288

I have a script called foo.R that includes another script other.R, which is in the same directory:

#!/usr/bin/env Rscript
message("Hello")
source("other.R")

But I want R to find that other.R no matter what the current working directory.

In other words, foo.R needs to know its own path. How can I do that?

9
  • 2
    No. :( I haven't seen any solution that actually works. Apart from the workaround to just pass the directory in or use an environment variable.
    – Frank
    Dec 4, 2009 at 16:09
  • 4
    This would be amazing to make scripts fully portable and executable by even R neofites! Apr 3, 2012 at 18:15
  • 5
    It appears like all the answers require you to input the path at some point (at least to source the file)! It would be great if you could send someone a compressed folder and running any R script file within that folder would read from and save to that folder. Apr 3, 2012 at 18:18
  • 15
    this single issue could actually become te reason why I could completely move to Python
    – Giacomo
    Oct 29, 2017 at 12:47
  • 8
    @giac_man, I feel R is full of hundreds of tiny problems like this that all add up to making very difficult to work in. Oct 31, 2017 at 18:33

30 Answers 30

115

Here there is a simple solution for the problem. This command:

script.dir <- dirname(sys.frame(1)$ofile)

returns the path of the current script file. It works after the script was saved.

15
  • 8
    It doesn't work for me. I run R in Windows. Any idea?
    – Ehsan88
    Sep 25, 2014 at 12:38
  • 5
    Got the same error, with a saved scriptt and freshly installed and run R 3.2.0 on windows...
    – RalfB
    May 20, 2015 at 9:57
  • 34
    This error happens when you try to execute dirname(sys.frame(1)$ofile) directly from Rstudio. It works ok when the script is executed using source("other.R"), and dirname(sys.frame(1)$ofile) is inside "other.R".
    – Murta
    Jul 14, 2015 at 23:39
  • 13
    I got the 'not that many frames on the stack' error when calling as a script with rscript.exe i.e. not using source(). so I had to instead use the solution from Suppressingfire below Feb 25, 2016 at 16:49
  • 6
    I gel NULL when this is placed in server.R when using shiny
    – Paul
    Jan 18, 2017 at 20:24
80

You can use the commandArgs function to get all the options that were passed by Rscript to the actual R interpreter and search them for --file=. If your script was launched from the path or if it was launched with a full path, the script.name below will start with a '/'. Otherwise, it must be relative to the cwd and you can concat the two paths to get the full path.

Edit: it sounds like you'd only need the script.name above and to strip off the final component of the path. I've removed the unneeded cwd() sample and cleaned up the main script and posted my other.R. Just save off this script and the other.R script into the same directory, chmod +x them, and run the main script.

main.R:

#!/usr/bin/env Rscript
initial.options <- commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
file.arg.name <- "--file="
script.name <- sub(file.arg.name, "", initial.options[grep(file.arg.name, initial.options)])
script.basename <- dirname(script.name)
other.name <- file.path(script.basename, "other.R")
print(paste("Sourcing",other.name,"from",script.name))
source(other.name)

other.R:

print("hello")

output:

burner@firefighter:~$ main.R
[1] "Sourcing /home/burner/bin/other.R from /home/burner/bin/main.R"
[1] "hello"
burner@firefighter:~$ bin/main.R
[1] "Sourcing bin/other.R from bin/main.R"
[1] "hello"
burner@firefighter:~$ cd bin
burner@firefighter:~/bin$ main.R
[1] "Sourcing ./other.R from ./main.R"
[1] "hello"

This is what I believe dehmann is looking for.

7
  • 3
    I downmodded because your technique doesn't work with source as I thought the OP wanted - but maybe I misread his/her requirement. But I can't un-downmod :( Sorry!
    – hadley
    Nov 30, 2009 at 16:26
  • 1
    But actually, it does work fine with source! Just source(other.name) and it works properly. Dec 1, 2009 at 0:22
  • I think maybe we're talking at cross purposes. I think we have different understandings of what the dehmann is interested in doing. Dec 1, 2009 at 0:23
  • 3
    For path concatenation, better to use other.name <- file.path(script.basename, "other.R")
    – Jason
    Sep 9, 2014 at 14:34
  • 1
    When I try to run commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE) inside server.R in a shiny application, I get [1] "RStudio" "--interactive". No information about the directory it was called from.
    – Paul
    Jan 18, 2017 at 20:28
60

I couldn't get Suppressingfire's solution to work when 'source'ing from the R console.
I couldn't get hadley's solution to work when using Rscript.

