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here is sample program to get the month or year or time request from multiple client to server in server program, here i am not able to send "Fri Jan 11 11:59:51 2008" the full string from buffer in server program to client.only Fri alone read in the client.

SERVER program

#include<stdio.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
#include<sys/socket.h>
#include<netinet/in.h>
#include<string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include<sys/stat.h>
#include<time.h>

int main(int argc,char **argv) {
    int len,ch=0;
    int sockfd,newfd;
    struct sockaddr_in servaddr,cliaddr;
    char str[1000];

    sockfd=socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);
    if(sockfd<0)
        printf("cannot create socket");

    bzero(&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));

    servaddr.sin_family=AF_INET;
    servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr=INADDR_ANY;      
    servaddr.sin_port=htons(7220);

    if(bind(sockfd,(struct sockaddr*)&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr))<0)
        printf("Bind error");

    listen(sockfd,5);

    len=sizeof(cliaddr);
    time_t current_time = time(NULL);
    struct tm* local_time = localtime(&current_time); 
    char *buff=asctime(local_time);
    int leng=sizeof(buff);

    //strcpy(buff,buff1);

    printf("%d",leng);
    printf("%s",buff);

    int n=0;

    while(1) {
        newfd=accept(sockfd,(struct sockaddr*)&cliaddr,&len);
        printf("request from client%d",n++);
        n=write(newfd,buff,sizeof(buff));
        //n=write(newfd,buff1+1,sizeof(buff1));
        printf("message sent to client%d",n);
    }

    close(newfd);
    close(sockfd);
}

CLIENT program

#include<stdio.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
#include<sys/socket.h>
#include<netinet/in.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main(int argc,char **argv) {
    int len;
    int sockfd,n;
    struct sockaddr_in servaddr,cliaddr;
    char str[7][100],st[3][100];
    int d,m,choice=0;
    char buff[1024],buff1[1024];

    sockfd=socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);
    bzero(&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));

    servaddr.sin_family=AF_INET;
    servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr=inet_addr(argv[1]);
    servaddr.sin_port=htons(7220);

    connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr*)&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));

    bzero(&buff,sizeof(buff));
    bzero(&buff1,sizeof(buff1));

    n=read(sockfd,buff,sizeof(buff));

    printf("hai");  

    puts(buff);

    //puts(buff1);
    /*strcpy(str[1],strtok(buff," "));
    strcpy(str[2],strtok(NULL," "));
    strcpy(str[0],strtok(NULL," "));
    strcpy(str[4],strtok(NULL," "));
    strcpy(str[3],strtok(NULL," "));        
    while(choice!=6) {
        printf("\n\nMENU\n");
        printf("1.DATE\n");
        printf("2.DAY\n");
        printf("3.MONTH\n");
        printf("4.YEAR\n");
        printf("5.TIME\n");
        printf("6.EXIT\n");
        printf("ENTER CHOICE\n");
        scanf("%d",&choice);
        switch(choice) {
          case 1: printf("date %s",str[0]);
            break;
          case 2: printf("day %s",str[1]);
            break;
          case 3: printf("month %s",str[2]);
            break;
          case 4: printf("year %s",str[3]);
            break;
          case 5: printf("time %s",str[4]);
            break;
        }
    }*/

    close(sockfd);
    return 0;
}
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  • You can not expect read() to read the amount of data passed in to read as 3rd parameter. It might return earlier. Always check the value returned by read(). The same applies to write(). From this fact you shall conclude that the number of calls to write() do not need to match the number of call to read() for transfering a certain amount of data. TCP/IP is stream oriented.
    – alk
    Commented Aug 12, 2013 at 16:21
  • How will the receiver know how much data it shall wait for?
    – alk
    Commented Aug 12, 2013 at 16:26
  • 2
    @alk: The receiver needs to either know ahead of time the number of bytes to read, like in the HTTP chunked protocol, or it needs to look for a delimiter, such as a newline, or it needs to continue reading until the socket is closed.
    – Zan Lynx
    Commented Aug 12, 2013 at 17:24
  • In your server, you need to close the newfd inside the while(1) loop. Right now you are overwriting the last newfd without closing it when you accept a new connection. Commented Apr 27, 2016 at 0:44

1 Answer 1

8

The problem is in the server code:

n=write(newfd,buff,sizeof(buff));

should be

n=write(newfd,buff,strlen(buff) + 1);

sizeof(buff) will not return the length of buff, but the size of its type. buff is a pointer, so sizeof(buff) will be equal to 4 (this is your case I guess) or 8, depending on your system.

If sizeof(buff) == 4, you will send the first 4 characters of buff, which will be 'Fri' (notice the space, which is a character too).

strlen() will return you the length of the string, and that's what you want.

EDIT: alk's comment is right : You can have some trouble with read. See ZanLynx's comment on the question.

3
  • @nouney: The OP is in the unlucky situtation that the call to read() might block endlessly as long as the number of bytes sent is less then what the OP tells read() to read, that is sizeof(buff).
    – alk
    Commented Aug 12, 2013 at 16:24
  • Don'[t forget to send the trailing nul, you want strlen(buf)+1 or your string terminator is uninitialized.
    – jthill
    Commented Aug 12, 2013 at 17:01
  • Please see ZanLynx's comment to the OP.
    – alk
    Commented Aug 13, 2013 at 6:36

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