21

I have a method which takes in N, the number of objects I want to create, and I need to return a list of N objects.

Currently I can do this with a simple loop:

    private static IEnumerable<MyObj> Create(int count, string foo)
    {
        var myList = new List<MyObj>();

        for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            myList .Add(new MyObj
                {
                    bar = foo
                });
        }

        return myList;
    }

And I'm wondering if there is another way, maybe with LINQ to create this list.

I've tried:

    private static IEnumerable<MyObj> CreatePaxPriceTypes(int count, string foo)
    {
        var myList = new List<MyObj>(count);

        return myList.Select(x => x = new MyObj
            {
                bar = foo
            });

    }

But this does seem to populate my list.

I tried changing the select to a foreach but its the same deal.

I realized that the list has the capacity of count and LINQ is not finding any elements to iterate.

        myList.ForEach(x => x = new MyObj
        {
            bar = foo
        });

Is there a correct LINQ operator to use to get this to work? Or should I just stick with the loop?

  • LINQ is a query tool, it shouldn't be used excessively for creation of objects – Sayse Aug 8 '13 at 9:34
  • 1
    Linq operators like .Select() are intended purely for querying sets and projecting them to the required forms; they're not meant to do anything that alters the original set. What you're trying to do with .Select() is not recommended, although it can be made to work. I'd stick with the loop. – anaximander Aug 8 '13 at 9:36
  • this might be of some value: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/18/… – Default Aug 8 '13 at 9:39
  • if you want to spice it up you can use yield return new MyObj(){ ... }; instead of saving the temporary list – Default Aug 8 '13 at 9:47
  • Would not MyObj[100].AsEnumerable() work? – Wobbles Oct 17 '16 at 10:14
47

You can use the Range to create a sequence:

return Enumerable.Range(0, count).Select(x => new MyObj { bar = foo });

If you want to create a List, you'd have to ToList it.

Mind you though, it's (arguably) a non-obvious solution, so don't throw out the iterative way of creating the list just yet.

  • oh interesting, how about the Repeat method? does that do the same thing? or would it only create a single object, and creates a list of pointers to reference that one object? – EdmundYeung99 Aug 8 '13 at 9:58
  • 2
    In this particular case, it doesn't matter whether it's Range or Repeat, since you don't use the object in Select. What matters is that it generates a sequence with N elements, which you need to create exactly N new objects... – Patryk Ćwiek Aug 8 '13 at 10:16
4

You could create generic helper methods, like so:

// Func<int, T>: The int parameter will be the index of each element being created.

public static IEnumerable<T> CreateSequence<T>(Func<int, T> elementCreator, int count)
{
    if (elementCreator == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("elementCreator");

    for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
        yield return (elementCreator(i));
}

public static IEnumerable<T> CreateSequence<T>(Func<T> elementCreator, int count)
{
    if (elementCreator == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("elementCreator");

    for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
        yield return (elementCreator());
}

Then you could use them like this:

int count = 100;

var strList = CreateSequence(index => index.ToString(), count).ToList();

string foo = "foo";
var myList = CreateSequence(() => new MyObj{ Bar = foo }, count).ToList();
  • this is probably way more complex for my case, but could be more useful to others – EdmundYeung99 Aug 8 '13 at 10:45
1

You can Use Enumerable.Repeat

IEnumerable<MyObject> listOfMyObjetcs = Enumerable.Repeat(CreateMyObject, numberOfObjects);

For more info read https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb348899(v=vs.110).aspx

  • I'm afraid that this will generate a collection filled by a single value – Ilia Maskov Jun 7 '18 at 7:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.