1018

I have the following DataFrame:

             daysago  line_race rating        rw    wrating
 line_date                                                 
2007-03-31       62         11     56  1.000000  56.000000
2007-03-10       83         11     67  1.000000  67.000000
2007-02-10      111          9     66  1.000000  66.000000
2007-01-13      139         10     83  0.880678  73.096278
2006-12-23      160         10     88  0.793033  69.786942
2006-11-09      204          9     52  0.636655  33.106077
2006-10-22      222          8     66  0.581946  38.408408
2006-09-29      245          9     70  0.518825  36.317752
2006-09-16      258         11     68  0.486226  33.063381
2006-08-30      275          8     72  0.446667  32.160051
2006-02-11      475          5     65  0.164591  10.698423
2006-01-13      504          0     70  0.142409   9.968634
2006-01-02      515          0     64  0.134800   8.627219
2005-12-06      542          0     70  0.117803   8.246238
2005-11-29      549          0     70  0.113758   7.963072
2005-11-22      556          0     -1  0.109852  -0.109852
2005-11-01      577          0     -1  0.098919  -0.098919
2005-10-20      589          0     -1  0.093168  -0.093168
2005-09-27      612          0     -1  0.083063  -0.083063
2005-09-07      632          0     -1  0.075171  -0.075171
2005-06-12      719          0     69  0.048690   3.359623
2005-05-29      733          0     -1  0.045404  -0.045404
2005-05-02      760          0     -1  0.039679  -0.039679
2005-04-02      790          0     -1  0.034160  -0.034160
2005-03-13      810          0     -1  0.030915  -0.030915
2004-11-09      934          0     -1  0.016647  -0.016647

I need to remove the rows where line_race is equal to 0. What's the most efficient way to do this?

1

19 Answers 19

1562

If I'm understanding correctly, it should be as simple as:

df = df[df.line_race != 0]
19
  • 23
    Will this cost more memory if df is large? Or, can I do it inplace?
    – Ziyuan
    May 8, 2015 at 13:21
  • 27
    Just ran it on a df with 2M rows and it went pretty fast.
    – Dror
    Aug 11, 2015 at 14:37
  • 83
    @vfxGer if there is a space in the column, like 'line race', then you can just do df = df[df['line race'] != 0]
    – Paul
    Apr 27, 2016 at 16:36
  • 4
    How would we modify this command if we wanted to delete the whole row if the value in question is found in any of columns in that row?
    – Alex
    Apr 27, 2016 at 20:27
  • 8
    Thanks! Fwiw, for me this had to be df=df[~df['DATE'].isin(['2015-10-30.1', '2015-11-30.1', '2015-12-31.1'])]
    – citynorman
    Dec 5, 2016 at 14:47
310

But for any future bypassers you could mention that df = df[df.line_race != 0] doesn't do anything when trying to filter for None/missing values.

Does work:

df = df[df.line_race != 0]

Doesn't do anything:

df = df[df.line_race != None]

Does work:

df = df[df.line_race.notnull()]
6
  • 5
    how to do that if we don't know the column name? Jul 3, 2018 at 13:20
  • 2
    Could do df = df[df.columns[2].notnull()], but one way or another you need to be able to index the column somehow.
    – erekalper
    Nov 9, 2018 at 20:35
  • 5
    df = df[df.line_race != 0] drops the rows but also does not reset the index. So when you add another row in the df it may not add at the end. I'd recommend resetting the index after that operation (df = df.reset_index(drop=True)) Jul 17, 2019 at 14:53
  • 2
    You should never compare to None with the == operator to start. stackoverflow.com/questions/3257919/… Apr 13, 2020 at 8:25
  • 2
    For None values you can use is instead of == and is not instead of !=, like in this example df = df[df.line_race is not None] will work
    – Pradyut
    Jun 18, 2021 at 5:11
158

just to add another solution, particularly useful if you are using the new pandas assessors, other solutions will replace the original pandas and lose the assessors

df.drop(df.loc[df['line_race']==0].index, inplace=True)
5
  • 7
    what is the purpose of writing index and inplace. Can anyone explain please ?
    – heman123
    Nov 9, 2018 at 6:05
  • 4
    Read the docs!
    – Facorazza
    Apr 15, 2019 at 9:52
  • 3
    I think we'd need to .reset_index() as well if someone ends up using index accessors
    – Ayush
    Jun 8, 2020 at 21:14
  • 2
    This indeed is correct answer using in data search and drop. Adding more explanation here. df['line_race']==0].index -> This will find the row index of all 'line_race' column having value 0. inplace=True -> this will modify original dataframe df. If you do not want to modify original dataframe, remove if(default is False) and store return value in another dataframe.
    – AndroDev
    Nov 22, 2021 at 14:50
  • 1
    This is the cleanest solution as it's the only one that uses positive conditions.
    – t3chb0t
    Aug 26, 2022 at 4:42
77

