252

I'm looking at the following code:

if [ -z $2 ]; then
        echo "usage: ...

(The 3 dots are irrelevant usage details.)
Maybe I'm googling it wrong, but I couldn't find an explanation for the -z option.

  • 30
    man test has the answer. (man bash too probably.) – Mat Aug 7 '13 at 7:01
  • 1
    Awsome, thanks! Bad Google, bad! BTW, my knowledge in Bash is very basic. It didn't occur to me to relate the -z to the if. I'll be more creative next time. – Noich Aug 7 '13 at 7:03
  • Google's "bash -z flag" didn't provide anything. – Noich Aug 7 '13 at 7:06
  • 16
    Note that I put the -z inside quotes. Otherwise Google will interpret that as "exclude z". – Jonathon Reinhart Aug 7 '13 at 7:09
  • 7
    @JonathonReinhart: This is now one of the top Google results! – Casebash Feb 27 '14 at 6:05
335

-z string True if the string is null (an empty string)

  • I found another one excellent and detailed explanation - stackoverflow.com/questions/3601515/… – valentt May 11 '17 at 13:16
  • 32
    Also, -n is the opposite of -z. if [ -n "${1}" ] passes if the string is not null and not empty. – Ryan Mar 26 '18 at 23:48
  • 4
    Is -n redundant with the default behavior of if [ $2 ] or are there some differences? – bbarker Jan 18 at 18:32
48
-z

string is null, that is, has zero length

String=''   # Zero-length ("null") string variable.

if [ -z "$String" ]
then
  echo "\$String is null."
else
  echo "\$String is NOT null."
fi     # $String is null.
17

test -z returns true if the parameter is empty (see man sh or man test)

10

The expression -z string is true if, the length of string is zero.

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