147
~/src/go-statsd-client> echo $GOPATH
/Users/me/gopath
~/src/go-statsd-client> echo $GOROOT
/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.1.1\
~/src/go-statsd-client> go install
go install: no install location for directory /Users/me/src/go-statsd-client outside GOPATH

No matter what structure the project is in this always fails with the same message. Go build works perfectly.

Here is my go env

GOARCH="amd64"
GOBIN=""
GOCHAR="6"
GOEXE=""
GOHOSTARCH="amd64"
GOHOSTOS="darwin"
GOOS="darwin"
GOPATH="/Users/me/gopath"
GORACE=""
GOROOT="/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.1.1"
GOTOOLDIR="/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.1.1/pkg/tool/darwin_amd64"
CC="gcc"
GOGCCFLAGS="-g -O2 -fPIC -m64 -pthread -fno-common"
CGO_ENABLED="1"

This is on Mac OSX Mountain Lion and go was installed with homebrew.

13 Answers 13

112

When you provide no arguments to go install, it defaults to attempting to install the package in the current directory. The error message is telling you that it cannot do that, because the current directory isn't part of your $GOPATH.

You can either:

  • Define $GOPATH to your $HOME (export GOPATH=$HOME).
  • Move your source to within the current $GOPATH (mv ~/src/go-statsd-client /User/me/gopath).

After either, going into the go-statsd-client directory and typing go install will work, and so will typing go install go-statsd-client from anywhere in the filesystem. The built binaries will go into $GOPATH/bin.

As an unrelated suggestion, you probably want to namespace your package with a domain name, to avoid name clashing (e.g. github.com/you/go-statsd-client, if that's where you hold your source code).

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    In my case this error was caused by there not being a $GOPATH/bin directory. Creating this folder was that was needed -- I didn't need to set GOBIN env var. – xentek Jan 21 '15 at 7:20
  • 3
    @RobertReiz while I share your frustration, I should point out that most other languages do in fact use these, but maybe they're not as visible. For example, Python (a language famous for its simplicity) has PYTHONHOME instead of GOROOT and PYTHONPATH instead of GOPATH. Even (GC)C has LIBRARY_PATH, C_INCLUDE_PATH, etc. – Hut8 Jan 31 '16 at 0:48
  • 1
    I get this error after export GOPATH=$PWD (standing at the root of a Golang clone tree), your answer can't possibly explain the error in this case. – ulidtko Jul 1 '16 at 11:19
  • 1
    For me, putting it in $GOPATH was not enough. It needed to be in a directory under $GOPATH/src/ – Thomas Nov 5 '16 at 11:15
  • 7
    I'm sure there is some very good reason to justify the existence of GOPATH, but from the outside looking in, this seems completely mindless. Why do I have to mutate global environment variables just to build a package locally 🤔 – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Apr 24 '18 at 22:07
185

For any OS X users and future me, you also need to set GOBIN to avoid this confusing message on install and go get

mkdir bin 
export GOBIN=$GOPATH/bin
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    You should not need to set GOBIN. If setting it to $GOPATH/bin makes a difference, then something else is wrong with your setup or you're doing something you shouldn't. – Dave C Sep 2 '15 at 18:32
  • 27
    @DaveC I too have the same problem on OS X. Setting the GOBIN fixed it. – nJoshi Dec 27 '15 at 3:18
  • 2
    Thank you so much, it looks like something with the official OS X package is wrong indeed requiring you to set GOBIN, still valid for 10.11.4 (El Capitan) – Jonas D. Apr 30 '16 at 22:09
  • 3
    This is correct fix for Ubuntu 16.04 as well, with binary package from http://golang.org/dl/ – suside May 17 '16 at 6:19
  • 1
    This worked perfectly on maOS Sierra 10.12.3 Thanks! – Greg Hilston Feb 16 '17 at 19:42
29

You are using go install on a directory outside the GOPATH folder. Set your GOBIN env variable, or move src folder inside GOPATH.

GOPATH/
     bin/
     src/
       go-statsd-client/

More info: GO BUILD Source code, line 296

| improve this answer | |
  • I tried the suggestion above (export GOPATH=$HOME), then moved into my relevant directory (where I am writing my code) and typed go install ...same result go install: no install location for directory .... – stian Apr 16 '14 at 17:32
  • Line 296 is just a return statement? – Felix Rabe Oct 5 '14 at 19:23
  • 1
    I forgot to set my GOBIN env – cevaris Nov 22 '14 at 13:47
  • I went for this solution. – Mihamina Rakotomandimby Mar 30 '18 at 16:14
17

You need to setup both GOPATH and GOBIN. Make sure you have done the following (please replace ~/go with your preferred GOPATH and subsequently change GOBIN). This is tested on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

export GOPATH=~/go 

mkdir ~/go/bin

export GOBIN=$GOPATH/bin

The selected answer did not solve the problem for me.

| improve this answer | |
  • I have both defined in 16.04 and this did not work for me. – Catskul Mar 7 '18 at 17:10
5

You'll want to have 3 directories inside your chosen GOPATH directory.

