95

For example if I have this:

n = c(2, 3, 5) 
s = c("aa", "bb", "cc") 
b = c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE) 
df = data.frame(n, s, b)

  n  s     b
1 2 aa  TRUE
2 3 bb FALSE
3 5 cc  TRUE

Then how do I combine the two columns n and s into a new column named x such that it looks like this:

  n  s     b     x
1 2 aa  TRUE  2 aa
2 3 bb FALSE  3 bb
3 5 cc  TRUE  5 cc
117

Use paste.

 df$x <- paste(df$n,df$s)
 df
#   n  s     b    x
# 1 2 aa  TRUE 2 aa
# 2 3 bb FALSE 3 bb
# 3 5 cc  TRUE 5 cc
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  • .@thelatemail - How to add a special character between data points using paste()? For above example, x column should have data as 2-aa, then 3-bb and 5-cc. – Chetan Arvind Patil Oct 6 '17 at 2:28
  • 7
    .@thelatemail - This worked for me: paste(df$n,df$s,sep="-") – Chetan Arvind Patil Oct 6 '17 at 19:09
  • 2
    how can you omit NA if column s has NA value? (I don't like to see 3 NA if df$s[2]=NA) – Cina Aug 10 '18 at 23:18
31

For inserting a separator:

df$x <- paste(df$n, "-", df$s)
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  • 1
    .@LittleBee - This adds a space between two data. Final output for example is like: A - B instead of A-B. Is it possible to remove this extra space? – Chetan Arvind Patil Oct 6 '17 at 2:35
  • 8
    .@LittleBee - This worked for me: paste(df$n,df$s,sep="-") – Chetan Arvind Patil Oct 6 '17 at 19:09
  • 5
    use paste0 instead of paste – Ferroao Nov 2 '17 at 16:55
  • 3
    This won't give the desired output : OP asks for a space in between the elements, not another separator (which, by the way, would be better put as the sep argument...). The other answer, posted almost 4 years prior to yours, is however perfectly answering the question. – Cath Mar 27 '19 at 9:12
11

As already mentioned in comments by Uwe and UseR, a general solution in the tidyverse format would be to use the command unite:

library(tidyverse)

n = c(2, 3, 5) 
s = c("aa", "bb", "cc") 
b = c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE) 

df = data.frame(n, s, b) %>% 
  unite(x, c(n, s), sep = " ", remove = FALSE)
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  • 1
    What is x in this example? – Levi Apr 3 '19 at 13:51
11

Some examples with NAs and their removal using apply

n = c(2, NA, NA) 
s = c("aa", "bb", NA) 
b = c(TRUE, FALSE, NA) 
c = c(2, 3, 5) 
d = c("aa", NA, "cc") 
e = c(TRUE, NA, TRUE) 
df = data.frame(n, s, b, c, d, e)

paste_noNA <- function(x,sep=", ") {
gsub(", " ,sep, toString(x[!is.na(x) & x!="" & x!="NA"] ) ) }

sep=" "
df$x <- apply( df[ , c(1:6) ] , 1 , paste_noNA , sep=sep)
df
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  • 2
    If you want to use the tidyr package to reproduce the expected answer of the original question this would be a one-liner: tidyr::unite(df, x, n, s, sep = " ", remove = FALSE)[, c(names(df), "x")]. However, I don't see a reason to do so as df$x <- paste(df$n,df$s) is much simpler. – Uwe Dec 9 '16 at 6:59
  • @Ferroao Well, answers shouldn't be too general either, otherwise every question would just have one giant answer incorporating everything. The removal of NA's was not part of OP's simple question, so I don't see how that extra complexity adds value to a simple paste or tidyr::unite. – avid_useR Sep 18 '17 at 14:50
  • @Ferroao Thanks, you saved my life. pls move paste_noNA function before df$x <-apply. – malajisi Mar 11 '19 at 16:57
8

Using dplyr::mutate:

library(dplyr)
df <- mutate(df, x = paste(n, s)) 

df 
> df
  n  s     b    x
1 2 aa  TRUE 2 aa
2 3 bb FALSE 3 bb
3 5 cc  TRUE 5 cc
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  • 1
    No, as already existing answers, you are using paste, not mutate. – zx8754 Mar 27 '19 at 7:32
  • I thought I was demonstrating how columns could be combined as a part of a dplyr::mutate(). Sorry, just trying to be helpful - I won't pollute the site anymore and abstain from future postings. – sbha Mar 27 '19 at 22:44
  • Sorry, if it came out as rude. OP's problem is not solved by using mutate, question is not about how to use dplyr, but how to combine column values. I am simply pointing out that they need paste not mutate. If we want to demonstrate dplyr correct way is using the function unite. – zx8754 Mar 28 '19 at 6:37
8

We can use paste0:

df$combField <- paste0(df$x, df$y)

If you do not want any padding space introduced in the concatenated field. This is more useful if you are planning to use the combined field as a unique id that represents combinations of two fields.

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5

Instead of

  • paste (default spaces),
  • paste0 (force the inclusion of missing NA as character) or
  • unite (constrained to 2 columns and 1 separator),

I'd suggest an alternative as flexible as paste0 but more careful with NA: stringr::str_c

library(tidyverse)

# add two more lines to the example
df <- tibble(
  n = c(2, 3, 5, 8, 12),
  s = c("aa", "bb", "cc", NA_character_, ""),
  b = c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE)
)

df
#> # A tibble: 5 x 3
#>       n s     b    
#>   <dbl> <chr> <lgl>
#> 1     2 aa    TRUE 
#> 2     3 bb    FALSE
#> 3     5 cc    TRUE 
#> 4     8 <NA>  FALSE
#> 5    12 ""    TRUE

df %>% 
  mutate(
    paste = paste(n,"-",s,".",b),
    paste0 = paste0(n,"-",s,".",b),
    str_c = str_c(n,"-",s,".",b)
    )
#> # A tibble: 5 x 6
#>       n s     b     paste          paste0     str_c     
#>   <dbl> <chr> <lgl> <chr>          <chr>      <chr>     
#> 1     2 aa    TRUE  2 - aa . TRUE  2-aa.TRUE  2-aa.TRUE 
#> 2     3 bb    FALSE 3 - bb . FALSE 3-bb.FALSE 3-bb.FALSE
#> 3     5 cc    TRUE  5 - cc . TRUE  5-cc.TRUE  5-cc.TRUE 
#> 4     8 <NA>  FALSE 8 - NA . FALSE 8-NA.FALSE <NA>      
#> 5    12 ""    TRUE  12 -  . TRUE   12-.TRUE   12-.TRUE

Created on 2020-02-12 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

extra note from str_c documentation

Like most other R functions, missing values are "infectious": whenever a missing value is combined with another string the result will always be missing. Use str_replace_na() to convert NA to "NA"

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