14

In VB.NET I often Catch…When:

Try
    …
Catch e As ArgumentNullException When e.ParamName.ToUpper() = "SAMPLES"
    …
End Try

Is there a C# equivalent to Catch…When?

I don't want to resort to using an if statement inside a catch if possible.

13

This functionality was announced for C# 6. It is now possible to write

try { … }
catch (MyException e) when (myfilter(e))
{
    …
}

You can download the preview of Visual Studio 2015 now to check this out, or wait for the official release.

15

There's no equivalent to Catch…When in C#. You will really have to resort to an if statement inside your catch, then rethrow if your condition isn't fulfilled:

try
{
    …
}
catch (ArgumentNullException e)
{
    if ("SAMPLES" == e.ParamName.ToUpper())
    {
        … // handle exception
    }
    else
    {
        throw;  // condition not fulfilled, let someone else handle the exception
    } 
}
  • 2
    I'm with cruizer and Nicholas Mancuso, simply using 'throw' preserves the Stack The Mistake Every C# Programmer Makes – bob31334 May 19 '10 at 18:15
  • @bob31334 Only the stack captured in the exception object, however the state of the program has already been modified and the original stack destroyed, and finally blocks already executed (in other words the when filter runs on the catch statement level and not in the handler, this is similar to SEH in win32 API) – yoel halb May 20 '14 at 17:18
12

That won't recreate the same semantics as the VB Catch When expression. There is one key difference. The VB When expression is executed before the stack unwind occurs. If you were to examine the stack at the point of a when Filter, you would actually see the frame where the exception was thrown.

Having an if in the catch block is different because the catch block executes after the stack is unwound. This is especially important when it comes to error reporting. In the VB scenario you have the capability of crashing with a stack trace including the failure. It's not possible to get that behavior in C#.

EDIT:

Wrote a detailed blog post on the subject.

  • are you sure? you can just use 'throw;' instead of 'throw e;' – Nicholas Mancuso Oct 8 '08 at 3:53
  • 100% It has nothing to do with throw. It's when the expression called by When is executed. In VB it will happen while the exception raise point is still on the stack. – JaredPar Oct 8 '08 at 4:23
  • In c# , Even if the stack is offloaded - the Exception object 'e' still has the stack trace available. but its probably not that helpful as having the entire stack available at debug time. but for runtime loggin info stack trace would suffice? – dotnetcoder Mar 7 '09 at 4:58
  • 1
    Besides debugging, which can be done more easily in C# by ticking the 'break when an exception is thrown' checkbox, this also matters to whether or not 'finally' clauses are run. – configurator Sep 26 '10 at 3:52
  • 1
    +1. Some other links to blog posts by members of the Microsoft .net team. .Net CLR blog post Catch, Rethrow and Filters - Why you should care?. Also of interest The good and the bad of exception filters – MarkJ Aug 16 '12 at 11:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.