.randomUUID().toString().replaceAll("-", "");
}
  • Thank you for this. Very Helpful. – PrivusGuru Aug 7 '13 at 15:39
0

You may try this:

    //piece
    int i = 0;
    while(i < length){
      char temp =(char) (generator.nextInt(92)+32);
      if(Character.isLetterOrDigit(temp))
      {
        stringBuilder.append(temp);
        ++i;
      }
    }
    System.out.println(stringBuilder);

Should achieve your goal

  • Thank you for the time and info. I will use this somewhere. – PrivusGuru Aug 7 '13 at 15:39

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