I have a several Makefiles in app specific directories like this:

/project1/apps/app_typeA/Makefile
/project1/apps/app_typeB/Makefile
/project1/apps/app_typeC/Makefile

Each Makefile includes a .inc file in this path one level up:

/project1/apps/app_rules.inc

Inside app_rules.inc I'm setting the destination of where I want the binaries to be placed when built. I want all binaries to be in their respective app_type path:

/project1/bin/app_typeA/

I tried using $(CURDIR), like this:

OUTPUT_PATH = /project1/bin/$(CURDIR)

but instead I got the binaries buried in the entire path name like this: (notice the redundancy)

/project1/bin/projects/users/bob/project1/apps/app_typeA

What can I do to get the "current directory" of execution so that I can know just the app_typeX in order to put the binaries in their respective types folder?

10 Answers 10

up vote 185 down vote accepted

The shell function.

You can use shell function: current_dir = $(shell pwd). Or shell in combination with notdir, if you need not absolute path: current_dir = $(notdir $(shell pwd)).

Update.

Given solution only works when you are running make from the Makefile's current directory.
As @Flimm noted:

Note that this returns the current working directory, not the parent directory of the Makefile.
For example, if you run cd /; make -f /home/username/project/Makefile, the current_dir variable will be /, not /home/username/project/.

Code below will work for any for Makefiles invoked from any directory:

mkfile_path := $(abspath $(lastword $(MAKEFILE_LIST)))
current_dir := $(notdir $(patsubst %/,%,$(dir $(mkfile_path))))
  • 5
    That does not work. It is the same problem. pwd prints the full path name, I just want the name of the actual current folder I'm in. – boltup_im_coding Aug 8 '13 at 22:13
  • @unexpected62 What about notdir? – Nikolai Popov Aug 8 '13 at 22:18
  • @unexpected62 See the updated answer. – Nikolai Popov Aug 8 '13 at 22:20
  • 5
    It needs to have the value expanded immediately so the := operator should be used. As in mkfile_path := and current_dir = (otherwise the right side values could be evaluated later when the MAKEFILE_LIST has changed after other Makefiles were included – Tom Gruner Mar 22 '14 at 4:55
  • 9
    I know this is an old question but I just ran into and thought this could be useful. This also will not work when there is a space in the relative path of the makefile. Specifically, $(lastword "$(MAKEFILE_LIST)") of a makefile at path "Sub Directory/Makefile" will give you "Directory/Makefile". I dont think there is any way around this since $(MAKEFILE_LIST) with two makefiles gives you a single string "Makefile One Makefile Two, which cannot handle spaces – mrosales Jan 24 '15 at 17:05

As taken from here;

ROOT_DIR:=$(shell dirname $(realpath $(lastword $(MAKEFILE_LIST))))

Shows up as;

$ cd /home/user/

$ make -f test/Makefile 
/home/user/test

$ cd test; make Makefile 
/home/user/test

Hope this helps

  • 2
    IMHO it would better to use internal make-function dir instead of shell dirname though it gets pathname with trailing / character. – Serge Roussak Jan 23 '15 at 15:13
  • 3
    because of reduction of dependancies on external tools. Ie what if there will alias of dirname command at some system?.. – Serge Roussak Jan 23 '15 at 20:27
  • 4
    This almost worked for me, but DIR had a leading whitespace, so a minor change made work perfectly: DIR:=$(strip $(shell dirname $(realpath $(lastword $(MAKEFILE_LIST))))) – Thorsten Lorenz May 2 '15 at 21:28
  • 7
    To reference the current makefile, the use of $MAKEFILE_LIST must precede any include operations (docs). – nobar Nov 11 '15 at 4:11
  • 2
    Should use quotes -- at least around the argument to dirname -- in case there are spaces in the path. – nobar Nov 11 '15 at 4:21

If you are using GNU make, $(CURDIR) is actually a built-in variable. It is the location where the Makefile resides the current working directory, which is probably where the Makefile is, but not always.

