155

I want to remove the bad property from every object in the array. Is there a better way to do it than using a for loop and deleting it from every object?

var array = [{"bad": "something", "good":"something"},{"bad":"something", "good":"something"},...];

for (var i = 0, len = array.length; i < len; i++) {
  delete array[i].bad;
}

Just seems like there should be a way to use prototype, or something. I don’t know. Ideas?

8
  • 1
    Does not matter, the other ways cannot get any less then linear O(n). Whatever you use, will require accessing all of your array elements
    – Brian
    Aug 8 '13 at 18:42
  • Prototype? How would that help? Or are all those objects instances of the same constructor and share a common value for bad?
    – Bergi
    Aug 8 '13 at 18:43
  • 1
    @Bergi I wonder if they were referring to prototypeJS, or the Array prototype, which dystroy exemplified
    – Ian
    Aug 8 '13 at 18:46
  • I'm not sure you should store array.length in a variable before looping. I'm sure you'll see it's not worth the pain if you profile. Aug 8 '13 at 18:46
  • 1
    @ZackArgyle Yes, in the general case there's nothing faster. Aug 8 '13 at 18:55

16 Answers 16

265

With ES6, you may deconstruct each object to create new one without named attributes:

const newArray = array.map(({dropAttr1, dropAttr2, ...keepAttrs}) => keepAttrs)
10
  • 29
    Applying to the initial problem it may be const newArray = array.map(({ bad, ...item }) => item);
    – dhilt
    Sep 27 '18 at 12:21
  • 3
    This is very recommended since it doesn't modify the original array (immutable operations)
    – Pizzicato
    Apr 5 '19 at 9:12
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer because it returns a new array, instead of overwriting the existing one. Aug 11 '19 at 0:00
  • 1
    What if the prop is dynamic? And u need to delete it on the fly? Mar 2 at 18:58
  • 3
    @ИгорТашевски .map(({ [prop]: _, ...keep }) => keep) Jun 15 at 17:27
149

The only other ways are cosmetic and are in fact loops.

For example :

array.forEach(function(v){ delete v.bad });

Notes:

  • if you want to be compatible with IE8, you'd need a shim for forEach. As you mention prototype, prototype.js also has a shim.
  • delete is one of the worst "optimization killers". Using it often breaks the performances of your applications. You can't avoid it if you want to really remove a property but you often can either set the property to undefined or just build new objects without the property.
10
  • 1
    Not much better than the loop if the loop is allowed to be "fake"-one lined too :P for(var i = 0; i < array.length ) delete array[i].bad
    – Esailija
    Aug 8 '13 at 18:43
  • 1
    @Esailija Depends. I like to use forEach because I find the code more expressive (and because I stopped worrying about IE a long time ago). Aug 8 '13 at 18:44
  • 1
    Neither of them expresses "delete bad property of all objects in this array" in radically different way. forEach is generic and semantically meaningless by itself, like a for loop.
    – Esailija
    Aug 8 '13 at 18:49
  • 1
    @Esailija I agree. That's why I precised it was "cosmetic". Isn't it clear in my answer ? Aug 8 '13 at 18:50
  • Unfortunate. I'll stick with the for loop which is generally faster than the forEach. And really...who cares about IE8. Thanks for the help. Aug 8 '13 at 18:55
27

I prefer to use map to delete the property and then return the new array item.

array.map(function(item) { 
    delete item.bad; 
    return item; 
});
3
  • 20
    Be aware that this mutates original array
    – piotr_cz
    Oct 19 '17 at 20:37
  • 1
    In this particular case explicit return statement would not be required Aug 21 '19 at 12:58
  • 5
    array.forEach(v => delete v.bad); Aug 29 '19 at 21:57
15

If you use underscore.js:

var strippedRows = _.map(rows, function (row) {
    return _.omit(row, ['bad', 'anotherbad']);
});
1
  • _.omit is being removed in Lodash v5 as far as I'm aware
    – Drenai
    Jul 23 at 16:00
10

For my opinion this is the simplest variant

array.map(({good}) => ({good}))
1
  • 12
    the question was about removing the bad, not keeping the good. If your objects have 10 fields to keep and one to remove, the above becomes really long to type.
    – adrien
    Feb 2 '19 at 13:53
9

You can follow this, more readable, not expectation raise due to key not found :

data.map((datum) => {
  return {
    'id':datum.id,
    'title':datum.login
  }
});
8

A solution using prototypes is only possible when your objects are alike:

function Cons(g) { this.good = g; }
Cons.prototype.bad = "something common";
var array = [new Cons("something 1"), new Cons("something 2"), …];