Best of both worlds?

thisFile <- function() {
        cmdArgs <- commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
        needle <- "--file="
        match <- grep(needle, cmdArgs)
        if (length(match) > 0) {
                # Rscript
                return(normalizePath(sub(needle, "", cmdArgs[match])))
        } else {
                # 'source'd via R console
                return(normalizePath(sys.frames()[[1]]$ofile))
        }
}
7
  • 7
    I like this because it works with both Rscript and source() within R. I'd suggest doing normalizePath() on both versions, so that it gives the full path in both cases.
    – wch
    Nov 12, 2014 at 19:57
  • 1
    This is the only thing that worked. Note, for this to work library(base) took me a while to figure that out lol
    – O.rka
    Oct 4, 2016 at 18:32
  • 2
    you sir get my vote, because this is the solution that worked for me
    – Vince W.
    Mar 19, 2018 at 4:30
  • 2
    If this helps anyone, for the original post, that would mean source(file.path(dirname(thisFile()), "other.R")) in foo.R. This works for me.
    – Kim
    May 12, 2019 at 23:20
  • One issue. Suppose in RStudio I source main.R which sources helper.R which calls thisFile(). It will fetch the path of main.R instead of helper.R. Any tips here?
    – Wassadamo
    May 29, 2019 at 20:07
38
frame_files <- lapply(sys.frames(), function(x) x$ofile)
frame_files <- Filter(Negate(is.null), frame_files)
PATH <- dirname(frame_files[[length(frame_files)]])

Don't ask me how it works though, because I've forgotten :/

8
  • 2
    In what context does that work? print(sys.frames()) turns up NULL when I run it. Nov 30, 2009 at 5:21
  • 1
    @Suppressingfire: sys.frames returns the environments of the call stack, so it only really makes sense when called from a function. Try, e.g., foo <- function() {bar <- function() print(sys.frames()); bar()}; foo(). I can't figure out @hadley's code though because environments don't have an ofile member. Nov 30, 2009 at 11:27
  • 1
    You have to source the file in - i.e. if I save that code then run source("~/code/test.r"), PATH will be set to ~/desktop. If you just evaluate it at the top level, it will return NULL.
    – hadley
    Nov 30, 2009 at 16:24
  • 4
    This does not answer my question. I need to automatically find the "other.R" file. x$ofile is undefined, so frame_files is empty.
    – Frank
    Dec 4, 2009 at 16:08
  • @hadley, very useful code. I was able to generalize the "reload current script" utility function I add to almost all scripts when they are in active development. RScript reloader
    – Sim
    Jun 17, 2012 at 23:29
32

This works for me

library(rstudioapi)    
rstudioapi::getActiveDocumentContext()$path
3
  • 7
    This only works from inside RStudio I guess. Trying from the terminal I get Error: RStudio not running.
    – Ista
    Oct 8, 2018 at 11:26
  • more specifically it works, if run from a R script in R studio. Even on the console in RStudio it will not give the right result "" in my case
    – Kay
    May 19, 2020 at 12:14
  • This works while running interactively in Rstudio as long as you don't change the document in focus. If you submit lines to run and then switch to another document while they run, the path to the other document will be returned.
    – Patrick
    Jun 23, 2020 at 14:49
27

The answer of rakensi from Getting path of an R script is the most correct and really brilliant IMHO. Yet, it's still a hack incorporating a dummy function. I'm quoting it here, in order to have it easier found by others.

sourceDir <- getSrcDirectory(function(dummy) {dummy})

This gives the directory of the file where the statement was placed (where the dummy function is defined). It can then be used to set the working direcory and use relative paths e.g.

setwd(sourceDir)
source("other.R")

or to create absolute paths

 source(paste(sourceDir, "/other.R", sep=""))
5
  • 2
    For me, your solution was the best. Specially because it could be applied to a Shiny app and that one on link not.
    – jcarlos
    Apr 18, 2016 at 11:30
  • 1
    Here the getSrcDirectory is utils::getSrcDirectory Oct 25, 2016 at 7:53
  • 9
    This might work nicely under Linux/Mac, but it did not work for me in an interative RStudio session under Windows. sourceDir was blank.
    – Contango
    Aug 8, 2017 at 6:48
  • 1
    @Contango on an interactive terminal, there is no path!!! You want the path to a file. Jan 4, 2018 at 10:18
  • 2
    I'm getting character(0). Suggestions?
    – abalter
    Aug 1, 2019 at 20:38
19

My all in one! (--01/09/2019 updated to deal with RStudio Console)