OUTPUT_PATH = /project1/bin/$(notdir $(CURDIR))

See Appendix A Quick Reference in http://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html

  • 16
    From the GNU Make manual (page 51): " when GNU make starts (after it has processed any -C options) it sets the variable CURDIR to the pathname of the current working directory." Not the location of where the Makefile is located - although, they might be the same. – Simon Peverett Apr 23 '14 at 7:31
  • 4
    Downvoted because the answer is not technically correct, as noted by Simon Peverett in the previous comment. – Subfuzion Dec 31 '14 at 2:20
  • 5
    @SimonPeverett: The expression in brackets means the the "current working directory AFTER -C opts applied". Namely $(CURDIR) gives the exactly the same results for "make -C xxx" and "cd xxx; make". Also it removes the trailing /. I tried tied with gmake v3.81. But You are right if make is called as make -f xxx/Makefile. – TrueY Apr 1 '15 at 9:41
  • CURDIR works for me where PWD did not. I did mkdir -p a/s/d then in each folder had a makefile which printed PWD and CURDIR before +$(MAKE) <subdir>. – Mark K Cowan Mar 25 '17 at 22:46
THIS_DIR := $(dir $(abspath $(lastword $(MAKEFILE_LIST))))
  • 9
    ... unless you have spaces in any paths. – Craig Ringer Mar 16 '15 at 11:56
  • 7
    ... unless you have included some other makefile in previous line – robal Oct 9 '15 at 16:56
  • 1
    @robal Yep. That is what I just encountered. This works great if you only have two Makefiles (the main one plus an included one). – sherrellbc Apr 20 at 21:38

I tried many of these answers, but on my AIX system with gnu make 3.80 I needed to do some things old school.

Turns out that lastword, abspath and realpath were not added until 3.81. :(

mkfile_path := $(word $(words $(MAKEFILE_LIST)),$(MAKEFILE_LIST))
mkfile_dir:=$(shell cd $(shell dirname $(mkfile_path)); pwd)
current_dir:=$(notdir $(mkfile_dir))

As others have said, not the most elegant as it invokes a shell twice, and it still has the spaces issues.

But as I don't have any spaces in my paths, it works for me regardless of how I started make:

  • make -f ../wherever/makefile
  • make -C ../wherever
  • make -C ~/wherever
  • cd ../wherever; make

All give me wherever for current_dir and the absolute path to wherever for mkfile_dir.

  • I, for one, have compiled gnu-make-3.82 on aix (5-6-7) without problems. – Zsigmond Lőrinczy Jan 7 '16 at 6:08
  • Yes, by 3.81 the needed functions for the earlier solutions were implemented. My answer is for older systems with 3.80 or earlier. Sadly, at work I am not allowed to add or upgrade tools to the AIX system. :( – Jesse Chisholm Jan 8 '16 at 13:01

I like the chosen answer, but I think it would be more helpful to actually show it working than explain it.

/tmp/makefile_path_test.sh

#!/bin/bash -eu

# Create a testing dir
temp_dir=/tmp/makefile_path_test
proj_dir=$temp_dir/dir1/dir2/dir3
mkdir -p $proj_dir

# Create the Makefile in $proj_dir
# (Because of this, $proj_dir is what $(path) should evaluate to.)
cat > $proj_dir/Makefile <<'EOF'
path := $(patsubst %/,%,$(dir $(abspath $(lastword $(MAKEFILE_LIST)))))
cwd  := $(shell pwd)

all:
    @echo "MAKEFILE_LIST: $(MAKEFILE_LIST)"
    @echo "         path: $(path)"
    @echo "          cwd: $(cwd)"
    @echo ""
EOF

# See/debug each command
set -x

# Test using the Makefile in the current directory
cd $proj_dir
make

# Test passing a Makefile
cd $temp_dir
make -f $proj_dir/Makefile

# Cleanup
rm -rf $temp_dir

Output:

+ cd /tmp/makefile_path_test/dir1/dir2/dir3
+ make
MAKEFILE_LIST:  Makefile
         path: /private/tmp/makefile_path_test/dir1/dir2/dir3
          cwd: /tmp/makefile_path_test/dir1/dir2/dir3

+ cd /tmp/makefile_path_test
+ make -f /tmp/makefile_path_test/dir1/dir2/dir3/Makefile
MAKEFILE_LIST:  /tmp/makefile_path_test/dir1/dir2/dir3/Makefile
         path: /tmp/makefile_path_test/dir1/dir2/dir3
          cwd: /tmp/makefile_path_test

+ rm -rf /tmp/makefile_path_test

NOTE: The function $(patsubst %/,%,[path/goes/here/]) is used to strip the trailing slash.

