Answer: My pseudo is fuzzy in the recursive aspect but this video is helpful along with the resources below

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-gpaIGRCQI

http://norvig.com/sudoku.html

Can't grasp the implementation of this backtrack recursive algorithm in respect to a sudoku puzzle.

I'm trying to solve a sudoku puzzle using recursive backtracking. I've been still unable to wrap the general algorithm around in my head given the problem domain I'm working in.

The backtracking algorithm I'm trying to use seems standard but I can't follow the logic and know whats happening underneath.

Included is the backtracking algorithm and its definition.

Edit: "Again, took out the class definition, left the declaration and put up the pseudo code"

Here's my pseudocode utilizing this.

Pseudo Code (C++ implement) backtrack game (81,9) // represents all possible combinations of input and values for game

    //All info is loading into a vector of size 81 with the initial state 
    //puzzle = the initial state 9x9 grid from left to right of integers  
        vector <int> puzzle
while(!not solved && not the end of the vector){
     for(int i =puzzle.begin::iterator i , puzzle.end()) //from 0-80 of the vector until end
        if puzzle[i] != 0
             //leave alone, original state of board
        else
              if (valid move) //a guess is allowed in this column/row/square of the board  
                   solution[i] = puzzle_guess[i]  //guess a move and insert 
              else  // one of previous guesses were wrong
                   game.prune(i); //backtracks, or reverses guesses until valid move
}

//initial state of the game

    4 0 0  6 0 5  2 0 3
    0 0 0  0 4 9  0 7 5
    0 0 0  1 0 7  6 0 0

    6 0 1  0 0 0  4 8 7
    0 8 0  0 0 0  0 3 0
    2 7 4  0 0 0  5 0 6

    0 0 8  7 0 3  0 0 0
    3 1 0  9 6 0  0 0 0
    7 0 9  2 0 8  0 0 1

Thank you

The only clue to know is the declaration using backtrack game (81,9) // signifying the 81 possibly numbers and 9 for the 9 different options.

#ifndef BACKTRACK_H
#define BACKTRACK_H

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

class BackTrack {
public:
  typedef std::vector<unsigned>::const_iterator const_iterator;
  typedef std::vector<unsigned>::const_iterator iterator;

  BackTrack (unsigned nVariables, unsigned arity=2);
  // Create a backtracking state for a problem with
  // nVariables variables, each of which has the same
  // number of possible values (arity).

  template <class Iterator>
  BackTrack (Iterator arityBegin,
         Iterator arityEnd);
  // Create a backtracking state in which each variable may have
  // a different number of possible values. The values are obtained
  // as integers stored in positions arityBegin .. arityEnd as per
  // the usual conventions for C++ iterators. The number of
  // variables in the system are inferred from the number of
  // positions in the given range.

  unsigned operator[] (unsigned variableNumber) const;
  // Returns the current value associated with the indicated
  // variable.

  unsigned numberOfVariables() const;
  // Returns the number of variables in the backtracking system.

  unsigned arity (unsigned variableNumber) const;
  // Returns the number of potential values that can be assigned
  // to the indicated variable.

  bool more() const;
  // Indicates whether additional candidate solutions exist that
  // can be reached by subsequent ++ or prune operaations.

  void prune (unsigned level);
  // Indicates that the combination of values associated with
  // variables 0 .. level-1 (inclusive) has been judged unacceptable
  // (regardless of the values that could be given to variables
  // level..numberOfVariables()-1.  The backtracking state will advance
  // to the next solution in which at least one of the values in the
  // variables 0..level-1 will have changed.

  BackTrack& operator++();
  // Indicates that the combination of values associated with
  // variables 0 .. nVariables-1 (inclusive) has been judged unacceptable.
  // The backtracking state will advance
  // to the next solution in which at least one of the values in the
  // variables 0..level-1 will have changed.

  BackTrack operator++(int);
  // Same as other operator++, but returns a copy of the old backtrack state


  // Iterator operations for easy access to the currently assigned values
  const_iterator begin() const {return values.begin();}
  iterator begin()             {return values.begin();}

  const_iterator end() const {return values.end();}
  iterator       end()       {return values.end();}

private:
  bool done;
  std::vector<unsigned> arities;
  std::vector<unsigned> values;

};
inline
unsigned BackTrack::operator[] (unsigned variableNumber) const
  // Returns the current value associated with the indicated
  // variable.
{
  return values[variableNumber];
}

inline
unsigned BackTrack::numberOfVariables() const
  // Returns the number of variables in the backtracking system.
{
  return values.size();
}

inline
unsigned BackTrack::arity (unsigned variableNumber) const
  // Returns the number of potential values that can be assigned
  // to the indicated variable.
{
  return arities[variableNumber];
}


inline
bool BackTrack::more() const
  // Indicates whether additional candidate solutions exist that
  // can be reached by subsequent ++ or prune operaations.
{
  return !done;
}

template <class Iterator>
BackTrack::BackTrack (Iterator arityBegin,
              Iterator arityEnd):
  // Create a backtracking state in which each variable may have
  // a different number of possible values. The values are obtained
  // as integers stored in positions arityBegin .. arityEnd as per
  // the usual conventions for C++ iterators. The number of
  // variables in the system are inferred from the number of
  // positions in the given range.
  arities(arityBegin, arityEnd), done(false) 
{
  fill_n (back_inserter(values), arities.size(), 0);
}