#' current script file (in full path)
#' @description current script file (in full path)
#' @examples
#' works with Rscript, source() or in RStudio Run selection, RStudio Console
#' @export
ez.csf <- function() {
    # http://stackoverflow.com/a/32016824/2292993
    cmdArgs = commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
    needle = "--file="
    match = grep(needle, cmdArgs)
    if (length(match) > 0) {
        # Rscript via command line
        return(normalizePath(sub(needle, "", cmdArgs[match])))
    } else {
        ls_vars = ls(sys.frames()[[1]])
        if ("fileName" %in% ls_vars) {
            # Source'd via RStudio
            return(normalizePath(sys.frames()[[1]]$fileName))
        } else {
            if (!is.null(sys.frames()[[1]]$ofile)) {
            # Source'd via R console
            return(normalizePath(sys.frames()[[1]]$ofile))
            } else {
                # RStudio Run Selection
                # http://stackoverflow.com/a/35842176/2292993
                pth = rstudioapi::getActiveDocumentContext()$path
                if (pth!='') {
                    return(normalizePath(pth))
                } else {
                    # RStudio Console
                    tryCatch({
                            pth = rstudioapi::getSourceEditorContext()$path
                            pth = normalizePath(pth)
                        }, error = function(e) {
                            # normalizePath('') issues warning/error
                            pth = ''
                        }
                    )
                    return(pth)
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
4
  • Doesn't work with interactive R session; I'm getting: ``` > source("csf.R") > csf() Error: RStudio not running ``` Jul 6, 2017 at 23:57
  • This is great. Can someone make a package?
    – Joe Flack
    Jun 13, 2020 at 2:44
  • This works while running interactively in Rstudio as long as you don't change the document in focus. If you submit lines to run and then switch to another document while they run, the path to the other document will be returned.
    – Patrick
    Jun 23, 2020 at 14:53
  • 3
    @JoeFlack I've made a package for this called "this.path", you can find it on CRAN at CRAN.R-project.org/package=this.path
    – Andrew
    Dec 11, 2020 at 14:22
13

A slimmed down variant of Supressingfire's answer:

source_local <- function(fname){
    argv <- commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
    base_dir <- dirname(substring(argv[grep("--file=", argv)], 8))
    source(paste(base_dir, fname, sep="/"))
}
1
  • 1
    This did not work recursively; the file I source looks for a data file (but in the wrong directory). May 5, 2015 at 13:38
12

This works for me. Just greps it out of the command line arguments, strips off the unwanted text, does a dirname and finally gets the full path from that:

args <- commandArgs(trailingOnly = F)  
scriptPath <- normalizePath(dirname(sub("^--file=", "", args[grep("^--file=", args)])))
1
  • 1
    This is the correct answer. Really baffling how many people are wasting time with the other proposed answers to this. Sep 1, 2021 at 2:25
10

I've made a package for this, available on CRAN and GitHub, called "this.path". The current version is 0.7.0 published on 2022-04-24, you can find it here:

https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=this.path

https://github.com/ArcadeAntics/this.path

Install it with:

utils::install.packages("this.path")

or

utils::install.packages("https://raw.githubusercontent.com/ArcadeAntics/this.path/main/this.path_0.7.0.tar.gz")

and then use it by:

this.path::this.path()

or

library(this.path)

this.path()

The answer below is my original answer, kept just for reference, though it is quite a bit less functional than the most recent versions available above. Improvements include:

  • handling filenames with spaces when running an R script from a shell under Unix-alikes
  • handling both uses of running an R script from a shell (-f file and --file=file)
  • correctly normalizes the path when using base::source with argument chdir = TRUE
  • handling of file URLs with base::source (that is, "file://absolute or relative path" and "file:///absolute path")
  • better handling of a connection instead of a character string within base::source
  • this.path is compatible with URLs in source, that is:
source("https://host/path/to/file")

if this.path was used within the file, it would return "https://host/path/to/file". This also works for a URL beginning with "http://", "ftp://", and "ftps://". As an example, try:

source("https://raw.githubusercontent.com/ArcadeAntics/this.path/main/tests/this.path_w_URLs.R")
  • compatibility with package testthat, particularly testthat::source_file
  • introduces function here, similar to here::here, for specifying an absolute file path, relative to the executing script's directory
  • on Windows, in Rgui, added support for all languages listed by list.dirs(system.file(package = "translations"), full.names = FALSE, recursive = FALSE)
  • saving the normalized path within its appropriate environment the first time this.path is called within a script, making it faster to use subsequent times within the same script and being independent of working directory. This means that setwd will no longer break this.path when using relative paths within base::source or when running R from a shell (as long as setwd is used AFTER the first call to this.path within that script)

Original Answer:

