34

I have two inputs, e.g.

pass:       <input type="password" name="pass" required/>
pass again:  <input type="password" name="pass2" required/>

and I want to compare these inputs, and if they match, set input as valid. I tried this, but I think that prop('valid', true); does not work:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('input[name=pass2]').keyup(function() {
        if($('input[name=pass]').val() == $('input[name=pass2]').val()) {
            $('#pass_hint').empty();
            $('#pass_hint').html('match');
            $(this).prop('valid', true);
        } else {
            $('#pass_hint').empty();
            $('#pass_hint').html('mismatch');
            $(this).prop('invalid', true);
        }
    });
});

I create a registration form and if passwords are not the same, input field is invalid and I can´t submit this and show me some hint. ...and I don´t know how I set this input as invalid

5
  • Do you expect some sort of different behavior when you mark it as invalid, or do you just expect the style to indicate to the user that it's invalid? – Travesty3 Aug 8 '13 at 14:39
  • Does you login box actually include a displayed element called #pass_hint? PS. you don't have to empty it, .html() does that for you. – DevlshOne Aug 8 '13 at 14:41
  • 1
    Actually, why are you validating user input in JQuery? It is manipulatable and the user will be easily able to bypass these rules. I suggest doing it on the server side. – Sasanka Panguluri Aug 8 '13 at 14:46
  • 4
    @SasankaPanguluri: Yes, server-side validation is absolutely necessary. But client-side validation is also nice so the user doesn't have to wait for a request to the server to find out they messed something up. – Travesty3 Aug 8 '13 at 14:48
  • i create a registration form and if passwords are not the same, input field is invalid and i don´t submit this and show me some hint. ...and i don´t know how i set this input as invalid – Lubos K. Aug 8 '13 at 14:56
44

In the HTMLInputElement interface, there is no such property as valid or invalid.

You can use the setCustomValidity(error) method with native form validation.

As for your script, here's a demo that should work in all HTML5 compliant browsers:

$('input[name=pass2]').keyup(function () {
    'use strict';

    if ($('input[name=pass]').val() === $(this).val()) {
        $('#pass_hint').html('match');
        this.setCustomValidity('');
    } else {
        $('#pass_hint').html('mismatch');
        this.setCustomValidity('Passwords must match');
    }
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<form action='#'>
    <p>Password:
        <input name=pass type=password required>
    </p>
    <p>Verify:
        <input name=pass2 type=password required>
    </p>
    <p id=pass_hint></p>
    <button type=submit>Submit</button>
</form>

5
  • 1
    I assume Chrome is an HTML 5 Compliant browser, yet your fiddle doesn't work – Serj Sagan Oct 27 '15 at 4:26
  • @SerjSagan I just tested it in Chrome 46.0.2490.80 on Linux and it works. Can you elaborate on what is not working? – rink.attendant.6 Oct 27 '15 at 4:30
  • My bad. Didn't look at the code long enough to see that you had to type at least something in that second field in order for the validation to kick in, nm – Serj Sagan Oct 27 '15 at 6:34
  • 1
    Is this answer out of date? W3Schools has a page on the input:invalid property. – PatPeter Jun 17 '19 at 0:16
  • 1
    @PatPeter that's a CSS selector, not a property on a DOM element. – rink.attendant.6 Jun 17 '19 at 0:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.