GOPATH
     /bin
     /src
       /someProgram
        program.go
       /someLibrary
        library.go
     /pkg

Then you'll run go install from inside either someProgram (which puts an executable in bin) or someLibrary (which puts a library in pkg).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This worked for me after searching for 2 hours on internet. – vishalknishad Mar 8 '19 at 11:23
3

I had this problem on Windows.

My problem was that my %GOPATH% environment variable was set to

C:\Users\john\src\goworkspace

instead of

C:\Users\john\src\goworkspace\

Adding the missing trailing slash at the end fixed it for me.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    holy cow you just saved me from a potentially multi-hour headache. I'm on Ubuntu but had the same problem. Was extremely diligent about folder names, folder structure, prefacing with src/github.com/xyabz/ and everything but go install kept giving me errors. – anon58192932 Oct 7 '16 at 5:15
3

For what it's worth, here's my .bash_profile, that works well for me on a mac with Atom, after installing go with Homebrew:

export GOROOT=`go env GOROOT`
export GOPATH=/Users/yy/Projects/go
export GOBIN=$GOPATH/bin
export PATH=$PATH:$GOBIN
| improve this answer | |
2

In my case (OS X) it was because I have set GOPATH to /home/username/go (as per the book) instead of /Users/username/go

| improve this answer | |
2

I'm on Windows, and I got it by giving command go help gopath to cmd, and read the bold text in the instruction,

that is if code you wnat to install is at ..BaseDir...\SomeProject\src\basic\set, the GOPATH should not be the same location as code, it should be just Base Project DIR: ..BaseDir...\SomeProject.

The GOPATH environment variable lists places to look for Go code. On Unix, the value is a colon-separated string. On Windows, the value is a semicolon-separated string. On Plan 9, the value is a list.

If the environment variable is unset, GOPATH defaults to a subdirectory named "go" in the user's home directory ($HOME/go on Unix, %USERPROFILE%\go on Windows), unless that directory holds a Go distribution. Run "go env GOPATH" to see the current GOPATH.

See https://golang.org/wiki/SettingGOPATH to set a custom GOPATH.

Each directory listed in GOPATH must have a prescribed structure:

The src directory holds source code. The path below src determines the import path or executable name.

The pkg directory holds installed package objects. As in the Go tree, each target operating system and architecture pair has its own subdirectory of pkg (pkg/GOOS_GOARCH).

If DIR is a directory listed in the GOPATH, a package with source in DIR/src/foo/bar can be imported as "foo/bar" and has its compiled form installed to "DIR/pkg/GOOS_GOARCH/foo/bar.a".

The bin directory holds compiled commands. Each command is named for its source directory, but only the final element, not the entire path. That is, the command with source in DIR/src/foo/quux is installed into DIR/bin/quux, not DIR/bin/foo/quux. The "foo/" prefix is stripped so that you can add DIR/bin to your PATH to get at the installed commands. If the GOBIN environment variable is set, commands are installed to the directory it names instead of DIR/bin. GOBIN must be an absolute path.

Here's an example directory layout:

GOPATH=/home/user/go

/home/user/go/
    src/
        foo/
            bar/               (go code in package bar)
                x.go
            quux/              (go code in package main)
                y.go
    bin/
        quux                   (installed command)
    pkg/
        linux_amd64/
            foo/
                bar.a          (installed package object)

..........

if GOPATH has been set to Base Project DIR and still has this problem, in windows you can try to set GOBIN as Base Project DIR\bin or %GOPATH%\bin.

| improve this answer | |
1

Careful when running

export GOPATH=$HOME

Go assume that your code exists in specific places related to GOPATH. So, instead, you can use docker to run any go command:

docker run -it -v $(pwd):/go/src/github.com/<organization name>/<repository name> golang

And now you can use any golang command, for example:

go test github.com/<organization name>/<repository name> 
| improve this answer | |
0

In windows, my cmd window was already open when I set the GOPATH environment variable. First I had to close the cmd and then reopen for it to become effective.

| improve this answer | |
0

The problem is that you are not in the package directory that has the go file with the go main function and go install cannot find the command (go file with go main function) you want to install.

$ cd /path/to/file-with-main-function.go

and then run:

$ go install 
| improve this answer | |
-1

On OSX Mojave 10.14, go is typically installed at /usr/local/go.

Hence, setup these ENVs and you should be good to go.

export GOPATH=/usr/local/go && export GOBIN=/usr/local/go/bin

Also, add these to your bash_profile or zsh_profile if it works.

echo "export GOPATH=/usr/local/go && export GOBIN=/usr/local/go/bin" >> ~/.bash_profile && source ~/.bash_profile

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.