My answer is an improvement upon Jerry T's answer. The issue I found is that they are guessing whether a source call was made by checking if variable ofile is found in the first frame on the stack. This will not work with nested source calls, nor source calls made from a non-global environment. Additionally, the order is wrong. We must look for source call BEFORE checking the shell arguments. Here is my solution:

this.path <- function (verbose = getOption("verbose"))
{
    where <- function(x) {
        if (verbose)
            cat("Source: ", x, "\n", sep = "")
    }


    # loop through functions that lead here from most recent to earliest looking
    #     for an appropriate source call (a call to function base::source or base::sys.source)
    # an appropriate source call is a source call in which
    #     argument 'file' has been evaluated (forced)
    # this means, for example, the following is an inappropriate source call:
    #     source(this.path())
    # the argument 'file' is stored as a promise
    #     containing the expression "this.path()"
    # when the value of 'file' is requested, it assigns the value
    #     returned by evaluating "this.path()" to variable 'file'
    # there are two functions on the calling stack at
    #     this point being 'source' and 'this.path'
    # clearly, you don't want to request the 'file' argument from that source
    #     call because the value of 'file' is under evaluation right now!
    # the trick is to ask if variable ('ofile' for base::source, 'exprs' for base::sys.source)
    #     exists in that function's evaluation environment. this is because that
    #     variable is created AFTER argument 'file' has been forced
    # if that variable does exist, then argument 'file' has been forced and the
    #     source call is deemed appropriate. For base::source, the filename we want
    #     is the variable 'ofile' from that function's evaluation environment. For
    #     base::sys.source, the filename we want is the variable 'file' from that
    #     function's evaluation environment.
    # if that variable does NOT exist, then argument 'file' hasn't been forced and
    #     the source call is deemed inappropriate. The 'for' loop moves to the next
    #     function up the calling stack (if available)
    #
    # unfortunately, there is no way to check the argument 'fileName' has been forced
    #     for 'debugSource' since all the work is done internally in C. Instead,
    #     we have to use a 'tryCatch' statement. When we ask for an object by name
    #     using 'get', R is capable of realizing if a variable is asking for its
    #     own definition (a recursive definition). The exact error is "promise already
    #     under evaluation" which indicates that the promise evaluation is requesting
    #     its own value. So we use the 'tryCatch' to get the argument 'fileName'
    #     from the evaluation environment of 'debugSource', and if it does not raise
    #     an error, then we are safe to return that value. If not, the condition
    #     returns false and the 'for' loop moves to the next function up the calling
    #     stack (if available)


    dbs <- if (.Platform$GUI == "RStudio")
        get("debugSource", "tools:rstudio", inherits = FALSE)
    for (n in seq.int(sys.nframe(), 1L)[-1L]) {
        if (identical(sys.function(n), base::source) &&
            exists("ofile", envir = sys.frame(n), inherits = FALSE)) {
            path <- get("ofile", envir = sys.frame(n), inherits = FALSE)
            if (!is.character(path))
                path <- summary.connection(path)$description
            where("call to function source")
            return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
        }
        else if (identical(sys.function(n), base::sys.source) &&
            exists("exprs", envir = sys.frame(n), inherits = FALSE)) {
            path <- get("file", envir = sys.frame(n), inherits = FALSE)
            where("call to function sys.source")
            return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
        }
        else if (identical(sys.function(n), dbs) &&
            tryCatch({
                path <- get("fileName", envir = sys.frame(n), inherits = FALSE)
                TRUE
            }, error = function(c) FALSE)) {
            where("call to function debugSource in RStudio")
            return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
        }
    }


    # if the for loop is passed, no appropriate
    #     source call was found up the calling stack
    # next, check if the user is running R from a shell
    #     on a Windows OS, the GUI is "RTerm"
    #     on a Unix    OS, the GUI is "X11"


    # if (running R from a shell)
    if (.Platform$OS.type == "windows" && .Platform$GUI == "RTerm" ||  # on Windows
        .Platform$OS.type == "unix"    && .Platform$GUI == "X11") {    # under Unix-alikes


        # get all shell arguments that start with "--file="
        # check the number of shell arguments starting with "--file="
        #     in case more or less than one were supplied


        path <- grep("^--file=", commandArgs(), value = TRUE)
        if (length(path) == 1L) {
            path <- sub("^--file=", "", path)
            where("shell argument 'FILE'")
            return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
        }
        else if (length(path)) {
            stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
                "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
                "* R is being run from a shell where formal argument 'FILE' matched by multiple actual arguments")
        }
        else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
            "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
            "* R is being run from a shell where argument 'FILE' is missing")
    }