In case of multiple values and str dtype

I used the following to filter out given values in a col:

def filter_rows_by_values(df, col, values):
    return df[~df[col].isin(values)]

Example:

In a DataFrame I want to remove rows which have values "b" and "c" in column "str"

df = pd.DataFrame({"str": ["a","a","a","a","b","b","c"], "other": [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]})
df
   str  other
0   a   1
1   a   2
2   a   3
3   a   4
4   b   5
5   b   6
6   c   7

filter_rows_by_values(df, "str", ["b","c"])

   str  other
0   a   1
1   a   2
2   a   3
3   a   4
1
  • 3
    I also liked this. Might be totally obsolete, but added a small parameter that helps me decide whether select or delete it. Handy if you want to split a df in two: def filter_rows_by_values(df, col, values, true_or_false = False): return df[df[col].isin(values) == true_or_false]
    – Charles
    Apr 9, 2021 at 9:44
71

If you want to delete rows based on multiple values of the column, you could use:

df[(df.line_race != 0) & (df.line_race != 10)]

To drop all rows with values 0 and 10 for line_race.

3
  • 4
    Is there a more efficient way to do this if you had multiple values you wanted to drop i.e., drop = [0, 10] and then something like df[(df.line_race != drop)]
    – mikey
    Jun 10, 2020 at 19:32
  • 2
    good suggestion. df[(df.line_race != drop)] does not work, but I guess there is a possibility to do it more efficient. I do not have a solution right now, but if someone has, please let us now.
    – Robvh
    Jun 15, 2020 at 11:39
  • 11
    df[~(df["line_race"].isin([0,10]))] stackoverflow.com/questions/38944673/… Jul 7, 2020 at 22:57
66

Though the previous answer are almost similar to what I am going to do, but using the index method does not require using another indexing method .loc(). It can be done in a similar but precise manner as

df.drop(df.index[df['line_race'] == 0], inplace = True)
2
  • 6
    In place solution better for large datasets or memory constrained. +1
    – davmor
    Oct 24, 2019 at 11:45
  • 2
    This method requires the index to be unique. If it isn't, you need to use df.reset_index() first or when concatenating dataframes use the flag ignore_index=True
    – Kyle
    May 8, 2023 at 22:14
49

The best way to do this is with boolean masking:

In [56]: df
Out[56]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating    raw  wrating
0   2007-03-31       62         11      56  1.000   56.000
1   2007-03-10       83         11      67  1.000   67.000
2   2007-02-10      111          9      66  1.000   66.000
3   2007-01-13      139         10      83  0.881   73.096
4   2006-12-23      160         10      88  0.793   69.787
5   2006-11-09      204          9      52  0.637   33.106
6   2006-10-22      222          8      66  0.582   38.408
7   2006-09-29      245          9      70  0.519   36.318
8   2006-09-16      258         11      68  0.486   33.063
9   2006-08-30      275          8      72  0.447   32.160
10  2006-02-11      475          5      65  0.165   10.698
11  2006-01-13      504          0      70  0.142    9.969
12  2006-01-02      515          0      64  0.135    8.627
13  2005-12-06      542          0      70  0.118    8.246
14  2005-11-29      549          0      70  0.114    7.963
15  2005-11-22      556          0      -1  0.110   -0.110
16  2005-11-01      577          0      -1  0.099   -0.099
17  2005-10-20      589          0      -1  0.093   -0.093
18  2005-09-27      612          0      -1  0.083   -0.083
19  2005-09-07      632          0      -1  0.075   -0.075
20  2005-06-12      719          0      69  0.049    3.360
21  2005-05-29      733          0      -1  0.045   -0.045
22  2005-05-02      760          0      -1  0.040   -0.040
23  2005-04-02      790          0      -1  0.034   -0.034
24  2005-03-13      810          0      -1  0.031   -0.031
25  2004-11-09      934          0      -1  0.017   -0.017

In [57]: df[df.line_race != 0]
Out[57]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating    raw  wrating
0   2007-03-31       62         11      56  1.000   56.000
1   2007-03-10       83         11      67  1.000   67.000
2   2007-02-10      111          9      66  1.000   66.000
3   2007-01-13      139         10      83  0.881   73.096
4   2006-12-23      160         10      88  0.793   69.787
5   2006-11-09      204          9      52  0.637   33.106
6   2006-10-22      222          8      66  0.582   38.408
7   2006-09-29      245          9      70  0.519   36.318
8   2006-09-16      258         11      68  0.486   33.063
9   2006-08-30      275          8      72  0.447   32.160
10  2006-02-11      475          5      65  0.165   10.698

UPDATE: Now that pandas 0.13 is out, another way to do this is df.query('line_race != 0').

