4

I want to write generic class which is intended to work with built-in types like byte and ushort. In internal computations I need to cast generic type to integer and back to generic type. I found the way to compile such code, for example:

class Test<T> where T : struct, IConvertible
{
    public static T TestFunction(T x)
    {
        int n = Convert.ToInt32(x);
        T result = (T)Convert.ChangeType(n, typeof(T));
        return result;
    }
}

I think that using such conversions may significantly reduce performance, if they are used in computation loops. Is there a better way to make these conversions?

4
  • 5
    What are your benchmarks for the performance of this, otherwise what are people to improve against? Not to mention how you know it's even a real problem at all. Aug 12, 2013 at 8:18
  • @GrantThomas - both Convert.ToInt32 and Convert.ChangeType accept Object parameter. This means, this code requires boxing. I can ask this by another way: is it possible to avoid boxing?
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 8:37
  • You could, and could even make it quicker, but that still doesn't make it a problem. Aug 12, 2013 at 8:39
  • .net optimizes for 32bit integers anyway. See link Aug 12, 2013 at 8:54

2 Answers 2

2

int to T conversion is a bit tricky. I think you could use Expression class here.

Test<T> class should can look like that:

class Test<T> where T : struct, IConvertible
{
    private static Func<int, T> _getInt;

    static Test()
    {
        var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(int), "x");
        UnaryExpression body = Expression.Convert(param, typeof(T));
        _getInt = Expression.Lambda<Func<int, T>>(body, param).Compile();
    }

    public static T TestFunction(T x)
    {
        int n = Convert.ToInt32(x);
        T result = _getInt(n);
        return result;
    }
}

It prepares _getInt = x => (T)x for you in static constructor and uses it later, to convert int to T.

8
  • Thanks, using precompiled lambda improves the function performance.
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 12:03
  • 1
    I mate precompiled lambda also in another direction (T to int) and got significant performance boost on histogram calculation.
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 13:11
  • This cuts more than 50% of execution time! Histogram function wasted most of its time on boxing, which is part of Convert.ToInt32 and Convert.ChangeType functions.
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 13:23
  • That's really interesting! I'm gonna perform some tests myself later! What type is T in your test suite? Because Convert.ToInt32 has an overload which takes byte as parameter, so there should be no boxing there. Aug 12, 2013 at 13:27
  • OK, I see what's happening here. Actually, Convert.ToInt32(byte) is much better than byte.ToInt32! Aug 12, 2013 at 13:32
1

After some thinking, I'm happy that thanks to the question and some answers I have resolved an old problem of mine: using operations on generic T:

First the example with Cast (as requested by the OP)

public static class Cast<T, U>
{
    public static readonly Func<T, U> Do;

    static Cast()
    {
        var par1 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));

        Do = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, U>>(Expression.Convert(par1, typeof(U)), par1).Compile();
    }
}

And then an example with multiplication:

public static class Multiply<T>
{
    public static readonly Func<T, T, T> Do;

    static Multiply()
    {
        var par1 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));
        var par2 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));

        Do = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, T>>(Expression.Multiply(par1, par2), par1, par2).Compile();
    }
}

The use is quite simple:

int x = Conv<T, int>.Do(someTValue);

in the end a static class is created, with a single field that is a readonly static property named Do that is a delegate that "points" to an operation built with an Expression tree.

The multiplication is similar:

T res = Multiply<T, T>.Do(someTValue1, someTValue2);

The multiplication is somewhat 3x slower in the general case than a direct multiplication (in Release mode, no debugging).

Clearly doing the other operations is simple by starting from Multiplication

(it's interesting that I knew quite well of Expression trees, but I hadn't ever thought of using static classes as "dictionaries" for containing the various types. I always did something like Dictionary<Type, Delegate> instead of letting the .NET "handle" the Dictionary through generic class specialization.)

4
  • Very interesting. Dynamic beats boxing? I am testing this now, thanks.
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 8:42
  • @AlexFarber I haven't done any pure boxing method. You can't purely unbox to another type. If T is long, and T x, (int)(object)x is InvalidCastException. Try int res = (int)(object)5L
    – xanatos
    Aug 12, 2013 at 8:46
  • It was really interesting. Surprisingly, using dynamic gives the same performance, as using Convert functions. Using expressions gives better performance, thanks.
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 11:56
  • I wish to accept your answer, especially after strange downvotes, but you replaced it with the answer to your own question :) I give an upvote and accept another answer. Hopefully, this discussion will help to SO users.
    – Alex F
    Aug 12, 2013 at 12:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.