    # if (running R from RStudio)
    else if (.Platform$GUI == "RStudio") {


        # function ".rs.api.getActiveDocumentContext" from the environment "tools:rstudio"
        #     returns a list of information about the document where your cursor is located
        #
        # function ".rs.api.getSourceEditorContext" from the environment "tools:rstudio"
        #     returns a list of information about the document open in the current tab
        #
        # element 'id' is a character string, an identification for the document
        # element 'path' is a character string, the path of the document


        adc <- get(".rs.api.getActiveDocumentContext",
            "tools:rstudio", inherits = FALSE)()
        if (adc$id != "#console") {
            path <- adc$path
            if (nzchar(path)) {
                where("active document in RStudio")
                return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
            }
            else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
                "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
                "* active document in RStudio does not exist")
        }


        sec <- get(".rs.api.getSourceEditorContext",
            "tools:rstudio", inherits = FALSE)()
        if (!is.null(sec)) {
            path <- sec$path
            if (nzchar(path)) {
                where("source document in RStudio")
                return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
            }
            else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
                "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
                "* source document in RStudio does not exist")
        }
        else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
            "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
            "* R is being run from RStudio with no documents open")
    }


    # if (running R from RGui on Windows)
    else if (.Platform$OS.type == "windows" && .Platform$GUI == "Rgui") {


        # on a Windows OS only, the function "getWindowsHandles" from the base
        # package "utils" returns a list of external pointers containing the windows
        # handles. The thing of interest are the names of this list, these should
        # be the names of the windows belonging to the current R process. Since
        # RGui can have files besides R scripts open (such as images), a regular
        # expression is used to subset only windows handles with names that exactly
        # match the string "R Console" or end with " - R Editor". I highly suggest
        # that you NEVER end a document's filename with " - R Editor". From there,
        # similar checks are done as in the above section for 'RStudio'


        wh <- names(utils::getWindowsHandles(pattern = "^R Console$| - R Editor$",
            minimized = TRUE))


        if (!length(wh))
            stop("no windows in RGui; should never happen, please report!")


        path <- wh[1L]
        if (path != "R Console") {
            path <- sub(" - R Editor$", "", path)
            if (path != "Untitled") {
                where("active document in RGui")
                return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
            }
            else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
                "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
                "* active document in RGui does not exist")
        }


        path <- wh[2L]
        if (!is.na(path)) {
            path <- sub(" - R Editor$", "", path)
            if (path != "Untitled") {
                where("source document in RGui")
                return(normalizePath(path, mustWork = TRUE))
            }
            else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
                "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
                "* source document in RGui does not exist")
        }
        else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
            "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
            "* R is being run from RGui with no documents open")
    }


    # if (running R from RGui on macOS)
    else if (.Platform$OS.type == "unix" && .Platform$GUI == "AQUA") {
        stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
            "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
            "* R is being run from AQUA which requires a source call on the calling stack")
    }


    # otherwise
    else stop("'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion\n",
        "* no appropriate source call was found up the calling stack\n",
        "* R is being run in an unrecognized manner")
}
5
  • 1
    When running this command on RGui, I get the following message. Any idea on how to get around it? Error in this.path::this.path() : 'this.path' used in an inappropriate fashion * no appropriate 'source' or 'sys.source' call was found up the calling stack * R is being run from RGui which requires a 'source' and 'sys.source' call on the calling stack
    – johnny
    Dec 2, 2020 at 4:28
  • 1
    I hadn't realized until you commented that you could run code from within a script from 'RGui', I thought previously that the only way to run code within a script from 'RGui' was to use 'source'. I'm looking into a fix for this issue, hopefully I'll find something soon. For now, you could use 'RStudio' to edit and run your scripts because I know it works from there. Sorry for the lack of an answer, but thank you for pointing out this bug!
    – Andrew
    Dec 2, 2020 at 5:34
  • 1
    @johnny I believe I found a solution, but it only works on a Windows OS. I'm attempting to find a solution for the macOS version of "RGui" named "AQUA", and then I'll upload the update to the package to CRAN. It'll be about ~10 business days before the update is approved for release by one of the CRAN maintainers, hopefully 'RStudio' is working for you in the meantime!
    – Andrew
    Dec 2, 2020 at 16:13
  • 1
    @johnny the update was released a few hours ago, much sooner than I was expecting. I've tested on two separate computers now, it seems to work as intended from 'RGui'!
    – Andrew
    Dec 3, 2020 at 14:22
  • 2
    Just tested v.0.2.0 on a script file saved in an RGui session, and it works for me. Thanks!
    – johnny
    Dec 3, 2020 at 15:02
9

I have wrapped up and extended the answers to this question into a new function thisfile() in rprojroot. Also works for knitting with knitr.