8
  • 17
    Good update for query. It allows for more rich selection criteria (eg. set-like operations like df.query('variable in var_list') where 'var_list' is a list of desired values)
    – philE
    Sep 30, 2014 at 20:32
  • 1
    how would this be achieved if the column name has a space in the name?
    – iNoob
    Oct 5, 2015 at 13:56
  • 2
    query is not very useful if the column name has a space in it. Oct 7, 2015 at 19:12
  • 4
    I would avoid having spaces in the headers with something like this df = df.rename(columns=lambda x: x.strip().replace(' ','_')) Nov 28, 2016 at 18:27
  • 1
    @Scientist1642 Same, but more concise: df.columns = df.columns.str.replace(' ', '_').
    – RolfBly
    Aug 13, 2018 at 13:01
19

The given answer is correct nontheless as someone above said you can use df.query('line_race != 0') which depending on your problem is much faster. Highly recommend.

2
  • Especially helpful if you have long DataFrame variable names like me (and, I'd venture to guess, everyone as compared to the df used for examples), because you only have to write it once.
    – ijoseph
    Apr 26, 2018 at 17:52
  • Why would that be faster? You're taking a string and evaluating it as opposed to a normal expression. Jul 7, 2021 at 3:24
9

There are various ways to achieve that. Will leave below various options, that one can use, depending on specificities of one's use case.

One will consider that OP's dataframe is stored in the variable df.


Option 1

For OP's case, considering that the only column with values 0 is the line_race, the following will do the work

 df_new = df[df != 0].dropna()
 
[Out]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31       62       11.0      56  1.000000  56.000000
1   2007-03-10       83       11.0      67  1.000000  67.000000
2   2007-02-10      111        9.0      66  1.000000  66.000000
3   2007-01-13      139       10.0      83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23      160       10.0      88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09      204        9.0      52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22      222        8.0      66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29      245        9.0      70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16      258       11.0      68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30      275        8.0      72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11      475        5.0      65  0.164591  10.698423

However, as that is not always the case, would recommend checking the following options where one will specify the column name.


Option 2

tshauck's approach ends up being better than Option 1, because one is able to specify the column. There are, however, additional variations depending on how one wants to refer to the column:

For example, using the position in the dataframe

df_new = df[df[df.columns[2]] != 0]

Or by explicitly indicating the column as follows

df_new = df[df['line_race'] != 0]

One can also follow the same login but using a custom lambda function, such as

df_new = df[df.apply(lambda x: x['line_race'] != 0, axis=1)]

[Out]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31       62       11.0      56  1.000000  56.000000
1   2007-03-10       83       11.0      67  1.000000  67.000000
2   2007-02-10      111        9.0      66  1.000000  66.000000
3   2007-01-13      139       10.0      83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23      160       10.0      88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09      204        9.0      52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22      222        8.0      66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29      245        9.0      70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16      258       11.0      68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30      275        8.0      72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11      475        5.0      65  0.164591  10.698423

Option 3

Using pandas.Series.map and a custom lambda function

df_new = df['line_race'].map(lambda x: x != 0)

[Out]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31       62       11.0      56  1.000000  56.000000
1   2007-03-10       83       11.0      67  1.000000  67.000000
2   2007-02-10      111        9.0      66  1.000000  66.000000
3   2007-01-13      139       10.0      83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23      160       10.0      88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09      204        9.0      52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22      222        8.0      66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29      245        9.0      70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16      258       11.0      68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30      275        8.0      72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11      475        5.0      65  0.164591  10.698423

Option 4

Using pandas.DataFrame.drop as follows

df_new = df.drop(df[df['line_race'] == 0].index)

[Out]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31       62       11.0      56  1.000000  56.000000
1   2007-03-10       83       11.0      67  1.000000  67.000000
2   2007-02-10      111        9.0      66  1.000000  66.000000
3   2007-01-13      139       10.0      83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23      160       10.0      88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09      204        9.0      52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22      222        8.0      66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29      245        9.0      70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16      258       11.0      68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30      275        8.0      72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11      475        5.0      65  0.164591  10.698423

