20

When I use JDK5 like below

ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();  
     for (Integer i : list) { 

      //cannot check if already reached last item

   }

on the other hand if I just use an Iterator

ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
  for (Iterator i = list.iterator(); i.hasNext();) {

          //i can check whether this is last item
          if(i.hasNextItem()){
          }

    }

How can I check if I've already reached last item with for (Integer i : list) {

36

One way to do that is to use a counter:

ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
...
int size = list.size();
for (Integer i : list) { 
    ...
    if (--size == 0) {
        // Last item.
        ...
    }
}

Edit

Anyway, as Tom Hawtin said, it is sometimes better to use the "old" syntax when you need to get the current index information, by using a for loop or the iterator, as everything you win when using the Java5 syntax will be lost in the loop itself...

for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
    ...

    if (i == (list.size() - 1)) {
        // Last item...
    }
}

or

for (Iterator it = list.iterator(); it.hasNext(); ) {
    ...

    if (!it.hasNext()) {
        // Last item...
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Shouldn't that be !it.hasNext() to determine the last entry ? – Brian Agnew Nov 30 '09 at 9:44
  • And i == list.size()-1 in the other example (iterators are generally easier to get right than indexes, although the syntax is a bit long-winded). – Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 30 '09 at 10:05
  • +1 for the first example - using a decrementing counter is very efficient – Alnitak Nov 30 '09 at 11:33
9

Sometimes it's just better to use an iterator.

(Allegedly, "85%" of the requests for an index in the posh for loop is for implementing a String join method (which you can easily do without).)

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Or which you can do with apache commons StringUtils.join ;) – phtrivier Nov 30 '09 at 10:15
  • phtrivier: If you are already dependent upon Apache Commons Lang. I wouldn't introduce a dependency just for that. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 30 '09 at 10:24
  • @Tom - There's still a good old join hack that works with for expressions: String join = "x"; StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder(); for(Integer i : x) buf.append(i).append(join); String result = buf.substring(0, buf.length() - join.length()); – Thomas Jung Nov 30 '09 at 11:34
  • 1
    Thomas: I prefer: StringBuilder buff = new StringBuilder(); String sep = ""; for (Integer i : x) { buff.append(sep).append(i); sep = "x"; } String str = buff.toString();. No hacky substring. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 30 '09 at 12:06
  • 1
    FYI, String.join() seems a likely candidate to be in JDK 7. – Kevin Bourrillion Dec 1 '09 at 21:41
4

The API does not support that directly. You can use the for(int i..) loop and count the elements or use subLists(0, size - 1) and handle the last element explicitly:

  if(x.isEmpty()) return;
  int last = x.size() - 1;
  for(Integer i : x.subList(0, last)) out.println(i);
  out.println("last " + x.get(last));

This is only useful if it does not introduce redundancy. It performs better than the counting version (after the subList overhead is amortized). (Just in case you cared after the boxing anyway).

| improve this answer | |
  • Nice, but you should add a check that the list has at least one element (or potentially, is not empty). – Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 30 '09 at 10:06
3

Another way, you can use a pass-through object to capture the last value and then do something with it:

List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
Integer lastValue = null;
for (Integer i : list) {
    // do stuff
    lastValue = i;
}
// do stuff with last value
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I think he wants to do specific treatment inside the loop when he reaches the last item, not getting the last integer of the list. For that, you can also do list.get(list.size() - 1); – Romain Linsolas Nov 30 '09 at 9:38
  • I understand, however I'm showing here the general idea of capturing the last object. The question is a bit vague in that sense that he doesn't really say what he wants to do, just how he wants to do it. – Esko Nov 30 '09 at 10:29

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