9

I tried almost everything from this question, Getting path of an R script, Get the path of current script, Find location of current .R file and R command for setting working directory to source file location in Rstudio, but at the end found myself manually browsing the CRAN table and found

scriptName library

which provides current_filename() function, which returns proper full path of the script when sourcing in RStudio and also when invoking via R or RScript executable.

2
  • 2
    Package ‘scriptName’ was removed from the CRAN repository. - what now? :o
    – Bojan P.
    May 27, 2019 at 9:53
  • 1
    I've uploaded a package named "this.path" to CRAN, it should solve this issue!
    – Andrew
    Nov 12, 2020 at 14:29
6

I liked steamer25's solution as it seems the most robust for my purposes. However, when debugging in RStudio (in windows), the path would not get set properly. The reason being that if a breakpoint is set in RStudio, sourcing the file uses an alternate "debug source" command which sets the script path a little differently. Here is the final version which I am currently using which accounts for this alternate behavior within RStudio when debugging:

# @return full path to this script
get_script_path <- function() {
    cmdArgs = commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
    needle = "--file="
    match = grep(needle, cmdArgs)
    if (length(match) > 0) {
        # Rscript
        return(normalizePath(sub(needle, "", cmdArgs[match])))
    } else {
        ls_vars = ls(sys.frames()[[1]])
        if ("fileName" %in% ls_vars) {
            # Source'd via RStudio
            return(normalizePath(sys.frames()[[1]]$fileName)) 
        } else {
            # Source'd via R console
            return(normalizePath(sys.frames()[[1]]$ofile))
        }
    }
}
1
  • 1
    source in Rstudio gave ofile for me, but debugSource gave fileName so your solution works well but the code comments aren't quite right in my case Jul 7, 2016 at 13:32
4

I also had this problem, and none of the above solutions worked for me. Maybe with the source or things like that, but it was not clear enough.

I found this, for me elegant, solution:

paste0(gsub("\\", "/", fileSnapshot()$path, fixed=TRUE),"/")

The important thing in that is the fileSnapshot() that gives you a lot of information about a file. It returns a list of 8 elements. When you pick path as the list element, the path is returned with \\ as separator, so the rest of the code is just to change that.

I hope this helps.

3
  • 2
    This did not work for me on a Linux machine; instead of returning the path of the file, it returned the directory I was currently located in. I created a test script called TEST.R with one line of code: print(fileSnapshot()$path) I saved it in this folder: /opt/home/boops/Desktop/Testfolder/TEST.R I then navigated to my desktop and tried to run the file: boops@linuxserver:~/Desktop$ Rscript /opt/home/boops/Desktop/Testfolder/TEST.R [1] "/opt/home/boops/Desktop" Jan 7, 2020 at 18:33
  • 1
    Didn't work for me either. Returns the same thing as 'here()' when using the 'here' library. It returned the path to my currently open R project, but not he very file itself being executed.
    – Joe Flack
    Jun 13, 2020 at 2:39
  • fileSnapshot()$path just returns the path of the current working directory, not the path of the executing script. Another thing, on Windows it is unnecessary to substitute the backslashes with forward slashes, but on a Unix-alike OS it is dangerous to do this since filenames can contain backslashes. Last thing, you should not have a path separator at the end of your path since R will no longer recognize the string as a path (as returned by 'file.exists').
    – Andrew
    Dec 15, 2020 at 19:23
3

I just worked this out myself. To ensure portability of your script always begin it with:

wd <- setwd(".")
setwd(wd)

It works because "." translates like the Unix command $PWD. Assigning this string to a character object allows you to then insert that character object into setwd() and Presto your code will always run with its current directory as the working directory, no matter whose machine it is on or where in the file structure it is located. (Extra bonus: The wd object can be used with file.path() (ie. file.path(wd, "output_directory") to allow for the creation of a standard output directory regardless of the file path leading to your named directory. This does require you to make the new directory before referencing it this way but that, too, can be aided with the wd object.

