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What is the difference between the search() and match() functions in the Python re module?

I've read the Python 2 documentation (Python 3 documentation), but I never seem to remember it.

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  • 1
    The way I remember it is that "search" evokes the image in my mind of an explorer with binoculars searching off in to the distance, just like search will search to the end of the string off in the distance. Nov 13, 2022 at 17:56

10 Answers 10

666

re.match is anchored at the beginning of the string. That has nothing to do with newlines, so it is not the same as using ^ in the pattern.

As the re.match documentation says:

If zero or more characters at the beginning of string match the regular expression pattern, return a corresponding MatchObject instance. Return None if the string does not match the pattern; note that this is different from a zero-length match.

Note: If you want to locate a match anywhere in string, use search() instead.

re.search searches the entire string, as the documentation says:

Scan through string looking for a location where the regular expression pattern produces a match, and return a corresponding MatchObject instance. Return None if no position in the string matches the pattern; note that this is different from finding a zero-length match at some point in the string.

So if you need to match at the beginning of the string, or to match the entire string use match. It is faster. Otherwise use search.

The documentation has a specific section for match vs. search that also covers multiline strings:

Python offers two different primitive operations based on regular expressions: match checks for a match only at the beginning of the string, while search checks for a match anywhere in the string (this is what Perl does by default).

Note that match may differ from search even when using a regular expression beginning with '^': '^' matches only at the start of the string, or in MULTILINE mode also immediately following a newline. The “match” operation succeeds only if the pattern matches at the start of the string regardless of mode, or at the starting position given by the optional pos argument regardless of whether a newline precedes it.

Now, enough talk. Time to see some example code:

# example code:
string_with_newlines = """something
someotherthing"""

import re

print re.match('some', string_with_newlines) # matches
print re.match('someother', 
               string_with_newlines) # won't match
print re.match('^someother', string_with_newlines, 
               re.MULTILINE) # also won't match
print re.search('someother', 
                string_with_newlines) # finds something
print re.search('^someother', string_with_newlines, 
                re.MULTILINE) # also finds something

m = re.compile('thing$', re.MULTILINE)

print m.match(string_with_newlines) # no match
print m.match(string_with_newlines, pos=4) # matches
print m.search(string_with_newlines, 
               re.MULTILINE) # also matches
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  • 38
    Why would anyone use limited match rather than more general search then? is it for speed?
    – Alby
    Jul 23, 2014 at 2:55
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    @Alby match is much faster than search, so instead of doing regex.search("word") you can do regex.match((.*?)word(.*?)) and gain tons of performance if you are working with millions of samples.
    – Ivan Bilan
    May 24, 2016 at 9:34
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    Well, that's goofy. Why call it match? Is it a clever maneuver to seed the API's with unintuitive names to force me to read the documentation? I still won't do it! Rebel!
    – Sammaron
    Sep 16, 2016 at 15:14
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    @ivan_bilan match looks a bit faster than search when using the same regular expression but your example seems wrong according to a performance test: stackoverflow.com/questions/180986/…
    – baptx
    Jan 21, 2019 at 18:56
  • 2
    When using a regular expression beginning with '^', and with MULTILINE unspecified, is match the same as search (produce the same result)?
    – Zitao Wang
    Aug 19, 2019 at 14:23
143

search ⇒ find something anywhere in the string and return a match object.

match ⇒ find something at the beginning of the string and return a match object.

0
107

match is much faster than search, so instead of doing regex.search("word") you can do regex.match((.*?)word(.*?)) and gain tons of performance if you are working with millions of samples.

This comment from @ivan_bilan under the accepted answer above got me thinking if such hack is actually speeding anything up, so let's find out how many tons of performance you will really gain.

I prepared the following test suite:

import random
import re
import string
import time

LENGTH = 10
LIST_SIZE = 1000000

def generate_word():
    word = [random.choice(string.ascii_lowercase) for _ in range(LENGTH)]
    word = ''.join(word)
    return word

wordlist = [generate_word() for _ in range(LIST_SIZE)]

start = time.time()
[re.search('python', word) for word in wordlist]
print('search:', time.time() - start)

start = time.time()
[re.match('(.*?)python(.*?)', word) for word in wordlist]
print('match:', time.time() - start)

I made 10 measurements (1M, 2M, ..., 10M words) which gave me the following plot:

match vs. search regex speedtest line plot

As you can see, searching for the pattern 'python' is faster than matching the pattern '(.*?)python(.*?)'.

Python is smart. Avoid trying to be smarter.

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    +1 for actually investigating the assumptions behind a statement meant to be taken at face value -- thanks. Oct 30, 2018 at 16:37
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    Indeed the comment of @ivan_bilan looks wrong but the match function is still faster than the search function if you compare the same regular expression. You can check in your script by comparing re.search('^python', word) to re.match('python', word) (or re.match('^python', word) which is the same but easier to understand if you don't read the documentation and seems not to affect the performance)
    – baptx
    Jan 21, 2019 at 18:36
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    @baptx I disagree with the statement that the match function is generally faster. The match is faster when you want to search at the beginning of the string, the search is faster when you want to search throughout the string. Which corresponds with the common sense. That's why @ivan_bilan was wrong - he used match to search throughout the string. That's why you are right - you used match to search at the beginning of the string. If you disagree with me, try to find regex for match that is faster than re.search('python', word) and does the same job.
    – Jeyekomon
    Jan 22, 2019 at 10:57
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    @baptx Also, as a footnote, the re.match('python') is marginally faster than re.match('^python'). It has to be.
    – Jeyekomon
    Jan 22, 2019 at 11:26
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    @Jeyekomon yes that's what I meant, match function is a bit faster if you want to search at the beginning of a string (compared to using search function to find a word at the beginning of a string with re.search('^python', word) for example). But I find this weird, if you tell the search function to search at the beginning of a string, it should be as fast as the match function.
    – baptx
    Jan 23, 2019 at 20:23
59

re.search searches for the pattern throughout the string, whereas re.match does not search the pattern; if it does not, it has no other choice than to match it at start of the string.

