6

is there any inbuilt function in the Ruby String class that can give me all the prefixes of a string in Ruby. Something like:

"ruby".all_prefixes => ["ruby", "rub", "ru", "r"]

Currently I have made a custom function for this:

def all_prefixes search_string
  dup_string = search_string.dup
  return_list = []
  while(dup_string.length != 0)
    return_list << dup_string.dup
    dup_string.chop!
  end 
 return_list 
end

But I am looking for something more rubylike, less code and something magical. Note: of course it goes without saying original_string should remain as it is.

  • 1
    I think what you have is enough good enough, since that looks very rarely used thing. – Smar Aug 6 '13 at 10:27
  • 2
    This is maybe a long shot, but if you want to find distinct abbreviations for a set of strings, you can use Abbrev: ruby-doc.org/stdlib-2.0/libdoc/abbrev/rdoc/Abbrev.html – nTraum Aug 6 '13 at 11:23
  • 1
    @nTraum: Can you change that comment into an answer please? /me is itching to give you an upvote :) – creinig Aug 6 '13 at 11:35
  • Added as an answer. – nTraum Aug 6 '13 at 11:39
7

A quick benchmark:

require 'fruity'

string = 'ruby'

compare do   

  toro2k do
    string.size.times.collect { |i| string[0..i] }
  end

  marek_lipka do
    (0...(string.length)).map{ |i| string[0..i] }
  end

  jorg_w_mittag do
    string.chars.inject([[], '']) { |(res, memo), c| 
      [res << memo += c, memo] 
    }.first
  end

  jorg_w_mittag_2 do
    acc = ''
    string.chars.map {|c| acc += c }
  end

  stefan do
    Array.new(string.size) { |i| string[0..i] }
  end

end

And the winner is:

Running each test 512 times. Test will take about 1 second.
jorg_w_mittag_2 is faster than stefan by 19.999999999999996% ± 10.0%
stefan is faster than marek_lipka by 10.000000000000009% ± 10.0%
marek_lipka is faster than jorg_w_mittag by 10.000000000000009% ± 1.0%
jorg_w_mittag is similar to toro2k
  • no one can deny that this deserves to be the best answer :) – Sahil Dhankhar Aug 6 '13 at 11:31
  • 1
    I'll deny it! Benchmarks for something as trivial as this should not be much of a factor in determining which solution is best, unless you're pushing limits in terms of input length, etc. The real-world differences won't matter as much as readability. Coincidentally I have found @toro2k's other answer to be my preference. – Mark Thomas Dec 10 '17 at 20:27
9

No, there is no built-in method for this. You could do it like this:

def all_prefixes(string)
  string.size.times.collect { |i| string[0..i] }
end
all_prefixes('ruby')
# => ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby"] 
  • thanks.. this looks more cleaner to me. – Sahil Dhankhar Aug 6 '13 at 10:40
6
def all_prefixes(str)
  acc = ''
  str.chars.map {|c| acc += c }
end
  • fastest of all the solutions presented here. – Sahil Dhankhar Aug 6 '13 at 11:32
5

What about

str = "ruby"
prefixes = Array.new(str.size) { |i| str[0..i] }  #=> ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby"]
  • this is actually the cleanest of all(imho). – Sahil Dhankhar Aug 6 '13 at 11:03
4

This is maybe a long shot, but if you want to find distinct abbreviations for a set of strings, you can use the Abbrev module:

require 'abbrev'

Abbrev.abbrev(['ruby']).keys
=> ["rub", "ru", "r", "ruby"]
  • this would have been the best answer if i could do Abbrev.abbrev('ruby').keys instead of Abbrev.abbrev(['ruby']).keys, but this ofcourse is pretty cool – Sahil Dhankhar Aug 6 '13 at 11:45
3

A little bit shorter form:

def all_prefixes(search_string)
  (0...(search_string.length)).map{ |i| search_string[0..i] }
end
all_prefixes 'ruby'
# => ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby"]
  • thanks, although your answer is same as toro2k , but that one looks slightly more cleaner. – Sahil Dhankhar Aug 6 '13 at 10:43
  • Actually your code returns ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby", "ruby"], you should use an exclusive range, i.e. 0...string.size instead of 0..string.size. And string[..] should be search_string[...]. – toro2k Aug 6 '13 at 10:43
  • @toro2k thanks. It was actually a typo. – Marek Lipka Aug 6 '13 at 10:45
  • @sahildhankhar I agree, although I will leave my answer to show alternative. – Marek Lipka Aug 6 '13 at 10:47
1
def all_prefixes(str)
  str.chars.inject([[], '']) {|(res, memo), c| [res << memo += c, memo] }.first
end
1
str = "ruby"    
prefixes = str.size.times.map { |i| str[0..i] }  #=> ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby"]
0

Two not mentioned before and faster than those in the @toro2k's accepted comparison answer.

(1..s.size).map { |i| s[0, i] }
=> ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby"]

Array.new(s.size) { |i| s[0, i+1] }
=> ["r", "ru", "rub", "ruby"]

Strangely, nobody used String#[start, length] before, only the slower String#[range].
And I think at least my first solution is quite straightforward.

Benchmark results (using Ruby 2.4.2):

                           user     system      total        real
toro2k                14.594000   0.000000  14.594000 ( 14.724630)
marek_lipka           12.485000   0.000000  12.485000 ( 12.635404)
jorg_w_mittag         16.968000   0.000000  16.968000 ( 17.080315)
jorg_w_mittag_2       11.828000   0.000000  11.828000 ( 11.935078)
stefan                10.766000   0.000000  10.766000 ( 10.831517)
stefanpochmann         9.734000   0.000000   9.734000 (  9.765227)
stefanpochmann 2       8.219000   0.000000   8.219000 (  8.240854)

My benchmark code:

require 'benchmark'

string = 'ruby'
@n = 10**7

Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  @x = x
  def report(name, &block)
    @x.report(name) {
      @n.times(&block)
    }
  end
  report('toro2k') {
    string.size.times.collect { |i| string[0..i] }
  }
  report('marek_lipka') {
    (0...(string.length)).map{ |i| string[0..i] }
  }
  report('jorg_w_mittag') {
    string.chars.inject([[], '']) { |(res, memo), c| 
      [res << memo += c, memo] 
    }.first
  }
  report('jorg_w_mittag_2') {
    acc = ''
    string.chars.map {|c| acc += c }
  }
  report('stefan') {
    Array.new(string.size) { |i| string[0..i] }
  }
  report('stefanpochmann') {
    (1..string.size).map { |i| string[0, i] }
  }
  report('stefanpochmann 2') {
    Array.new(string.size) { |i| string[0, i+1] }
  }
end

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.