Alternately, the following code performs the exact same thing:

wd <- getwd()
setwd(wd)

or, if you don't need the file path in an object you can simply:

setwd(".")
2
  • 12
    Nope. That finds the directory of the process, not the file itself. Dec 9, 2016 at 20:45
  • This worked for me in Windows with RStudio in interactive mode.
    – Contango
    Aug 8, 2017 at 7:00
2

You can wrap the r script in a bash script and retrieve the script's path as a bash variable like so:

#!/bin/bash
     # [environment variables can be set here]
     path_to_script=$(dirname $0)

     R --slave<<EOF
        source("$path_to_script/other.R")

     EOF
2
  • 4
    This requires you to have the script path. It does not allow you to make a truly portable R script that can run from anywhere. Apr 3, 2012 at 18:19
  • @EtienneLow-Décarie It does not require the script path, it gets it from bash. The main issue is that it is not a reliable way to get the path. Something like this is preferred, as in stackoverflow.com/questions/59895/… path_to_script="$( cd "$( dirname "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}" )" && pwd )" Aug 28, 2017 at 21:00
2

I like this approach:

this.file <- sys.frame(tail(grep('source',sys.calls()),n=1))$ofile
this.dir <- dirname(this.file)
2

Note that the getopt package provides the get_Rscript_filename function, which just uses the same solution presented here, but is already written for you in a standard R module, so you don't have to copy and paste the "get script path" function into every script you write.

3
  • It always returns NA, even if I create a script that prints its output and then call the script e.g. with R -e "library(getopt); testscript.R"
    – bokov
    Feb 20, 2018 at 17:56
  • 1
    As the name of the function implies, you need to run your script using Rscript. Feb 21, 2018 at 0:42
  • Ah, oops. Thanks.
    – bokov
    Feb 23, 2018 at 1:49
2

If rather than the script, foo.R, knowing its path location, if you can change your code to always reference all source'd paths from a common root then these may be a great help:

Given

  • /app/deeply/nested/foo.R
  • /app/other.R

This will work

#!/usr/bin/env Rscript
library(here)
source(here("other.R"))

See https://rprojroot.r-lib.org/ for how to define project roots.

1
  • For me the here package do exactly the job and seems to be an easy solution
    – Ron
    Dec 10, 2019 at 14:25
1

See findSourceTraceback() of the R.utils package, which

Finds all 'srcfile' objects generated by source() in all call frames. This makes it possible to find out which files are currently scripted by source().

1

I had issues with the implementations above as my script is operated from a symlinked directory, or at least that's why I think the above solutions didn't work for me. Along the lines of @ennuikiller's answer, I wrapped my Rscript in bash. I set the path variable using pwd -P, which resolves symlinked directory structures. Then pass the path into the Rscript.

Bash.sh

#!/bin/bash

# set path variable
path=`pwd -P`

#Run Rscript with path argument
Rscript foo.R $path

foo.R

args <- commandArgs(trailingOnly=TRUE)
setwd(args[1])
source(other.R)
1

I would use a variant of @steamer25 's approach. The point is that I prefer to obtain the last sourced script even when my session was started through Rscript. The following snippet, when included on a file, will provided a variable thisScript containing the normalized path of the script. I confess the (ab)use of source'ing, so sometimes I invoke Rscript and the script provided in the --file argument sources another script that sources another one... Someday I will invest in making my messy code turns into a package.

thisScript <- (function() {
  lastScriptSourced <- tail(unlist(lapply(sys.frames(), function(env) env$ofile)), 1)

  if (is.null(lastScriptSourced)) {
    # No script sourced, checking invocation through Rscript
    cmdArgs <- commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
    needle <- "--file="
    match <- grep(needle, cmdArgs)
    if (length(match) > 0) {
      return(normalizePath(sub(needle, "", cmdArgs[match]), winslash=.Platform$file.sep, mustWork=TRUE))
    }
  } else {
    # 'source'd via R console
    return(normalizePath(lastScriptSourced, winslash=.Platform$file.sep, mustWork=TRUE))
  }
})()
1

99% of the cases you might simply use:

sys.calls()[[1]] [[2]]

It will not work for crazy calls where the script is not the first argument, i.e., source(some args, file="myscript"). Use @hadley's in these fancy cases.

1
  • 1
    Not from within RStudio, though, except when sourcing
    – nJGL
    Dec 24, 2017 at 8:08
1

Steamer25's approach works, but only if there is no whitespace in the path. On macOS at least the cmdArgs[match] returns something like /base/some~+~dir~+~with~+~whitespace/ for /base/some\ dir\ with\ whitespace/.

I worked around this by replacing the "~+~" with a simple whitespace before returning it.

thisFile <- function() {
  cmdArgs <- commandArgs(trailingOnly = FALSE)
  needle <- "--file="
  match <- grep(needle, cmdArgs)
  if (length(match) > 0) {
    # Rscript
    path <- cmdArgs[match]
    path <- gsub("\\~\\+\\~", " ", path)
    return(normalizePath(sub(needle, "", path)))
  } else {
    # 'source'd via R console
    return(normalizePath(sys.frames()[[1]]$ofile))
  }
}

Obviously you can still extend the else block like aprstar did.

