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I'm writing some software that creates matplotlib plots of simulation data. Since these plotting routines are often running in a headless environment, I've chosen to use the matplotlib object oriented interface explicitly assign canvases to figures only just before they are saved. This means I cannot use pylab or pyplot based solutions for this issue.

I've added some special sauce so the plots show up inline either by invoking a display method on the plot object or by invoking __repr__. However, the check I'm doing to determine if a user is running under IPython (checking for "__IPYTHON__" in dir(__builtin__)) cannot discriminate whether the user is in a notebook or just a regular terminal session where inline figures won't work.

Is there some way to programatically check whether a code snippet has been executed in a notebook, qt console, or terminal IPython session? Am I doing something silly here - I haven't looked too closely at the display semantics so perhaps I'm ignorant about some portion of the IPython internal API that will take care of this for me.

marked as duplicate by Ani Menon, Community Nov 14 '16 at 20:23

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Answerd many time : No you cant.

How can I check if code is executed in the IPython notebook?

Same kernel can be connected to notebook, qtconsole and terminal at the same time, even to many at once.

Your question is like a TV star asking "how can I know if the person watching me on tv is male of female? ". It does not make sens.

Don't invoke _repr_*_ yourself. Try to import display, make it no-op if import fail. that should be sufficient to both in python or IPython not.

Better return object instead of displaying. The display hook will work by itself in IPython if the object has a _repr_png_ or equivalent.

  • Thank you, clearly I didn't search hard enough before posting. – ngoldbaum Aug 12 '13 at 1:47

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