Option 5

Using pandas.DataFrame.query as follows

df_new = df.query('line_race != 0')

[Out]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31       62       11.0      56  1.000000  56.000000
1   2007-03-10       83       11.0      67  1.000000  67.000000
2   2007-02-10      111        9.0      66  1.000000  66.000000
3   2007-01-13      139       10.0      83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23      160       10.0      88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09      204        9.0      52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22      222        8.0      66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29      245        9.0      70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16      258       11.0      68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30      275        8.0      72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11      475        5.0      65  0.164591  10.698423

Option 6

Using pandas.DataFrame.drop and pandas.DataFrame.query as follows

df_new = df.drop(df.query('line_race == 0').index)

[Out]:
     line_date  daysago  line_race  rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31       62       11.0      56  1.000000  56.000000
1   2007-03-10       83       11.0      67  1.000000  67.000000
2   2007-02-10      111        9.0      66  1.000000  66.000000
3   2007-01-13      139       10.0      83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23      160       10.0      88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09      204        9.0      52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22      222        8.0      66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29      245        9.0      70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16      258       11.0      68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30      275        8.0      72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11      475        5.0      65  0.164591  10.698423

Option 7

If one doesn't have strong opinions on the output, one can use a vectorized approach with numpy.select

df_new = np.select([df != 0], [df], default=np.nan)

[Out]:
[['2007-03-31' 62 11.0 56 1.0 56.0]
 ['2007-03-10' 83 11.0 67 1.0 67.0]
 ['2007-02-10' 111 9.0 66 1.0 66.0]
 ['2007-01-13' 139 10.0 83 0.880678 73.096278]
 ['2006-12-23' 160 10.0 88 0.793033 69.786942]
 ['2006-11-09' 204 9.0 52 0.636655 33.106077]
 ['2006-10-22' 222 8.0 66 0.581946 38.408408]
 ['2006-09-29' 245 9.0 70 0.518825 36.317752]
 ['2006-09-16' 258 11.0 68 0.486226 33.063381]
 ['2006-08-30' 275 8.0 72 0.446667 32.160051]
 ['2006-02-11' 475 5.0 65 0.164591 10.698423]]

This can also be converted to a dataframe with

df_new = pd.DataFrame(df_new, columns=df.columns)

[Out]:
     line_date daysago line_race rating        rw    wrating
0   2007-03-31      62      11.0     56       1.0       56.0
1   2007-03-10      83      11.0     67       1.0       67.0
2   2007-02-10     111       9.0     66       1.0       66.0
3   2007-01-13     139      10.0     83  0.880678  73.096278
4   2006-12-23     160      10.0     88  0.793033  69.786942
5   2006-11-09     204       9.0     52  0.636655  33.106077
6   2006-10-22     222       8.0     66  0.581946  38.408408
7   2006-09-29     245       9.0     70  0.518825  36.317752
8   2006-09-16     258      11.0     68  0.486226  33.063381
9   2006-08-30     275       8.0     72  0.446667  32.160051
10  2006-02-11     475       5.0     65  0.164591  10.698423

With regards to the most efficient solution, that would depend on how one wants to measure efficiency. Assuming that one wants to measure the time of execution, one way that one can go about doing it is with time.perf_counter().

If one measures the time of execution for all the options above, one gets the following

       method                   time
0    Option 1 0.00000110000837594271
1  Option 2.1 0.00000139995245262980
2  Option 2.2 0.00000369996996596456
3  Option 2.3 0.00000160001218318939
4    Option 3 0.00000110000837594271
5    Option 4 0.00000120000913739204
6    Option 5 0.00000140001066029072
7    Option 6 0.00000159995397552848
8    Option 7 0.00000150001142174006

enter image description here

However, this might change depending on the dataframe one uses, on the requirements (such as hardware), and more.