1

By looking at the call stack we can get the filepath of each script being executed, the two most useful will probably either be the currently executing script, or the first script to be sourced (entry).

script.dir.executing = (function() return( if(length(sys.parents())==1) getwd() else dirname( Filter(is.character,lapply(rev(sys.frames()),function(x) x$ofile))[[1]] ) ))()

script.dir.entry = (function() return( if(length(sys.parents())==1) getwd() else dirname(sys.frame(1)$ofile) ))()
0
#!/usr/bin/env Rscript
print("Hello")

# sad workaround but works :(
programDir <- dirname(sys.frame(1)$ofile)
source(paste(programDir,"other.R",sep='/'))
source(paste(programDir,"other-than-other.R",sep='/'))
2
  • 1
    I still get the error "Error in sys.frame(1) : not that many frames on the stack " Oct 31, 2017 at 18:47
  • This only works when using source or sys.source, and it always grabs the first source on the stack, not the most recent.
    – Andrew
    Dec 11, 2020 at 16:32
0

Amazing there is no '$0' type structure in R! You can do it with a system() call to a bash script written in R:

write.table(c("readlink -e $0"), file="scriptpath.sh",col=F, row=F, quote=F)
thisscript <- system("sh scriptpath.sh", intern = TRUE)

Then just split out the scriptpath.sh name for other.R

splitstr <- rev(strsplit(thisscript, "\\/")[[1]])
otherscript <- paste0(paste(rev(splitstr[2:length(splitstr)]),collapse="/"),"/other.R")
1
  • I get an error message readLink: illegal option -- e usage: readLink [-FlLnqrsx] [-f format] [-t timefmt] [file ...]
    – altabq
    May 7, 2020 at 8:48
0

I work in an HPC cluster environment. I develop my code in a different location from where I do my production runs. During development, I'm usually calling R interactively from the command line (not using RStudio). There is lots of source("foo.R") going on.

During production runs, I usually write a bash script that tries different parameters and runs each set of parameters in a separate directory. The bash script utilizes the workload manager (i.e. SLURM). In this environment, it is trivial to set an environmental variable. With this in mind, the below solution works best for me.

other.R

my_message <- function(){
return("R is awkward")
}

foo.R

srcpath = Sys.getenv("R_SRC")
# Check if runnning w/o setting R_SRC - presumably done in directory of development, i.e. /path/to/R/code
if(srcpath == ""){
    srcpath="./"
}
source(sprintf("%s/other.R", srcpath))
string = my_message()
print(string)

If running this from the R interactive shell and within /path/to/R/code, simply do

> source("foo.R")

If running not from the interactive shell and not running from /path/to/R/code, set the environmental variable R_SRC first, then call Rscript

$ export R_SRC=/path/to/R/code/
$ Rscript /path/to/R/code/foo.R
0

The solution arrived in 2016. Many thanks to the author, Sahil Seth!

The package funr on CRAN and github provides the function sys.script() which gets the full path to the current script. It even references a similar SO post.

Thus, the solution is:

myscript.R:

#!/usr/bin/env Rscript
f  <-  funr::sys.script()
show(f)

and then executing the command:

user@somewhere:/home$ Rscript myscript.R

at the command line will output, e.g.:

"/home/path/to/myscript.R"

to the console.

0

Just to build on the above answers, as a safety check, you could add a wrapper that asks the user to find the file if (for whatever reason) sys.frame(1) fails (as it might if interactive() == TRUE), or the sourced script is not where the main script expects it to be.

fun_path = tryCatch(expr = 
                      {file.path(dirname(sys.frame(1)$ofile), "foo.R")},
                    error = function(e){'foo.R'}
                    )
if(!file.exists(fun_path))
{
  msg = 'Please select "foo.R"'
  # ask user to find data
  if(Sys.info()[['sysname']] == 'Windows'){#choose.files is only available on Windows
    message('\n\n',msg,'\n\n')
    Sys.sleep(0.5)#goes too fast for the user to see the message on some computers
    fun_path  = choose.files(
      default = file.path(gsub('\\\\', '/', Sys.getenv('USERPROFILE')),#user
                          'Documents'),
      caption = msg
    )
  }else{
    message('\n\n',msg,'\n\n')
    Sys.sleep(0.5)#goes too fast for the user to see the message on some computers
    fun_path = file.choose(new=F)
  }
}
#source the function
source(file = fun_path, 
       encoding = 'UTF-8')

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