16

I have this undecorated window:

public static void initStartPage(final Stage primaryStage) {

        final Stage startPage = new Stage();
        startPage.initStyle(StageStyle.UNDECORATED);
        //startPage.initOwner(primaryStage);
        //startPage.toFront();
        Scene scene = new Scene(agentsPanel(), 900, 500);
        startPage.setScene(scene);
        startPage.show();

    }

I would like to know how I can make it a draggable undecorated window? I want to change its position when the user selects the window with the right mouse button and then move the mouse while keeping the mouse button pressed down.

P.S. I tested this solution, but it's not working:

private static FlowPane flow;
    private static BorderPane bpi;

    public static void initStartPage(final Stage primaryStage) {

        final Stage startPage = new Stage();
        startPage.initStyle(StageStyle.UNDECORATED);
        startPage.initOwner(primaryStage);
        //startPage.toFront();
        Scene scene = new Scene(agentsPanel(primaryStage), 900, 500);
        startPage.setScene(scene);
        startPage.show();

    }

    private static double xOffset = 0;
    private static double yOffset = 0;

    public static BorderPane agentsPanel(final Stage primaryStage) {

        BorderPane bp = new BorderPane();
        bp.setPrefSize(900, 500);
        bp.setMaxSize(900, 500);

        HBox thb = new HBox(10); // Set spacing between each child into the HBox
        thb.setPadding(new Insets(15, 15, 15, 15));


        HBox bhb = new HBox(10); // Set spacing between each child into the HBox
        bhb.setPadding(new Insets(15, 15, 15, 15));

        bp.setTop(thb);
        bp.setBottom(bhb);
        bp.setCenter(navigationPanel());


        bp.setOnMousePressed(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {
            @Override
            public void handle(MouseEvent event) {
                xOffset = event.getSceneX();
                yOffset = event.getSceneY();
            }
        });
        bp.setOnMouseDragged(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {
            @Override
            public void handle(MouseEvent event) {
                primaryStage.setX(event.getScreenX() - xOffset);
                primaryStage.setY(event.getScreenY() - yOffset);
            }
        });

        return bp;

    }
35

Just change your setOnMousePressed method to this:

bp.setOnMousePressed(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {
            @Override
            public void handle(MouseEvent event) {
                xOffset = primaryStage.getX() - event.getScreenX();
                yOffset = primaryStage.getY() - event.getScreenY();
            }
        });

and your setOnMouseDragged to this:

bp.setOnMouseDragged(new EventHandler<MouseEvent>() {
            @Override
            public void handle(MouseEvent event) {
                primaryStage.setX(event.getScreenX() + xOffset);
                primaryStage.setY(event.getScreenY() + yOffset);
            }
        });
| improve this answer | |
1

The @Eeliyaanswer working well. However, code will shorter if using the below code because we don't need to declare variables.

We need to setOnMouseDragged again and again whenever setOnMouseDragged fired but I think it's not causing the problem.

bp.setOnMousePressed(pressEvent -> {
    bp.setOnMouseDragged(dragEvent -> {
        primaryStage.setX(dragEvent.getScreenX() - pressEvent.getSceneX());
        primaryStage.setY(dragEvent.getScreenY() - pressEvent.getSceneY());
    });
});

Hope it helps

| improve this answer | |
  • Works and looks pretty! – mXaln Oct 15 at 12:36
0

you can use this, works for a stage as well as an Alert (basically another stage but for pup po messages). the node is the main node of that stage

//Make a Stage Draggable
public void DraggableStage(Node node, Stage stage, Alert alert ) {
    double[] xOffset = {0}, yOffset = {0};
    node.setOnMousePressed(event -> {
        if (stage != null && alert == null){
            xOffset[0] = stage.getX() - event.getScreenX();
            yOffset[0] = stage.getY() - event.getScreenY();
        } else if(stage == null && alert != null){
            xOffset[0] = alert.getX() - event.getScreenX();
            yOffset[0] = alert.getY() - event.getScreenY();
        }
    });

    node.setOnMouseDragged(event -> {
        if (stage != null && alert == null){
            stage.setX(event.getScreenX() + xOffset[0]);
            stage.setY(event.getScreenY() + yOffset[0]);
        } else if(stage == null && alert != null){
            alert.setX(event.getScreenX() + xOffset[0]);
            alert.setY(event.getScreenY() + yOffset[0]);
        }
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • as to the content: for code hygiene: better not pass unneeded parameters - instead have dedicated methods for stage/alert each – kleopatra Aug 19 '19 at 10:42
  • why waste time and repeat code? it is matter of personal choice, you can use divide and conquer if you want but in this case I IS RELATED for the content as weel as all the other one I put in the last couple ot hours – Dan Aug 19 '19 at 10:56
  • please edit them to follow naming conventions .. makes it much easier for others to read and understand – kleopatra Aug 19 '19 at 11:04
  • you are applying offset to the main panel to dragg the stage (windows in javafx) so.... the naming convention for me is ok, anyway could be as the developer wants – Dan Aug 19 '19 at 11:06
  • well, actually .. no: conventions are there for a reason (make code easier to read and understand at a glance). And no, on java planet, a method starting with a capital letter is a violation of convention, always - if you don't see that (yet), you might want to read up on them (see my first comment) – kleopatra Aug 19 '19 at 11:11

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