36
public static void main(String args[]) {
    myMethod(); // i am calling static method from main()
 }

.

public static ? myMethod(){ // ? = what should be the return type
    return value;// is String
    return index;// is int
}

myMethod() will return String and int value. So take these returning values from main() i came up with following solution.

create a class call ReturningValues

public class ReturningValues {
private String value;
private int index;

// getters and setters here
}

and change myMethod() as follows.

 public static ReturningValues myMethod() {
    ReturningValues rv = new ReturningValues();
    rv.setValue("value");
    rv.setIndex(12);
    return rv;
}

Now my question,is there any easier way to achieve this??

2
  • 1
    You could use Properties or HashMap or even List, but I thing your ReturnValues is more appropriate as it's unambiguous as to what the method will return Aug 9, 2013 at 6:12
  • How are index and value related?
    – Rohit Jain
    Aug 9, 2013 at 6:13

14 Answers 14

25

I create various return types using enum. It doesn't defined automatically. That implementation look like factory pattern.

public  enum  SmartReturn {

    IntegerType, DoubleType;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public <T> T comeback(String value) {
        switch (this) {
            case IntegerType:
                return (T) Integer.valueOf(value);
            case DoubleType:
                return (T) Double.valueOf(value);
            default:
                return null;
        }
    }
}

Unit Test:

public class MultipleReturnTypeTest {

  @Test
  public void returnIntegerOrString() {
     Assert.assertTrue(SmartReturn.IntegerType.comeback("1") instanceof Integer);
     Assert.assertTrue(SmartReturn.DoubleType.comeback("1") instanceof Double);
  }

}
1
  • 4
    Personally I think using an enum like a method looks kind of weird. More like a hack.
    – Johann
    Feb 20, 2018 at 18:29
18

No. Java methods can only return one result (void, a primitive, or an object), and creating a struct-type class like this is exactly how you do it.

As a note, it is frequently possible to make classes like your ReturningValues immutable like this:

public class ReturningValues {
    public final String value;
    public final int index;

    public ReturningValues(String value, int index) {
        this.value = value;
        this.index = index;
    }
}

This has the advantage that a ReturningValues can be passed around, such as between threads, with no concerns about accidentally getting things out of sync.

1
7

Generally if you are not sure of what value you will end up returning, you should consider using return-type as super-class of all the return values. In this case, where you need to return String or int, consider returning Object class(which is the base class of all the classes defined in java).

But be careful to have instanceof checks where you are calling this method. Or else you may end up getting ClassCastException.

public static void main(String args[]) {
        Object obj = myMethod(); // i am calling static method from main() which return Object
    if(obj instanceof String){
    // Do something
    }else(obj instance of Integer) {
    //do something else
     }
3

the approach you took is good. Just Implementation may need to be better. For instance ReturningValues should be well defined and Its better if you can make ReturningValues as immutable.

// this approach is better
public static ReturningValues myMethod() {
    ReturningValues rv = new ReturningValues("value", 12);
    return rv;
}


public final class ReturningValues {
    private final String value;
    private final int index;


    public ReturningValues(String value, int index) {
      this.value = value;
      this.index = index;
     }

} 

Or if you have lots of key value pairs you can use HashMap then

public static Map<String,Object> myMethod() {
  Map<String,Object> map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
  map.put(VALUE, "value");
  map.put(INDEX, 12);
  return Collections.unmodifiableMap(map); // try to use this 
}
1
  • If your index and value fields are private, you need to add getters to access them.
    – ndm13
    Oct 18, 2017 at 14:31
2

The class you're looking for already exists. Map.Entry:

public static Entry<Integer,String> myMethod(){
    return new SimpleEntry<>(12, "value");
}

And later:

Entry<Integer,String> valueAndIndex = myMethod();
int index = valueAndIndex.getKey();
String value = valueAndIndex.getValue();

It's just a simple two-field data structure that stores a key and value. If you need to do any special processing, store more than two fields, or have any other fringe case, you should make your own class, but otherwise, Map.Entry is one of the more underutilized Java classes and is perfect for situations like these.

1

This can be one of the solution. But your present solution is good enough. You can also add new variables and still keep it clean, which cannot be done with present code.

private static final int INDEX_OF_STRING_PARAM = 0;
private static final int INDEX_OF_INT_PARAM = 1;

public static Object[] myMethod() {
    Object[] values = new Object[2];
    values[INDEX_OF_STRING_PARAM] = "value";
    values[INDEX_OF_INT_PARAM] = 12;
    return values;
}
2
  • This will work, but it's much less type-safe and more difficult to read. Aug 9, 2013 at 6:15
  • @chrylis Yes I agree totally. I have mentioned that only limited to two or three return values the present code will be manageable. But the better one is the one by OP as it is type safe and more understandable. Aug 9, 2013 at 6:17
1

I know this is late but I thought it'd be helpful to someone who'll come searching for an answer to this. You can use a Bundle to return multiple datatype values without creating another method. I tried it and worked perfectly.

In Your MainActivity where you call the method:

Bundle myBundle = method();
String myString = myBundle.getString("myS");
String myInt = myBundle.getInt("myI");

Method:

public Bundle method() {
    mBundle = new Bundle();
    String typicalString = "This is String";
    Int typicalInt = 1;
    mBundle.putString("myS", typicalString);
    mBundle.putInt("myI", typicalInt);
    return mBundle;
}

P.S: I'm not sure if it's OK to implement a Bundle like this, but for me, it worked out perfectly.

