7

So I made a pretty simple word generator program in c# that works relatively well. It generates a word based on the length defined by the user.

The algorithm adds a consonant and then a vowel for each consecutive letter in the sequence, which isn't ideal, but works well enough for basic words.

My only issue is that I told it to add a "u" to the letter sequence if a "q" shows up right before it, but no matter what I've done it makes the word at least 1 letter too long.

I have marked my problem area with a star in the comment above it. Here is the code:

public void WordFinder()
{
    string word = null;
    int cons;
    int vow;
    //counter
    int i = 0;
    bool isword = false;
    Random rnd = new Random();
    //set a new string array of consonants
    string[] consonant = new string[]{"b","c","d","f","g","h","j","k","l","m","n","p","q","r","s","t","v","w","x","y","z"};
    //set a new string array of vowels
    string[] vowel = new string[]{"a","e","i","o","u"};
    while (isword == false)
    {
        word = null;
        Console.WriteLine("Pick the length of a word");
        int num = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        //set the counter "i" to 1
        i = 1;
        if (num%2 == 0)
        {
            while (i <= num)
            {
                if (num != 1)
                {
                    // current consonant = random consonant
                    cons = rnd.Next(0, 20);
                    // get the consonant from the string array "consonant" and add it to word
                    word = word + consonant[cons];
                    // add 1 to counter
                    i ++;
                    //* if the consonant is "q"
                    if (cons == 12)
                    {
                        // add "u" right after it
                        word = word + vowel[4];
                        // add 1 to counter
                        i++;
                    }
                }
                vow = rnd.Next(0, 4);
                word = word + vowel[vow];
                i ++;
            }
        }
        if (num % 2 != 0)
        {
            while (i <= num - 1)
            {
                //repeat same code as done to even length
                if (num != 1)
                {
                    cons = rnd.Next(0, 20);
                    word = word + consonant[cons];
                    i ++;
                    if (cons == 12)
                    {
                        word = word + vowel[4];
                        i ++;
                    }
                }
                vow = rnd.Next(0, 4);
                word = word + vowel[vow];
                i ++;
            }
            // if the length is not equal to 1
            if (num != 1)
            {
                // add a consonant to the end of the word
                cons = rnd.Next(0, 20);
                word = word + consonant[cons];
            }
            //if the length is 1
            else if (num == 1)
            {
                // pick a vowel
                vow = rnd.Next(0, 4);
                word = word + vowel[vow];
            }
        }
        i = 1;
        Console.WriteLine(word);
        Console.WriteLine("Is this a word? (y/n)");
        string q = Console.ReadLine();
        q = q.ToLower();
        //if the answer is yes, then it is a word and end the loop
        if (q == "y" || q == "yes")
        {
            isword = true;
        }
        //if the answer is no try the loop again
        else if (q == "n" || q == "no")
        {
            isword = false;
        }
    }
}
// main method
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Program prog = new Program();
    prog.WordFinder();
    //wait for user input
    Console.ReadLine();
}
}
12
  • 18
    Almost all of the comments in that code aren't helpful. Comments should be there to tell you information that the code doesn't tell you (or that isn't obvious from the code). A comment that just states the exactly what the code does doesn't help anyone, it just wastes people's time.
    – Servy
    Aug 7 '13 at 17:50
  • 2
    I don't understand what it has made the word a letter (or the amount of times a "q" was added after a "u" longer means. You might try using consonant[cons] == 'q' as your if condition, instead of the magic number 12 you have there. Aug 7 '13 at 17:50
  • 2
    The way I'm reading this, for each pass through the loop you are adding 2 letters. A consonant and a vowel. In the case of generating a Q you are adding a total of 3 letters: QU plus a random other vowel. The logic here appears to be way off.
    – NotMe
    Aug 7 '13 at 17:55
  • 1
    @OrrenRavid: You don't have to apologize for your comments. That was constructive criticism, not plain old criticism. @servy was just noting that you're wasting your time with comments like i++; // add one to i. Save your comments for the hard to understand stuff and you save yourself time and effort. Which is good!
    – user1228
    Aug 7 '13 at 19:04
  • 1
    @Will You also consume the reader's time with such comments, run the risk of the comments getting out of sync as the code changes (meaning it's either wrong and therefore confusing, or a maintenance cost to update all of the comments) and also makes it much harder to find the real meaningful comments. If you force the reader to gloss over all of your comments due to them being fluff, they'll also skip over the important ones that they really need to read.
    – Servy
    Aug 7 '13 at 19:08
12

I refactored your answer and after some debugging I got it to work. Sorry I couldn't just do a tweak on it to fix it. I believe it does not allow a word to end in "qu" or "q".

public void WordFinder()
{
    bool isWord = false;
    Random rnd = new Random();
    string[] consonants = { "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", "h", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z" };
    string[] vowels = { "a", "e", "i", "o", "u" };


    while (isWord == false)
    {
        string word = "";

