92

What's the easiest way to create a 2d array. I was hoping to be able to do something similar to this:

declare int d[0..m, 0..n]

14 Answers 14

81

You can also create an associative array, or a "hash-table" like array, by specifying the index of the array.

$array = array(
    0 => array(
        'name' => 'John Doe',
        'email' => 'john@example.com'
    ),
    1 => array(
        'name' => 'Jane Doe',
        'email' => 'jane@example.com'
    ),
);

Which is equivalent to

$array = array();

$array[0] = array();
$array[0]['name'] = 'John Doe';
$array[0]['email'] = 'john@example.com';

$array[1] = array();
$array[1]['name'] = 'Jane Doe';
$array[1]['email'] = 'jane@example.com';
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    How can we create this same array using looping statements? – Anoop Pete Oct 26 '12 at 9:11
  • @Anoop-Pete In the second snippet the two repeating blocks would be placed into the loop and the numeric index replaced by a variable that is incremented each iteration. – Atli Oct 27 '12 at 12:53
  • 1
    @AnoopPete : for ($i=0; $i<count($array); $i++){ print($array[$i]['name']); } – Dax Mar 28 '13 at 9:13
64

The following are equivalent and result in a two dimensional array:

$array = array(
    array(0, 1, 2),
    array(3, 4, 5),
);

or

$array = array();

$array[] = array(0, 1, 2);
$array[] = array(3, 4, 5);
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    Those do not result in two-dimensional arrays, but rather result in an array of arrays. – dotancohen Aug 22 '12 at 0:45
  • 5
    @dotancohen That's just semantics, really. Practically the two concepts are the same. The only difference between what is demonstrated there and the kind of multi-dimensional arrays used in languages like C# is syntax. And a fairly small difference in syntax at that. – Atli Sep 4 '13 at 15:11
  • 1
    In C# at least, the memory requirements are different. An array of arrays allocates only the amount of memory needed for each array. A two-dimensional array allocates the whole N * M of memory. – dotancohen Sep 7 '13 at 19:03
  • 6
    @dotancohen The memory requirements between PHP and C# are very different in general, as each language's runtime has it's own way of handling memory. It's generally not something you're concerned with in practice. Not unless you happen to be building some sort of long running, high-performance app, like a game, in which case PHP would be an odd choice of a language. – Atli Apr 14 '14 at 14:46
41

Just declare? You don't have to. Just make sure variable exists:

$d = array();

Arrays are resized dynamically, and attempt to write anything to non-exsistant element creates it (and creates entire array if needed)

$d[1][2] = 3;

This is valid for any number of dimensions without prior declarations.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Except that tells you nothing about the dimensions. If you're declaring an M x N 2D array, chances are it's a matrix and if it's a matrix chances are you'll be doing multiplication or something on it that will necessitate iterating over the elements, which you can't do if it's "sparse" and don't know the dimensions. – cletus Nov 28 '09 at 0:42
  • @cletus: you can just use count on the right dimension though, e.g. count($d[1]), unless I'm misunderstanding your point? – DisgruntledGoat Nov 28 '09 at 1:39
  • 2
    Still, PHP does not have multi-dimensional arrays. The possibility will always exit that an array of arrays might be sparse. So, how about making a class that implements a matrix using arrays, at least then you would take more care of proper implementation. – Don Nov 28 '09 at 1:55
26

Firstly, PHP doesn't have multi-dimensional arrays, it has arrays of arrays.

