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Why is the following html file showing title as default in IE? The other browsers show title as mytitle.

<script>
window.mylib = window.mylib || {};
mylib.title = 'mytitle';
</script>

<script>
var mylib = mylib || {};
document.title = mylib.title || 'default';
</script>

Does IE create a separate scope for each of the script tags?

And is that just a bug or why does the behavior differ?

(tested in IE8 and latest chrome/ff/opera)

marked as duplicate by Salman A, Frédéric Hamidi, Bergi, Sergio, fedorqui Aug 13 '13 at 9:45

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  • Might be a hoisting bug. I imagine var mylib = window.mylib || {}; makes your second script work as expected? – Frédéric Hamidi Aug 12 '13 at 12:49
  • Actually not, I thought it would though. – Martin Hansen Aug 12 '13 at 12:51
  • Might not be a bug but rather a difference in the spec. IE8 is an ECMAScript 3 browser while IE9+, Chrome, etc. are ES5 browsers. Couldn't say what of ES3 would cause that, though. – Jonathan Lonowski Aug 12 '13 at 12:51
  • @Martin, there is a good way to be sure. If you rename var mylib to var _mylib in the second snippet, does the code work? If that's the case, it looks like redefining mylib in the global scope (through var) overwrites the existing window.mylib. – Frédéric Hamidi Aug 12 '13 at 12:54
  • couldn't it really be that var mylib doesn't get hoisted up to the very top but only to the top of the script tag. That would result in mylib being redefined as undefined in the second tag. You could try to omit the var and check what happens then. – basilikum Aug 12 '13 at 13:01

HTML <script> tags Javascript are executed in the scope of the window. Thus, separated script tags are executed on the same scope.

Specifically with IE7, try not re-defining the variable on the second time:

Instead of

var mylib = mylib || {};

use

mylib = window.mylib || {};

IE7 probably overwrites the definition of mylib when var mylib is encountered.

  • 2
    If they are on the same scope in IE then mylib would be the same as window.mylib no? – Martin Hansen Aug 12 '13 at 12:53

Scope shouldn't be an issue. Each <script> should be evaluated within the same global scope.

However, window.mylib = ... doesn't appear to be considered an actual declaration in IE8. So, following it with a var mylib causes an override / reset to undefined.

<script>
  window.mylib = {};
</script>

<script>
  console.log(typeof window.mylib); // object
</script>

<script>
  var mylib;
  console.log(typeof window.mylib); // undefined
</script>

It should work as expected when using either var mylib or window.mylib throughout. Seems it's just the mixture that's the problem.

<script>
  var mylib = mylib || {};
  mylib.title = 'mytitle';
</script>

<script>
  var mylib = mylib || {};
  document.title = mylib.title || 'default'; // 'mytitle'
</script>

You are initializing window.mylib in the first <script> tag. In the second <script> tag you are initializing var mylib with mylib not window.mylib. And then checking the value of title against this. There seems some logic issues if I am able to understand it correctly.

The <script>s are scoped to the window so it does not matter how many you have and in which one you are accessing the variables or functions as long as they are properly defined and/or initialized.

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