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    Why match at start, but not till end of string (fullmatch in phyton 3.4)? Jul 14, 2015 at 19:21
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The difference is, re.match() misleads anyone accustomed to Perl, grep, or sed regular expression matching, and re.search() does not. :-)

More soberly, As John D. Cook remarks, re.match() "behaves as if every pattern has ^ prepended." In other words, re.match('pattern') equals re.search('^pattern'). So it anchors a pattern's left side. But it also doesn't anchor a pattern's right side: that still requires a terminating $.

Frankly given the above, I think re.match() should be deprecated. I would be interested to know reasons it should be retained.

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    "behaves as if every pattern has ^ prepended." is only true if you don't use the multiline option. The correct statement is "... has \A prepended"
    – JoelFan
    Jun 27, 2017 at 23:38
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You can refer the below example to understand the working of re.match and re.search

a = "123abc"
t = re.match("[a-z]+",a)
t = re.search("[a-z]+",a)

re.match will return none, but re.search will return abc.

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    Would just like to add that search will return _sre.SRE_Match object (or None if not found). To get 'abc', you need to call t.group()
    – SanD
    Mar 1, 2017 at 15:09
23

Much shorter:

  • search scans through the whole string.

  • match scans only the beginning of the string.

Following Ex says it:

>>> a = "123abc"
>>> re.match("[a-z]+",a)
None
>>> re.search("[a-z]+",a)
abc
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  • 1
    Even with most of the examples posted here, I am having a hard time seeing the description 'beginning of the string' as an accurate statement. I don't know, it just seems arbitrary. How do I know where the beginning of the string 'ends'?? Is it via a newline? because based from the example here, 'beginning' simply means the very first character '1'. Jan 5, 2023 at 6:57
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re.match attempts to match a pattern at the beginning of the string. re.search attempts to match the pattern throughout the string until it finds a match.

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Quick answer

re.search('test', ' test')      # returns a Truthy match object (because the search starts from any index) 

re.match('test', ' test')       # returns None (because the search start from 0 index)
re.match('test', 'test')        # returns a Truthy match object (match at 0 index)
1

re.match is anchored at the beginning of a string, while re.search scans through the entire string. So in the following example, x and y match the same thing.

x = re.match('pat', s)       # <--- already anchored at the beginning of string
y = re.search('\Apat', s)    # <--- match at the beginning

If a string doesn't contain line breaks, \A and ^ are essentially the same; the difference shows up in multiline strings. In the following example, re.match will never match the second line, while re.search can with the correct regex (and flag).

s = "1\n2"
re.match('2', s, re.M)       # no match
re.search('^2', s, re.M)     # match
re.search('\A2', s, re.M)    # no match  <--- mimics `re.match`

There's another function in re, re.fullmatch() that scans the entire string, so it is anchored both at the beginning and the end of a string. So in the following example, x, y and z match the same thing.

x = re.match('pat\Z', s)     # <--- already anchored at the beginning; must match end
y = re.search('\Apat\Z', s)  # <--- match at the beginning and end of string
z = re.fullmatch('pat', s)   # <--- already anchored at the beginning and end

Based on Jeyekomon's answer (and using their setup), using the perfplot library, I plotted the results of timeit tests that looks into:

  • how do they compare if re.search "mimics" re.match? (first plot)
  • how do they compare if re.match "mimics" re.search? (second plot)
  • how do they compare if the same pattern is passed to them? (last plot)

Note that the last pattern doesn't produce the same output (because re.match is anchored at the beginning of a string.)

performance plot

The first plot shows match is faster if search is used like match. The second plot supports @Jeyekomon's answer and shows search is faster if match is used like search. The last plot shows there's very little difference between the two if they scan for the same pattern.


Code used to produce the performance plot.

import re
from random import choices
from string import ascii_lowercase
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from perfplot import plot

patterns = [
    [re.compile(r'\Aword'), re.compile(r'word')],
    [re.compile(r'word'), re.compile(r'(.*?)word')],
    [re.compile(r'word')]*2
]

fig, axs = plt.subplots(1, 3, figsize=(20,6), facecolor='white')
for i, (pat1, pat2) in enumerate(patterns):
    plt.sca(axs[i])
    perfplot.plot(
        setup=lambda n: [''.join(choices(ascii_lowercase, k=10)) for _ in range(n)],
        kernels=[lambda lst: [*map(pat1.search, lst)], lambda lst: [*map(pat2.match, lst)]],
        labels= [f"re.search(r'{pat1.pattern}', w)", f"re.match(r'{pat2.pattern}', w)"],
        n_range=[2**k for k in range(24)],
        xlabel='Length of list',
        equality_check=None
    )
fig.suptitle('re.match vs re.search')
fig.tight_layout();

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