1

I just want to put my view

So you need to create a generic Return type and implemented by different types of concret return types. The Service class can create different types of objects concrete class and return as a generic type.

public interface GenericReturnType{
    public static RETURN_TYPE enum{
        MACHINE, PERSON;    
    }
    public RETURN_TYPE getReturnType();
}

public class PersonReturnType implements GenericReturnType{
    // CONSTRUCTORS //

    // GETTRE AND SETTER //

    public RETURN_TYPE getReturnType(){
        return PERSON;
    }
    public String getAddress(){
        return something;
    }
}

public class MachineReturnType implements GenericReturnType{
    // CONSTRUCTORS //

    // GETTRE AND SETTER //

    public RETURN_TYPE getReturnType(){
        return MACHINE;
    }
    public String getManufatureName(){
        return something;
    }
}


public class TestService{
    public GenericReturnType getObject(// some input //){
        GenericReturnType obj ;
        if(// some code //){
            obj = new  PersonReturnType();
            // some code //
        }
        if(// some code //){
            obj = new  MachineReturnType();
            // some code //
        }
        return obj;
    }
}

public class TestDriver{
    TestService service = new TestService();
    GenericReturnType genObj = TestService.getObject(// some input //);
    if(genObj.getReturnType() == RETURN_TYPE.MACHINE){
        // SOME CODE // 
    }
    if(genObj.getReturnType() == RETURN_TYPE.PERSON){
        // SOME CODE // 
    }
}
0

Finally i thought my way is better since when number of return types go higher this kind of a implementation do that in best way.

public static ReturningValues myMethod() {
ReturningValues rv = new ReturningValues();
rv.setValue("value");
rv.setIndex(12);
return rv;
}
0

@ruchira ur solution it self is best.But i think if it is only about integer and a string we can do it in much easy and simple way..

 class B {   
    public String myfun() {         
        int a=2;           //Integer .. you could use scanner or pass parameters ..i have simply assigned
        String b="hi";      //String
        return Integer.toString(a)+","+b; //returnig string and int with "," in middle          
    }       
}

class A {    
    public static void main(String args[]){

        B obj=new B();  // obj of class B with myfun() method  
        String returned[]=obj.myfun().split(",");
             //splitting integer and string values with "," and storing them in array   
        int b1=Integer.parseInt(returned[0]); //converting first value in array to integer.    
        System.out.println(returned[0]); //printing integer    
        System.out.println(returned[1]); //printing String
    }
}

i hope it was useful.. :)

0

you can have the return as an object. You create that object 'on fly' in your

function: if(int) 
 return new object(){
   int nr=..
}

same for string. But I am concerned that is an expensive solution...

0

public ArrayList divineCast(String object) {  
        try
        {
            Integer result = Integer.parseInt(object);
            ArrayList<Integer> generic = new   ArrayList<Integer>();
            generic.add(result);
            return generic;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            //not a Integer
        }
        try
        {
            Float result = Float.parseFloat(object);
            ArrayList<Float> generic = new   ArrayList<Float>();
            generic.add(result);
            return generic;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            //not a Float
        }
        try
        {
            Double result = Double.parseDouble(object);
            ArrayList<Double> generic = new   ArrayList<Double>();
            generic.add(result);
            return generic;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            //not a double
        }
        try
        {
            Boolean result = Boolean.parseBoolean(object);
            ArrayList<Boolean> generic = new   ArrayList<Boolean>();
            generic.add(result);
            return generic;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            //not a Boolean
        }
        try
        {
            String result = String.valueOf(object);
            ArrayList<String> generic = new   ArrayList<String>();
            generic.add(result);
            return generic;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            //not a String
        }
        return null;

    }

Then you can call then function as so

String test1 = "0.90854938";
String test2 = "true";
System.out.println(divineCast(test1).get(0));
System.out.println(divineCast(test1).get(0).getClass());
System.out.println(divineCast(test2).get(0));
System.out.println(divineCast(test2).get(0).getClass());

Java doesn't force you to declare the type of ArrayList you are returning in the function declaration, so you can return an ArrayList of any type.

0

One solution can be as follows. The function can be defined as follows (the number/type of inputs can be arbitrage)

static List<Object> multiTypeInputOut (int a, double b, String c, List<Object> d)
{
    List<Object> multiTypes = new ArrayList<>();
    multiTypes.add(a);
    multiTypes.add(b);
    multiTypes.add(c);
    multiTypes.add(d);
    return multiTypes; 
}

When call such method/function, the example will be as follows (only the order of the types returned should be remembered and set correctly):

   List<Object> HelloWorldStrList = new ArrayList<Object>(Arrays.asList("Welcome", "Hello", "World"));
   List<Object>  multiType = multiTypeInputOut (1, 2.1, "HelloWorld",  HelloWorldStrList);
   int entry1 = (int) multiType.get(0);
   double entry2 = (double) multiType.get(1);
   String entry3 = (String) multiType.get(2);
   List<Object>  entry4 = (List<Object>) multiType.get(3);
-1

Method overloading can come in handy here Like:

<code>
public class myClass 
{
    int add(int a, int b) 
    {
         return (a + b);
    }

    String add(String a, String b)
    {
         return (c + d);
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) 
    {
        myClass ob1 = new myClass);
        ob1.add(2, 3);
        //will return 5
        ob1.add("Hello, ", "World!");
        //will return Hello, World!
    }

}

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