Example for your reference, as below:

The folder structure might be as:

enter image description here

Where there are two Makefiles, each as below;

sample/Makefile
test/Makefile

Now, let us see the content of the Makefiles.

sample/Makefile

export ROOT_DIR=${PWD}

all:
    echo ${ROOT_DIR}
    $(MAKE) -C test

test/Makefile

all:
    echo ${ROOT_DIR}
    echo "make test ends here !"

Now, execute the sample/Makefile, as;

cd sample
make

OUTPUT:

echo /home/symphony/sample
/home/symphony/sample
make -C test
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/symphony/sample/test'
echo /home/symphony/sample
/home/symphony/sample
echo "make test ends here !"
make test ends here !
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/symphony/sample/test'

Explanation, would be that the parent/home directory can be stored in the environment-flag, and can be exported, so that it can be used in all the sub-directory makefiles.

  • 1
    This gets the current working directory, not the makefile's home directory. – Jesse Chisholm Jan 8 '16 at 13:01
  • These are the lines in the Makefile. Now, as the Makefile command executes, this will get the path at which the Makefile is. I understand "makefile home directory" is refering to the same, i.e. the directory-path in which Makefile is executing. – parasrish Jan 8 '16 at 18:34
  • @Jesse Chisholm please revisit. I have explained with usage. – parasrish Jan 18 '16 at 14:54
  • 1
    Screenshots are bad, copy-paste good. – peterh Aug 15 '16 at 12:26

Here is one-liner to get absolute path to your Makefile file using shell syntax:

SHELL := /bin/bash
CWD := $(shell cd -P -- '$(shell dirname -- "$0")' && pwd -P)

And here is version without shell based on @0xff answer:

CWD=$(abspath $(patsubst %/,%,$(dir $(abspath $(lastword $(MAKEFILE_LIST))))))

Test it by printing it, like:

cwd:
        @echo $(CWD)

If the make variable contain the Relative path is ROOT_DIR

ROOT_DIR := ../../../

Them to get the absolute path just use below method.

ROOT_DIR := $(abspath $(ROOT_DIR))

Its work fine in GNUMake...

update 2018/03/05 finnaly I use this:


shellPath=`echo $PWD/``echo ${0%/*}`

# process absolute path
shellPath1=`echo $PWD/`
shellPath2=`echo ${0%/*}`
if [ ${shellPath2:0:1} == '/' ] ; then
    shellPath=${shellPath2}
fi

It can be executed correct in relative path or absolute path. Executed correct invoked by crontab. Executed correct in other shell.

show example, a.sh print self path.

[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# more /root/test/a.sh
shellPath=`echo $PWD/``echo ${0%/*}`

# process absolute path
shellPath1=`echo $PWD/`
shellPath2=`echo ${0%/*}`
if [ ${shellPath2:0:1} == '/' ] ; then
    shellPath=${shellPath2}
fi

echo $shellPath
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# more /root/b.sh
shellPath=`echo $PWD/``echo ${0%/*}`

# process absolute path
shellPath1=`echo $PWD/`
shellPath2=`echo ${0%/*}`
if [ ${shellPath2:0:1} == '/' ] ; then
    shellPath=${shellPath2}
fi

$shellPath/test/a.sh
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# ~/b.sh
/root/test
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# /root/b.sh
/root/test
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# cd ~
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz ~]# ./b.sh
/root/./test
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz ~]# test/a.sh
/root/test
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz ~]# cd test
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz test]# ./a.sh
/root/test/.
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz test]# cd /
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# /root/test/a.sh
/root/test
[root@izbp1a7wyzv7b5hitowq2yz /]# 

old: I use this:

MAKEFILE_PATH := $(PWD)/$({0%/*})

It can show correct if executed in other shell and other directory.

  • 1
    "It can show correct if executed if other shell and other directory" doesn't make sense in English. Can you try explaining again? – Keith M Mar 16 '17 at 21:37
  • sorry for my poor english – zhukunqian Mar 17 '17 at 7:27
  • Thanks for the edit, I see you meant IN now. Can you explain what this does before I try it? I'm not sure how to use it. Like what do you mean by "other shell" – Keith M Mar 17 '17 at 23:02

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