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This is more of 'inner workings' undestanding question:

How do noSQL databases that do not support *A*CID (meaning that they cannot update/insert and then rollback data for more than one object in a single transaction) -- update the secondary indexes ?

My understanding is -- that in order to keep the secondary index in sync (other wise it will become stale for reads) -- this has to happen withing the same transaction.

furthermore, if it is possible for index to reside on a different host than the data -- then a distributed lock needs to be present and/or two-phase commit for such an update to work atomically.

But if these databases do not support the multi-object transactions (which means they do not do two-phase commit on data across multiple host) , what method do they use to guarantee that secondary indices that reside in B-trees structures separate from the data are not stale ?

3 Answers 3

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This is a great question.

RethinkDB always stores secondary indexes on the same host as the primary index/data for the table. Even in case of joins, RethinkDB brings the query to the data, so the secondary indexes, primary indexes, and data always reside on the same node. As a result, there is no need for distributed locking protocols such as two phase commit.

RethinkDB does support a limited set of transactional functionality -- single document transactions. Changes to a single document are recorded atomically. Relevant secondary index changes are also recorded as part of that transaction, so either the entire change is recorded, or nothing is recorded at all.

It would be easy to extend the limited transactional functionality to support multiple documents in a single shard, but it would be hard to do it across shards (for the distributed locking reasons you brought up), so we decided not to implement transactions for multiple documents yet.

Hope this helps.

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    To clarify a bit on this. Every shard of a table contains all of the indexing data for the shard. This means that there's as many copies of each index as there are replicas. It's incorrect to say that "the entire change is recorded, or nothing is recorded at all." Each replica will either record or not record the change (and resulting index changes.) A replica, and thus its index can be out of date (and the stale data can be accessed by passing a use_outdated = True flag. This data will never be used without that flag being set and will eventually be brought up to date. Aug 12, 2013 at 20:42
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This is a MongoDB answer.

I am not quite sure what your logic here is. Updating a secondary index has nothing to do with being able to rollback multi statement transactions such as a multiple update.

MongoDB has transcactions per a single document, and that is what matters for updating indexes. These operations can be reversed using the journal if the need arises.

this has to happen withing the same transaction.

Yes, much like a RDBMS would. The more indexes you apply the slower your writes will be, and it seems to me you know why.

As the write occurs MongoDB will update all indexes which apply to that collection with the fields that apply to specific indexes.

furthermore, if it is possible for index to reside on a different host than the data

I am unsure if MongoDB allows that, I believe there is a JIRA for it; however, I cannot find that JIRA currently.

then a distributed lock needs to be present and/or two-phase commit for such an update to work atomically.

Most likely. Allowing this feature would be...well, let's just say creating a hairball.

Even in a sharded setup the index of each range resides on the shard itself, not on the config servers.

But if these databases do not support the multi-object transactions (which means they do not do two-phase commit on data across multiple host)

That is not what a two phase commit means. I believe you need to brush up on what a two phase commit is: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/perform-two-phase-commits/

I suppose if you are talking about a transaction covering more than one shard then, hmm ok.

what method do they use to guarantee that secondary indices that reside in B-trees structures separate from the data are not stale ?

Agan I am unsure why a multi document transaction would effect whether an index would be stale or not, your not grouping across documents. The exception to that is a unique index but that works on single document updates as well; note that its uniqueness gets kinda hairy in sharded setups and cannot be guaranteed.

In an index you are creating, normally, one entry per document prefix key, uless it is a multikey index on the docment then you can make more than one index, however, either way index updating is done per single object, not by multi document transactions and I am unsure what you logic here is aas such this is the answer I have placed.

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  • Two phase commit is a protocol used to maintain transaction integrity across multiple hosts. So yes, I am talking 'transactions on multiple documents' across multiple hosts. So the question was: if Mongo and Rethink do not do two-phase commit transaction today, how can they maintain secondary indexes on a shard different than the data. I think your answer was -- that they do not maintain secondary index on a different shard than the data. Therefore they do not need to phase commit
    – V P
    Aug 11, 2013 at 0:04
  • @VP OK so you mean in a sharded set, then: yes, they will not mantain that index on the other shard, as well two phase commit has no requirement to be between two hosts, it is a case of two distinct transactions being completely atomic as one operation
    – Sammaye
    Aug 11, 2013 at 0:15
  • Ok, understood for Mongo. Would like to get some feedback on rethinkDB. Rethink has joins, that means index may be in memory of a host different than data host. Also 2phase commit has requirement of separate hosts: " A distributed transaction is an operations bundle, in which two or more network hosts are involved " en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-phase_commit_protocol
    – V P
    Aug 11, 2013 at 1:00
  • @VP I do not find that text on that page
    – Sammaye
    Aug 11, 2013 at 1:31
  • @Sammaya: the 2phase commit link above has text "It is a distributed algorithm that coordinates all the processes that participate in a distributed atomic transaction ". Then the definition of a distributed atomic transaction is then given by this link en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_transaction . And this link has the text I referred to when stating that 2phase commit necessarily involves more than one host
    – V P
    Aug 11, 2013 at 4:23
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RethinkDB always stores secondary index data on the same machine as the data it's indexing. This allows it to be updated within the same transaction. Rethink promises to be ACIDy with single document operations and considers the indexing of a document to be part of the document itself.

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