        Console.WriteLine("Pick the length of a word");
        int requestedLength = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        // Generate the word in consonant / vowel pairs
        while (word.Length < requestedLength)
        {
            if (requestedLength != 1)
            {
                // Add the consonant
                string consonant = GetRandomLetter(rnd, consonants);

                if (consonant == "q" && word.Length + 3 <= requestedLength) // check +3 because we'd add 3 characters in this case, the "qu" and the vowel.  Change 3 to 2 to allow words that end in "qu"
                {
                    word += "qu";
                }
                else
                {
                    while( consonant == "q")
                    {
                        // Replace an orphaned "q"
                        consonant = GetRandomLetter(rnd, consonants); 
                    }

                    if (word.Length + 1 <= requestedLength)
                    {
                        // Only add a consonant if there's enough room remaining
                        word += consonant;
                    }
                }
            }

            if (word.Length + 1 <= requestedLength)
            {
                // Only add a vowel if there's enough room remaining
                word += GetRandomLetter(rnd, vowels);
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine(word);
        Console.WriteLine("Is this a word? (y/n)");
        string q = Console.ReadLine().ToLower();

        if (q == "y" || q == "yes")
        {
            isWord = true;
        }
    }
}

private static string GetRandomLetter(Random rnd, string[] letters)
{
    return letters[rnd.Next(0, letters.Length - 1)];
}

Edit: However, that's still pretty unruly. How about generating a random string, and then replacing "q" with "qu" after you're done?

public string WordFinder2(int requestedLength)
{
    Random rnd = new Random();
    string[] consonants = { "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", "h", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z" };
    string[] vowels = { "a", "e", "i", "o", "u" };

    string word = "";

    if (requestedLength == 1)
    {
        word = GetRandomLetter(rnd, vowels);
    }
    else
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < requestedLength; i+=2)
        {
            word += GetRandomLetter(rnd, consonants) + GetRandomLetter(rnd, vowels);
        }

        word = word.Replace("q", "qu").Substring(0, requestedLength); // We may generate a string longer than requested length, but it doesn't matter if cut off the excess.
    }

    return word;
}

private static string GetRandomLetter(Random rnd, string[] letters)
{
    return letters[rnd.Next(0, letters.Length - 1)];
}
1
  • I appreciate these answers Greg. I'm relatively new to c# and programming in general and have been playing around with c# in general and I came up with this code. Due to my minimal knowledge of the c# libraries and classes, I had to write my code in such a brute and simplistic way. I appreciate that you showed both options, one closer to the source program and the other in the more efficient way. Aug 7 '13 at 20:54
1

Your problem is occurring because of the way you are constructing your loops.

You use two separate loops, depending on whether the length is even or odd, and assume in each that the loop will add two characters. However, when a Q is encountered, the loop adds 3 characters, which causes the loop to execute one additional time, and you end up with one extra character.

Try this method:

    string GenerateWord(int length)
    {
        if (length < 1) // do not allow words of zero length
            throw new ArgumentException("Length must be greater than 0");

        string word = string.Empty;

        if (rand.Next() % 2 == 0) // randomly choose a vowel or consonant to start the word
            word += cons[rand.Next(0, 20)];
        else
            word += vowel[rand.Next(0, 4)];

        for (int i = 1; i < length; i += 2) // the counter starts at 1 to account for the initial letter
        { // and increments by two since we append two characters per pass
            char c = cons[rand.Next(0, 20)];
            char v = vowel[rand.Next(0, 4)];

            if (c == 'q') // append qu if the random consonant is a q
                word += "qu";
            else // otherwise just append a random consant and vowel
                word += c + v;
        }

        // the word may be short a letter because of the way the for loop above is constructed
        if (word.Length < length) // we'll just append a random consonant if that's the case
            word += cons[rand.Next(0, 20)];

        return word;
    }
3
  • Good first pass, however it skips the requirement that a vowel always follows QU. Also, there exists the possibility of ending on a Q.
    – NotMe
    Aug 7 '13 at 19:44
  • I don't see that requirement defined. I see that the OPs code implies it, but I'm not entirely sure that is by intention.
    – Michael
    Aug 7 '13 at 19:46
  • @Michael - I had an answer that I deleted where the OP made that requirement. Sorry for the confusion.
    – Greg
    Aug 7 '13 at 19:51
0

I made a smaller one because i was inspired by this post. Im kinda new at C#

{
    class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] consonants = new string[] { "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", "h", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "v", "w", "x", "z" };
            string[] vowels = new string[] { "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", "y", "ee", "aa","ij", "oe" };

            while (true)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("");
                Console.WriteLine("");
                Console.WriteLine("");
                Console.Write("Length word: ");
                int Length = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

                Random rnd = new Random();
                int a;
                int goal = Length;

                for (int i = 0; i != goal; i++)
                {
                    a = rnd.Next(1, consonants.Length);
                    if (i % 2 == 0)
                    {
                        a = rnd.Next(1, consonants.Length);
                        Console.Write(consonants[a]);
                    }
                    Thread.Sleep(10);
                    if (i % 2 != 0)
                    {
                        a = rnd.Next(1, vowels.Length);
                        Console.Write(vowels[a]);
                    }
                    Thread.Sleep(200);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

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