But then it's simple (and O(1)):

delete Cons.prototype.bad;
2

This question is a bit old now, but I would like to offer an alternative solution that doesn't mutate source data and requires minimal manual effort:

function mapOut(sourceObject, removeKeys = []) {
  const sourceKeys = Object.keys(sourceObject);
  const returnKeys = sourceKeys.filter(k => !removeKeys.includes(k));
  let returnObject = {};
  returnKeys.forEach(k => {
    returnObject[k] = sourceObject[k];
  });
  return returnObject;
}

const array = [
  {"bad": "something", "good":"something"},
  {"bad":"something", "good":"something"},
];

const newArray = array.map(obj => mapOut(obj, [ "bad", ]));

It's still a little less than perfect, but maintains some level of immutability and has the flexibility to name multiple properties that you want to remove. (Suggestions welcome)

2

The shortest way in ES6:

array.forEach(e => {delete e.someKey});
1

ES6:

const newArray = array.map(({keepAttr1, keepAttr2}) => ({keepAttr1, newPropName: keepAttr2}))
0

I will suggest to use Object.assign within a forEach() loop so that the objects are copied and does not affect the original array of objects

var res = [];
array.forEach(function(item) { 
    var tempItem = Object.assign({}, item);
    delete tempItem.bad; 
    res.push(tempItem);
});
console.log(res);
0

This works well for me!

export function removePropertiesFromArrayOfObjects(arr = [], properties = []) {
return arr.map(i => {
    const newItem = {}
    Object.keys(i).map(key => {
        if (properties.includes(key)) { newItem[key] = i[key] }
    })
    return newItem
})

}

-1

i have tried with craeting a new object without deleting the coulmns in Vue.js.

let data =this.selectedContactsDto[];

//selectedContactsDto[] = object with list of array objects created in my project

console.log(data); let newDataObj= data.map(({groupsList,customFields,firstname, ...item }) => item); console.log("newDataObj",newDataObj);

-1

To remove some key value pair form object array uses Postgres SQL as database like this example:

This is user function return user details object, we have to remove "api_secret" key from rows :

    function getCurrentUser(req, res, next) { // user function
    var userId = res.locals.userId;
    console.log(userId)
    db.runSQLWithParams("select * from users where id = $1", [userId], function(err, rows) {
      if(err){
        console.log(err)
      }
      var responseObject = {
        _embedded: rows,
      }
      responseObject._embedded[0].api_secret = undefined
      // console.log(api);
      // console.log(responseObject);
      res.json(responseObject);
    }); 
}

The above function return below object as JSON response before

 {
    "_embedded": [
        {
            "id": "0123abd-345gfhgjf-dajd4456kkdj",
            "secret_key: "secret",
            "email": "abcd@email.com",
            "created": "2020-08-18T00:13:16.077Z"
        }
    ]
}

After adding this line responseObject._embedded[0].api_secret = undefined It gives below result as JSON response:

{
        "_embedded": [
            {
                "id": "0123abd-345gfhgjf-dajd4456kkdj",
                "email": "abcd@email.com",
                "created": "2020-08-18T00:13:16.077Z"
            }
        ]
    }
2
  • it return null to array Feb 7 at 23:09
  • Please share your code sample if possible. It helps to understand issue Feb 11 at 12:13
-1

There are plenty of libraries out there. It all depends on how complicated your data structure is (e.g. consider deeply nested keys)

We like object-fields as it also works with deeply nested hierarchies (build for api fields parameter). Here is a simple code example

// const objectFields = require('object-fields');

const array = [ { bad: 'something', good: 'something' }, { bad: 'something', good: 'something' } ];

const retain = objectFields.Retainer(['good']);
retain(array);
console.log(array);
// => [ { good: 'something' }, { good: 'something' } ]
.as-console-wrapper {max-height: 100% !important; top: 0}
<script src="https://bundle.run/object-fields@2.0.19"></script>

Disclaimer: I'm the author of object-fields

-5

var array = [{"bad": "something", "good":"something"},{"bad":"something", "good":"something"}];
var results = array.map(function(item){
  return {good : item["good"]}
});
console.log(JSON.stringify(results));

5
  • Could you explain your solution?
    – sg7
    Apr 1 '18 at 22:08
  • Map is a new data structure in JavaScript ES6. Attached link might help you. hackernoon.com/what-you-should-know-about-es6-maps-dc66af6b9a1e
    – hk_y
    Apr 2 '18 at 13:12
  • this solution isn't good if you have many props in your items.
    – Koop4
    Apr 18 '18 at 14:41
  • Yes! Tried to provide a different approach.
    – hk_y
    Apr 19 '18 at 15:19
  • In your comment, you're confusing Map, the data structure which you're not using, with Array.prototype.map, the array method, which you're using. Jun 15 at 17:34

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