Notes:

8

One of the efficient and pandaic way is using eq() method:

df[~df.line_race.eq(0)]
1
  • 4
    Why not df[df.line_race.ne(0)]?
    – BSalita
    Jul 9, 2021 at 7:54
7

Another way of doing it. May not be the most efficient way as the code looks a bit more complex than the code mentioned in other answers, but still alternate way of doing the same thing.

  df = df.drop(df[df['line_race']==0].index)
6

I compiled and run my code. This is accurate code. You can try it your own.

data = pd.read_excel('file.xlsx')

If you have any special character or space in column name you can write it in '' like in the given code:

data = data[data['expire/t'].notnull()]
print (date)

If there is just a single string column name without any space or special character you can directly access it.

data = data[data.expire ! = 0]
print (date)
0
4

so many options provided(or maybe i didnt pay much attention to it, sorry if its the case), but no one mentioned this: we can use this notation in pandas: ~ (this gives us the inverse of the condition)

df = df[~df["line_race"] == 0]
1
  • you need to put ["line_race"] == 0 in brackets df = df[~df(["line_race"] == 0)] else you are attempting the NOT of a DataFrame. Feb 1, 2023 at 14:30
3

Just adding another way for DataFrame expanded over all columns:

for column in df.columns:
   df = df[df[column]!=0]

Example:

def z_score(data,count):
   threshold=3
   for column in data.columns:
       mean = np.mean(data[column])
       std = np.std(data[column])
       for i in data[column]:
           zscore = (i-mean)/std
           if(np.abs(zscore)>threshold):
               count=count+1
               data = data[data[column]!=i]
   return data,count
3

Just in case you need to delete the row, but the value can be in different columns. In my case I was using percentages so I wanted to delete the rows which has a value 1 in any column, since that means that it's the 100%

for x in df:
    df.drop(df.loc[df[x]==1].index, inplace=True)

Is not optimal if your df have too many columns.

1

If you need to remove rows based on index values, the boolean indexing in the top answer may be adapted as well. For example, in the following code, rows where the index is between 3 and 7 are removed.

df = pd.DataFrame({'A': range(10), 'B': range(50,60)})

x = df[(df.index < 3) | (df.index > 7)]
# or equivalently
y = df[~((df.index >= 3) & (df.index <= 7))]

# or using query
z = df.query("~(3 <= index <= 7)")


# if the index has a name (as in the OP), use the name
# to select rows in 2007:
df.query("line_date.dt.year == 2007")

As others have mentioned, query() is a very readable function that is perfect for this task. In fact, for large dataframes, it is the fastest method for this task (see this answer for benchmark results).

Some common questions with query():

  1. For column names with a space, use backticks.
    df = pd.DataFrame({'col A': [0, 1, 2, 0], 'col B': ['a', 'b', 'cd', 'e']})
    
    # wrap a column name with space by backticks
    x = df.query('`col A` != 0')
    
  2. To refer to variables in the local environment, prefix it with an @.
    to_exclude = [0, 2]
    y = df.query('`col A` != @to_exclude')
    
  3. Can call Series methods as well.
    # remove rows where the length of the string in column B is not 1
    z = df.query("`col B`.str.len() == 1")
    
0

It doesn't make much difference for simple example like this, but for complicated logic, I prefer to use drop() when deleting rows because it is more straightforward than using inverse logic. For example, delete rows where A=1 AND (B=2 OR C=3).

Here's a scalable syntax that is easy to understand and can handle complicated logic:

df.drop( df.query(" `line_race` == 0 ").index)
0

You can try using this:

df.drop(df[df.line_race != 0].index, inplace = True)

.

1
  • 2
    This has been already suggested here. Furthermore your solution is wrong, as OP wants to drop those rows where df['line race']==0.
    – rachwa
    Jul 30, 2022 at 12:19
0

There are several answers in this thread involving the index, and most of those answers will not work if the index has duplicates. And yes, that has been pointed out in at least one of the comments above, and it has also been pointed out that re-indexing is a way around this issue. Here is an example with a repeated index to illustrate the issue.

df = pd.DataFrame(data=[(1,'A'), (0,'B'), (1,'C')], index=[1,2,2],
                  columns=['line_race','C2'])
print("Original with a duplicate index entry:")
print(df)

df = pd.DataFrame(data=[(1,'A'), (0,'B'), (1,'C')], index=[1,2,2],
                  columns=['line_race','C2'])
df.drop(df[df.line_race == 0].index, inplace = True)
print("\nIncorrect rows removed:")
print(df)

df = pd.DataFrame(data=[(1,'A'), (0,'B'), (1,'C')], index=[1,2,2],
                  columns=['line_race','C2'])
df.reset_index(drop=False, inplace=True)
df.drop(df[df.line_race == 0].index, inplace = True)
df.set_index('index', drop=True, inplace=True)
df.index.name = None
print("\nCorrect row removed:")
print(df)

This is the output:

Original with a duplicate index entry:
   line_race C2
1          1  A
2          0  B
2          1  C

Incorrect rows removed:
   line_race C2
1          1  A

Correct row removed:
   line_race C2
1          1  A
2          1  C

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