5

I'm representing an infinitely precise integer as an array of unsigned ints for processing on a GPU. For debugging purposes I'd like to print the base 10 representation of one of these numbers, but am having difficulty wrapping my head around it. Here's what I'd like to do:

//the number 4*(2^32)^2+5*(2^32)^1+6*(2^32)^0
unsigned int aNumber[3] = {4,5,6};
char base10TextRepresentation[50];
convertBase2To32ToBase10Text(aNumber,base10TextRepresentation);

Any suggestions on how to approach this problem?

Edit: Here's a complete implementation thanks to drhirsch

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#define SIZE 4

uint32_t divideBy10(uint32_t * number) {
  uint32_t r = 0;
  uint32_t d;
  for (int i=0; i<SIZE; ++i) {
    d = (number[i] + r*0x100000000) / 10;
    r = (number[i] + r*0x100000000) % 10;
    number[i] = d;
  }
  return r;
}

int zero(uint32_t* number) {
  for (int i=0; i<SIZE; ++i) {
    if (number[i] != 0) {
      return 0;
    }
  }
  return 1;
}

void swap(char *a, char *b) {
  char tmp = *a;
  *a = *b;
  *b = tmp;
}

void reverse(char *str) {
  int x = strlen(str);
  for (int y = 0; y < x/2; y++) {
    swap(&str[y],&str[x-y-1]);
  }
}

void convertTo10Text(uint32_t* number, char* buf) {
  int n = 0;
  do {
    int digit = divideBy10(number);
    buf[n++] = digit + '0';
  } while(!zero(number));
  buf[n] = '\0';
  reverse(buf);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  uint32_t aNumber[SIZE] = {0,0xFFFFFFFF,0xFFFFFFFF,0xFFFFFFFF};
  uint32_t bNumber[4] = {1,0,0,0};

  char base10TextRepresentation[50];

  convertTo10Text(aNumber, base10TextRepresentation);
  printf("%s\n",base10TextRepresentation);
  convertTo10Text(bNumber, base10TextRepresentation);
  printf("%s\n",base10TextRepresentation);
}
7
  • 1
    Which language are you working in? C or Java? – Carl Smotricz Nov 27 '09 at 15:55
  • How did you implement infinite precision? :P I assume you mean arbitrary precision. – Ben S Nov 27 '09 at 15:59
  • 2
    Wait, the base is 2^32? It must take an awfully big character set to represent a single digit in that base! :) Are we finding novel ways to fit the US national deficit on a single printed page? – Carl Smotricz Nov 27 '09 at 16:01
  • @Carl & Konamiman, working in C. @Ben S, yes arbitrary; I'm borrowing from Knuth where he would call it "infinite precision". @Carl again, each element of the array is the digit: aNumber[0] is the first digit of a base 2^32 number. – Rich Nov 27 '09 at 16:28
  • 1
    Well, the number of electrons in the Universe (~~10^73) can be expressed in 3, 2^32 digits. And that IS a big number :-} – Ira Baxter Nov 27 '09 at 18:21
4

If you have access to 64 bit arithmetic, it is easier. I would do something along the line of:

int32_t divideBy10(int32_t* number) {
    uint32_t r = 0;
    uint32_t d;
    for (int i=0; i<SIZE; ++i) {
        d = (number[i] + r*0x100000000) / 10;
        r = (number[i] + r*0x100000000) % 10;
        number[i] = d;
        number[i] = r;
}

void convertTo10Text(int32_t* number, char* buf) {
    do {
        digit = divideBy10(number);
        *buf++ = digit + '0';
    } while (!isEqual(number, zero));
    reverse(buf);
}

isEqual() and reverse() left to be implemented. divideBy10 divides by 10 and returns the remainder.

0
4

Fundamentally you need classic decimal printing using digit production by dividing your number by ten (in your base 2^32) repeatedly and using the remainder as digits. You may not have a divide by (anything, let alone) 10 routine, which is probably the key source of your problem.

If you are working in C or C++, you can get a complete infinite precision arithmetic package from GNU Bignum package. Most other widely used languages have similar packages available.

Of course, if you have too much free time, you can always implement multiprecision division yourself. You're already borrowing terminology from Knuth; he also supplies the multiprecision algorithms in Seminumerical Algorithms.

6
  • That is the problem. Unfortunately I do have to implement all the multi-precision stuff myself as I want to offload it to the GPU. Implementing division seems like a good next step. – Rich Nov 27 '09 at 16:34
  • Involving the GPU in infinite precision division for the purpose of printing numbers is a poor use of the GPU; how many decimal printable numbers is it going to produce in one second under normal circumstances? Best to leave this to conventional software. – Ira Baxter Nov 27 '09 at 16:43
  • You imply you are implementing infinite precision arithmetic on the GPU. Assuming it isn't for decimal conversion procedure, why are you doing this? What does the GPU bring to that problem, and why do you expect it to scale well? – Ira Baxter Nov 27 '09 at 16:44
  • Sorry, that's not what I meant to imply. Printing the number is only for debugging off the GPU. On the GPU I am implementing a primality tester for arbitrary precision integers which is an embarrassingly parallel problem. – Rich Nov 27 '09 at 16:55
  • Aha. So are you testing one number at a time in parallel, or lots of numbers in parallel? I'm not a GPU expert, but I didn't think they handled operations that varied considerably in time-to-execute well, because you have in effect a barrier synch at the "end" of the current set of operations, and Amhdahl's law means inefficient speedups in such a case. I'd expect infinite-precision arithmetic ops to have wide variance in timing for multiply/divide/modulo. What am I missing? – Ira Baxter Nov 27 '09 at 18:26
3

If it is .NET, take a look at this implementation of a BigInteger class.

0
0

How about using long doubles? Then you get 80bits in the mantissa, but I guess that the accuracy is lost when using floating point numbers.

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