79

I know that if I want to re-raise an exception, I simple use raise without arguments in the respective except block. But given a nested expression like

try:
    something()
except SomeError as e:
    try:
        plan_B()
    except AlsoFailsError:
        raise e  # I'd like to raise the SomeError as if plan_B()
                 # didn't raise the AlsoFailsError

how can I re-raise the SomeError without breaking the stack trace? raise alone would in this case re-raise the more recent AlsoFailsError. Or how could I refactor my code to avoid this issue?

  • 2
    Have you tried putting plan_B in another function that returns True on success, and False on exception? Then the outer except block could just be if not try_plan_B(): raise – Drew McGowen Aug 12 '13 at 13:46
  • @DrewMcGowen Unfortunately the more realistic case is that this is inside a function accepting arbitrary objects arg and I'd try calling arg.plan_B() which might raise an AttributeError due to arg not providing a plan B – Tobias Kienzler Aug 12 '13 at 13:47
  • Have a look at the traceback module: docs.python.org/2/library/traceback.html#traceback-examples – Paco Aug 12 '13 at 13:51
  • @Paco Thanks, I will (Though an answer already shows a simpler way) – Tobias Kienzler Aug 12 '13 at 13:52
  • @DrewMcGowen I wrote up an answer based on your comment, which looks less pythonic than user4815162342's answer though. But that's due to my wanting to also have a return value and allowing plan_B to raise exceptions – Tobias Kienzler Aug 12 '13 at 14:11
92

You can store the exception type, value, and traceback in local variables and use the three-argument form of raise:

try:
    something()
except SomeError:
    t, v, tb = sys.exc_info()
    try:
        plan_B()
    except AlsoFailsError:
        raise t, v, tb

In Python 3 the traceback is stored in the exception, so raise e will do the (mostly) right thing:

try:
    something()
except SomeError as e:
    try:
        plan_B()
    except AlsoFailsError:
        raise e

The only problem with the above is that it will produce a slightly misleading traceback that tells you that SomeError occurred while handling AlsoFailsError (because of raise e inside except AlsoFailsError), where in fact the almost exact opposite occurred - we handled AlsoFailsError while trying to recover from SomeError. To disable this behavior and get a traceback that never mentions AlsoFailsError, replace raise e with raise e from None.

  • Perfect, that's what I just also found here, thanks! Though there the suggestion is raise self.exc_info[1], None, self.exc_info[2] after self.exc_info = sys.exc_info() - putting [1] to first position for some reason – Tobias Kienzler Aug 12 '13 at 13:48
  • 3
    @TobiasKienzler raise t, None, tb will lose the value of the exception and will force raise to re-instantiate it from the type, giving you a less specific (or simply incorrect) exception value. For example, if the raised exception is KeyError("some-key"), it will just re-raise KeyError() and omit the exact missing key from the traceback. – user4815162342 Aug 12 '13 at 13:53
  • So your solution is better. In fact that other post seems to call raise v, None, tb, which should probably fail due to the exception's class missing. Hm, sys.exc_info() has a pretty red warning about assigning the traceback value to a local variable, does this require being taken care of in this case? edit Ah, there's a box below stating that starting from 2.2 that's handled automatically though it should still be avoided when possible – Tobias Kienzler Aug 12 '13 at 13:56
  • 3
    @TobiasKienzler It should still possible to express that in Python 3 as raise v.with_traceback(tb). (Your comment even says as much, except it proposes to re-instantiate the value.) – user4815162342 Aug 12 '13 at 14:42
  • 2
    Also, the red warning not to store sys.exc_info() in a local variable made sense prior to Python 2.0 (released 13 years ago), but borders on ridiculous today. Modern Python would be near-useless without the cycle collector, as every non-trivial Python library creates cycles without pause and depends on their correct cleanup. – user4815162342 Aug 12 '13 at 14:44
15

Even if the accepted solution is right, it's good to point to the Six library which has a Python 2+3 solution, using six.reraise.

six.reraise(exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback=None)

Reraise an exception, possibly with a different traceback. [...]

So, you can write:

import six


try:
    something()
except SomeError:
    t, v, tb = sys.exc_info()
    try:
        plan_B()
    except AlsoFailsError:
        six.reraise(t, v, tb)
  • 1
    Good point - speaking of Six you can also use six.raise_from if you want to include information that plan_B() also failed. – Tobias Kienzler Sep 28 '17 at 10:31
  • 1
    @TobiasKienzler: I think it's a different usage: with six.raise_from you create a new exception which is linked to a previous one, you don't re-raise, so the trace back is different. – Laurent LAPORTE Sep 28 '17 at 10:40
  • 1
    My point exactly - if you reraise you get the impression only something() threw SomeError, if you raise_from you also know that this caused plan_B() to be executed but throwing the AlsoFailsError. So it depends on the usecase. I think raise_from will make debugging easier – Tobias Kienzler Sep 28 '17 at 10:45
9

As per Drew McGowen's suggestion, but taking care of a general case (where a return value s is present), here's an alternative to user4815162342's answer:

try:
    s = something()
except SomeError as e:
    def wrapped_plan_B():
        try:
            return False, plan_B()
        except:
            return True, None
    failed, s = wrapped_plan_B()
    if failed:
        raise
  • 1
    The nice thing about this approach is that it works unchanged in Python 2 and 3. – user4815162342 Feb 3 '17 at 18:21
  • 2
    @user4815162342 Good point :) Though meanwhile in Python3 I'd consider raise from, so the stack trace would also let me se plan B failed. Which can be emulated in Python 2 by the way. – Tobias Kienzler Feb 4 '17 at 21:30
4

Python 3.5+ attaches the traceback information to the error anyway, so it's no longer necessary to save it separately.

>>> def f():
...   try:
...     raise SyntaxError
...   except Exception as e:
...     err = e
...     try:
...       raise AttributeError
...     except Exception as e1:
...       raise err from None
>>> f()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 9, in f
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in f
SyntaxError: None
>>> 
  • 2
    The question is about another exception happening during the except. But you're right, when I replace err = e by, say, raise AttributeError, you get first the SyntaxError stack trace, followed by a During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred: and the AttributeError stack trace. Good to know, though unfortunately one cannot rely on 3.5+ being installed. PS: ff verstehen nicht-Deutsche vermutlich nicht ;) – Tobias Kienzler Apr 26 '17 at 5:45
  • OK, so I changed the example to raise another exception, which (as the original question asked for) gets ignored when I re-raise the first one. – Matthias Urlichs Apr 26 '17 at 9:06
  • 2
    @TobiasKienzler 3.5+ (which I changed it to) seems to be a globally recognized format. Was denkst du? ;) – linusg Apr 5 '18 at 22:33
  • @linusg Agreed :) – Tobias Kienzler Apr 6 '18 at 9:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.