16

Sometimes I see JavaScript that is written with an argument provided that already has a set value or is an object with methods. Take this jQuery example for instance:

$(".selector").children().each(function(i) {
    console.log(i);
});

When logging i, you would get the value of whatever i is in that iteration when looking at the selectors children in the jQuery each method.

Take this Node.js example:

http.createServer(function(request, response) {
    response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
    response.write("Hello World");
    response.end();
}).listen(8888);

You can see here that request and response are being passed and they contain their own methods that can be acted on.

To me, this looks like were passing a function to the createServer function with two arguments that have methods already attached to them.

My question is a multipart one:

  1. Where do these arguments come from?
  2. If these are just anon functions, how do they receive arguments that can be acted on like other functions?
  3. How do I create functions that can take my own arguments like this??
  4. Does this use the power of closures??
15

To me, this looks like were passing a function to the createServer function with two arguments that have methods already attached to them.

No. They were passing a function to createServer that takes two arguments. Those functions will later be called with whatever argument the caller puts in. e.g.:

function caller(otherFunction) {
     otherFunction(2);
 }
caller(function(x) {
    console.log(x); 
});

Will print 2.

More advanced, if this isn't what you want you can use the bind method belong to all functions, which will create a new function with specified arguments already bound. e.g.:

caller(function(x) {
    console.log(x);
}.bind(null, 3);
});

Will now print 3, and the argument 2 passed to the anonymous function will become an unused and unnamed argument.

Anyway, that is a dense example; please check the linked documentation for bind to understand how binding works better.

  • 1
    @SethenMaleno request and response are just parameters for the createServer method. When that method is actually called, it will be passed two objects, representing a request and a response that you can manipulate. Declaring parameters just sets up what the function is expecting; the magic happens when the function is called – Ian Aug 12 '13 at 20:30
  • 2
    @SethenMaleno You aren't passing them as arguments. You're declaring them as parameters. Your code says "Call http.createServer and pass this function. When the server is ready, call that function I just provided and pass it two arguments." In your function, you reference those two arguments as request and response – Ian Aug 12 '13 at 20:35
  • 1
    @SethenMaleno So, just like normal function parameters, the parameter names are just aliases. You are just saying "Inside this function, I want the first argument passed to it to be referenced as request...and the second argument passed to it to be referenced as response". When node actually calls your function, it passes two (very) complex objects (the arguments), which have properties/methods (such as .write()). – Ian Aug 12 '13 at 20:46
  • 1
    @Ian I created a jsfiddle to what I think (on a small scale) the code is doing, take a look: jsfiddle.net/NEyFy/1 – Sethen Aug 12 '13 at 21:28
  • 1
    @SethenMaleno Yes! That's exactly right. I should've just done that in the first place to help explain – Ian Aug 12 '13 at 21:41
3

Let's take a look at $.each for the example:

each: function (obj, callback, args) {
    var value,
    i = 0,
        length = obj.length,
        isArray = isArraylike(obj);

    if (args) {
        if (isArray) {
            for (; i < length; i++) {
                value = callback.apply(obj[i], args);

                if (value === false) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (i in obj) {
                value = callback.apply(obj[i], args);

                if (value === false) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        // A special, fast, case for the most common use of each
    } else {
        if (isArray) {
            for (; i < length; i++) {
                value = callback.call(obj[i], i, obj[i]);

                if (value === false) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (i in obj) {
                value = callback.call(obj[i], i, obj[i]);

                if (value === false) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return obj;
}

This gets called from

$(".selector").children().each(function(i) {
    console.log(i);
});

like:

return $.each.call(this, callback /* this is your function */, args /* which is an additional thing people rarely use*/ )

This is the line (in the first block) you want to look at

callback.call(obj[i], i, obj[i]);

It's calling the callback, and passing the object as the context – this is why you can use this in the loop. Then the iteration i and then the same object as the context are both sent as arguments to the callback. It's a little bit like magic; until you look at the source code.

1

Here's a example of passing parameters into anonymous function

    var a = 'hello';

    // Crockford
    (function(a){alert(a)}(a));

    // Others
    (function(a){alert(a)})(a);

It uses closure, since it's an anonymous function (it actually all depends how you wrote it)

0

Yes, you are passing functions as arguments. The functions that you pass will of course have their own arguments.

And, these arguments can be anything including objects which may have their own methods, etc.

http.createServer will accept a function and it will know how may arguments that function has. One way to to do this is to check the arguments property of the passed in function. Or the api developer may have used the actual elements.

The writer of this function will know what is expected as arguments and will document it in the api documentation.

0

If you looked at the code for createServer, it'd look something like this:

function createServer (handleRequestAndResponseFunction) {
    handleRequestAndResponseFunction(actualRequest, actualReponse);
}

ok, no it wouldn't, but it's a simple example. createServer takes a function that accepts two arguments.

In more realistic terms, when you pass in that function of two arguments, it does whatever middleware processing and stuff that it needs to, and then calls that function, passing its own request and response variables.

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