53

I tried to replace NaN values with zeros using the following script:

rapply( data123, f=function(x) ifelse(is.nan(x),0,x), how="replace" )
# [31]   0.00000000  -0.67994832   0.50287454   0.63979527   1.48410571  -2.90402836

The NaN value was showing to be zero but when I typed in the name of the data frame and tried to review it, the value was still remaining NaN.

data123$contri_us
# [31]          NaN  -0.67994832   0.50287454   0.63979527   1.48410571  -2.90402836

I am not sure whether the rapply command was actually applying the adjustment in the data frame, or just replaced the value as per shown.

Any idea how to actually change the NaN value to zero?

2
  • 4
    You can't just do data123[is.nan(data123)] <- 0? – Hong Ooi Aug 9 '13 at 7:43
  • 8
    I tried but R gave the the following error message: > Error in is.nan(data123) : default method not implemented for type 'list' – cactussss Aug 9 '13 at 8:39
105

It would seem that is.nan doesn't actually have a method for data frames, unlike is.na. So, let's fix that!

is.nan.data.frame <- function(x)
do.call(cbind, lapply(x, is.nan))

data123[is.nan(data123)] <- 0
2
  • 7
    Your bottom function should be "is.nan.data.frame". – Concerned_Citizen Jan 29 '14 at 5:27
  • 32
    @Dombey That isn't required; by the magic of method dispatch, is.nan.data.frame will be called automatically. – Hong Ooi Mar 13 '14 at 18:59
36

In fact, in R, this operation is very easy:

If the matrix 'a' contains some NaN, you just need to use the following code to replace it by 0:

a <- matrix(c(1, NaN, 2, NaN), ncol=2, nrow=2)
a[is.nan(a)] <- 0
a

If the data frame 'b' contains some NaN, you just need to use the following code to replace it by 0:

#for a data.frame: 
b <- data.frame(c1=c(1, NaN, 2), c2=c(NaN, 2, 7))
b[is.na(b)] <- 0
b

Note the difference is.nan when it's a matrix vs. is.na when it's a data frame.

Doing

#...
b[is.nan(b)] <- 0
#...

yields: Error in is.nan(b) : default method not implemented for type 'list' because b is a data frame.

Note: Edited for small but confusing typos

3
  • 11
    This explanation is wrong. A NA is not the data frame equivalent of a NaN. – Hong Ooi Nov 8 '18 at 12:43
  • Wrong answer. Agreed. – SmallChess Jan 10 '19 at 6:59
  • This answer is applicable when you are dealing only with numbers and NaN, or if you want to treat NA as NaN, because is.na(NaN) == TRUE. – Roman Zenka Apr 1 at 13:43
24

The following should do what you want:

x <- data.frame(X1=sample(c(1:3,NaN), 200, replace=TRUE), X2=sample(c(4:6,NaN), 200, replace=TRUE))
head(x)
x <- replace(x, is.na(x), 0)
head(x)
0
8

Here is a tidyverse solution. I've generated sample data with both NaN and NA. The first column is fully complete.

df <- tibble(x = LETTERS[1:5],
             y = c(1:3, NaN, 4),
             z = c(rep(NaN, 3), NA, 5))

> df
# A tibble: 5 x 3
  x         y     z
  <chr> <dbl> <dbl>
1 A         1   NaN
2 B         2   NaN
3 C         3   NaN
4 D       NaN    NA
5 E         4     5

Then we can apply mutate_all with replace to the dataframe:

> df %>% 
+   mutate_all(~replace(., is.nan(.), 0))
# A tibble: 5 x 3
  x         y     z
  <chr> <dbl> <dbl>
1 A         1     0
2 B         2     0
3 C         3     0
4 D         0    NA 
5 E         4     5

We've replaced NaN values with zero and touched neither NA values nor the x column.

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