Secondly, you can write a function that will do it:

function declare($m, $n, $value = 0) {
  return array_fill(0, $m, array_fill(0, $n, $value));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Don't you mean "arrays of arrays", instead of "arrays or arrays"? – Asaph Nov 28 '09 at 0:53
  • @Asaph: yes I did. Fixed. Thanks. – cletus Nov 28 '09 at 1:27
  • 1
    Setting up an array of zeroes is a completely pointless exercise. You don't need to declare an array, just use it. – DisgruntledGoat Nov 28 '09 at 1:36
  • 8
    Except if you need to iterate over it or determine it's size like if you're say doing matrix multiplication. There is a perfectly valid case for filling the array values. – cletus Nov 28 '09 at 2:00
11

For a simple, "fill as you go" kind of solution:

$foo = array(array());

This will get you a flexible pseudo two dimensional array that can hold $foo[n][n] where n <= ∞ (of course your limited by the usual constraints of memory size, but you get the idea I hope). This could, in theory, be extended to create as many sub arrays as you need.

| improve this answer | |
9

Or for larger arrays, all with the same value:

$m_by_n_array = array_fill(0, $n, array_fill(0, $m, $value);

will create an $m by $n array with everything set to $value.

| improve this answer | |
3

As far as I'm aware there is no built in php function to do this, you need to do it via a loop or via a custom method that recursively calls to something like array_fill inidcated in the answer by @Amber;

I'm assuming you mean created an empty but intialized array of arrays. For example, you want a final results like the below of a array of 3 arrays:

   $final_array = array(array(), array(), array());

This is simple to just hand code, but for an arbitrary sized array like a an array of 3 arrays of 3 arrays it starts getting complex to initialize prior to use:

     $final_array = array(array(array(), array(), array()), array(array(), array(), array()), array(array(), array(), array()));

...etc...

I get the frustration. It would be nice to have an easy way to declare an initialized array of arrays any depth to use without checking or throwing errors.

| improve this answer | |
3

atli's answer really helped me understand this. Here is an example of how to iterate through a two-dimensional array. This sample shows how to find values for known names of an array and also a foreach where you just go through all of the fields you find there. I hope it helps someone.

$array = array(
    0 => array(
        'name' => 'John Doe',
        'email' => 'john@example.com'
    ),
    1 => array(
        'name' => 'Jane Doe',
        'email' => 'jane@example.com'
    ),
);

foreach ( $array  as $groupid => $fields) {
    echo "hi element ". $groupid . "\n";
    echo ". name is ". $fields['name'] . "\n";
    echo ". email is ". $fields['email'] . "\n";
    $i = 0;
    foreach ($fields as $field) {
         echo ". field $i is ".$field . "\n";
        $i++;
    }
}

Outputs:

hi element 0
. name is John Doe
. email is john@example.com
. field 0 is John Doe
. field 1 is john@example.com
hi element 1
. name is Jane Doe
. email is jane@example.com
. field 0 is Jane Doe
. field 1 is jane@example.com
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2

And for me the argument about whether an array should be sparse or not depends on the context.

For example, if $a[6][9] is not populated is the equivalent to $a[6][9] being populated with for example with "" or 0.

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2
$r = array("arr1","arr2");

to echo a single array element you should write:

echo $r[0];
echo $r[1];

output would be: arr1 arr2

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  • 2
    This is a one dimensional array. A multidimensional array has at the very least, an array within an array. – Mike Stratton Apr 5 '19 at 1:19
2

And I like this way:

$cars = array
  (
  array("Volvo",22),
  array("BMW",15),
  array("Saab",5),
  array("Land Rover",17)
  );
| improve this answer | |
0

If you want to quickly create multidimensional array for simple value using one liner I would recommend using this array library to do it like this:

$array = Arr::setNestedElement([], '1.2.3', 'value');

which will produce

[
  1 => [
    2 => [
      3 => 'value'
    ]
  ]
]
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0

You can try this, but second dimension values will be equals to indexes:

$array = array_fill_keys(range(0,5), range(0,5));

a little more complicated for empty array:

$array = array_fill_keys(range(0, 5), array_fill_keys(range(0, 5), null));

| improve this answer | |
0

You need to declare an array in another array.

$arr = array(array(content), array(content));

Example:

$arr = array(array(1,2,3), array(4,5,6));

To get the first item from the array, you'll use $arr[0][0], that's like the first item from the first array from the array. $arr[1][0] will return the first item from the second array from the array.

| improve this answer | |

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