4

I want to convolve an n-dimensional image which is conceptually periodic.

What I mean is the following: if I have a 2D image

>>> image2d = [[0,0,0,0],
...            [0,0,0,1],
...            [0,0,0,0]]

and I want to convolve it with this kernel:

>>> kernel = [[ 1,1,1],
...           [ 1,1,1],
...           [ 1,1,1]]

then I want the result to be:

>>> result = [[1,0,1,1],
...           [1,0,1,1],
...           [1,0,1,1]]

How to do this in python/numpy/scipy?

Note that I am not interested in creating the kernel, but mainly the periodicity of the convolution, i.e. the three leftmost ones in the resulting image (if that makes sense).

1
  • I think you'll have to roll your own code, pretty easy using FFTs and the convolution theorem. The only tricky part could be how to pad the kernel to get the right answer.
    – Jaime
    Aug 11 '13 at 14:48
4

This is already built in, with scipy.signal.convolve2d's optional boundary='wrap' which gives periodic boundary conditions as padding for the convolution. The mode option here is 'same' to make the output size match the input size.

In [1]: image2d = [[0,0,0,0],
    ...            [0,0,0,1],
    ...            [0,0,0,0]]

In [2]: kernel = [[ 1,1,1],
    ...           [ 1,1,1],
    ...           [ 1,1,1]]

In [3]: from scipy.signal import convolve2d

In [4]: convolve2d(image2d, kernel, mode='same', boundary='wrap')
Out[4]: 
array([[1, 0, 1, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 1]])

The only disadvantage here is that you cannot use scipy.signal.fftconvolve which is often faster.

3
image2d = [[0,0,0,0,0],
           [0,0,0,1,0],
           [0,0,0,0,0],
           [0,0,0,0,0]]
kernel = [[1,1,1],
          [1,1,1],
          [1,1,1]]
image2d = np.asarray(image2d)
kernel = np.asarray(kernel)

img_f = np.fft.fft2(image2d)
krn_f = np.fft.fft2(kernel, s=image2d.shape)

conv = np.fft.ifft2(img_f*krn_f).real

>>> conv.round()
array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.]])

Note that the kernel is placed with its top left corner at the position of the 1 in the image. You would need to roll the result to get what you are after:

k_rows, k_cols = kernel.shape
conv2 = np.roll(np.roll(conv, -(k_cols//2), axis=-1),
                -(k_rows//2), axis=-2)
>>> conv2.round()
array([[ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])
1

This kind of 'periodic convolution' is better known as circular or cyclic convolution. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_convolution.

In the case of an n-dimensional image, as is the case in this question, one can use the scipy.ndimage.convolve function. It has a parameter mode which can be set to wrap for a circular convolution.

result = scipy.ndimage.convolve(image,kernel,mode='wrap')

>>> import numpy as np
>>> image = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 0],
...                   [0, 0, 0, 1],
...                   [0, 0, 0, 0]])
>>> kernel = np.array([[1, 1, 1],
...                    [1, 1, 1],
...                    [1, 1, 1]])
>>> from scipy.ndimage import convolve
>>> convolve(image, kernel, mode='wrap')
array([[1, 0, 1, 1],   
       [1, 0, 1, 1],
       [1, 0, 1, 1]])
3
  • scipy.signal.fftconvolve does not support the 'wrap' mode.
    – askewchan
    Aug 25 '13 at 4:09
  • No, but it performs a circular convolution. Aug 26 '13 at 9:52
  • It doesn't do circular conditions on my system, not with any of the modes listed in the documentation. Just be sure to test any of these with a sample before use on data.
    – askewchan
    Aug 26 '13 at 15:06

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