#endif
  • 2
    @MitchWheat You think he wrote this code? Obviously he just copy-and-pasted from a tutorial. – user2638922 Aug 11 '13 at 3:39
  • @MitchWheat I don't claim to have written the algorithm. It would be quite a feat to write a working one without any knowledge of it :). Heres a light slight deck, with a semi relevant slide that's a bit more spelled out see.stanford.edu/materials/icspacs106b/Lecture11.pdf I admit my pseudo code could be riddled with errors in respect to this general algorthim – Bjarn127 Aug 11 '13 at 3:52
  • 1
    Remove the C++ code from the question. It is irrelevant and won't help you. Your problem is with the algorithm, not with a specific implementation. Concentrate on the former. – n.m. Aug 11 '13 at 5:08
  • 1
    @Bjarn127 Don't forget the Stanford honor code. – Marichyasana Aug 11 '13 at 5:14
  • 1
    I think I haven't expressed myself clear enough. Let me try again. There are problems in the pseudocode which suggest that you don't really understand the algorithm. It's meaningless to discuss a body of quite complex C++ code based on a simple but misunderstood algorithm. Now you have removed the pseudocode, which could have served a useful basis for discussion because it's small and easily grasped, and left the code in place. You should have done exactly the opposite. – n.m. Aug 11 '13 at 5:44

Here is a simple pseudocode which may help you understand the recursion and backtracking:

solve(game):
    if (game board is full)
        return SUCCESS
    else
        next_square = getNextEmptySquare()
        for each value that can legally be put in next_square
            put value in next_square (i.e. modify game state)
            if (solve(game)) return SUCCESS
            remove value from next_square (i.e. backtrack to a previous state)
    return FAILURE

Once you can understand that, the next thing is to understand how various implementations of getNextEmptySquare() will affect performance by pruning the state space graph in different ways.

I don't see any recursion or methodical searching in your original pseudocode, although it is not entirely clear, it appears to just try random permutations over and over?

  • hi @The111, the algorithm uses the second parameter arity to keep track of possible values. I think it uses a logical left to right solving methodology solving from 0-9, and placing valid values in each respective grid slot. If grid spot 6 is found to be invalid, it would roll back or 'backtrack' In the sense of the algorithm, I am guessing it blocks that 'unacceptable value' from the arity and goes back to a previous state where a valid arity of used. The state is kept by this 'backtrack class' Thanks for the response! – Bjarn127 Aug 11 '13 at 14:44
  • 1
    Great explanation, thanks! – danielbeard Aug 2 '15 at 2:26

The point about Sudoku is, that you have a massive number of states: 9^81 is a number of 78 digits. Therefore, any "dumb" backtracking algorithm starting from the top left field and processing towards bottom right is likely to get stuck in an seemingly "endless" loop.

Therefore, my recommendation is to solve Sudoku like a human does: Find a field, for which the already filled in numbers allow only one specific value, and fill in that field. Then look for the next such field. If no more empty fields exist, for which only one value is legal, look for fields, that allow at most two (or generally, the minimum number of possible) values, and try one of those values, and continue with the recursion. Backtrack, if any contradictions arise, and then try the next value for a field, that had several alternatives.

In pseudo code:

solve(game)
    if (game->is_solved())
        game->print()
        return SUCCESS
    else
        next_square = game->find_most_constrained_square()
        foreach value = next_square->possible_values
            mygame = copyof(game)
            mygame->move(next_square, value)
            if solve(mygame) return SUCCESS
        endforeach
        return FAILURE
    endif

The function find_most_constrained_square() counts for each empty field, how many different numbers can still be put there, and returns the index to that field, that had the lowest number of possibilities. This could even be a field with 0 alternatives.

With that modified recursion, Sudoko problems should be quickly solved even with slow languages on slow computers. Don't forget to throw away the various copies of the game state made in the foreach inner loop!

  • You can reuse the same game copy at every recursive call as long as you "undo" the move afterwards. This saves the time and space of making so many copies. – The111 Aug 11 '13 at 18:44
  • "Undo" a move in Sudoku isn't an easy operation, in particular, if one saves additional state for each field. For example, one could use a bitfield of the values, that are still possible for each field. In that case, seting a value to a certain cell means removing that value as legal from the legal-values bitfield in the other cells in the same row, column or group. But re-setting those bits after a move is backtracked could be wrong, as the particular value could have already been disallowed for some other, previously set field. Therefore, I recommended "copy" over "undo". – Kai Petzke Aug 11 '13 at 18:57

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