224

I am a beginner in C++. I have come across override keyword used in the header file that I am working on. May I know, what is real use of override, perhaps with an example would be easy to understand.

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  • 1
    Note also c++11 introduced the final keyword. – Jesse Good Aug 12 '13 at 23:36
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    @JesseGood and again: final also is not a keyword !!! – zaufi Aug 12 '13 at 23:56
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    @zaufi it's a contextual keyword – phuclv Sep 13 '17 at 8:53
344

The override keyword serves two purposes:

  1. It shows the reader of the code that "this is a virtual method, that is overriding a virtual method of the base class."
  2. The compiler also knows that it's an override, so it can "check" that you are not altering/adding new methods that you think are overrides.

To explain the latter:

class base
{
  public:
    virtual int foo(float x) = 0; 
};


class derived: public base
{
   public:
     int foo(float x) override { ... } // OK
}

class derived2: public base
{
   public:
     int foo(int x) override { ... } // ERROR
};

In derived2 the compiler will issue an error for "changing the type". Without override, at most the compiler would give a warning for "you are hiding virtual method by same name".

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    shouldn't the function header for* foo* be similar in class derived2 ?? I compiled this with VS2017 and got a compile error. I mean that inderived2 foo's header must be: *int foo ( float x) override {...} * – Fatemeh Karimi Apr 23 '17 at 19:04
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    Uhm, that's entirely the point, the code example shows how override can be used to detect an error! – Mats Petersson Apr 24 '17 at 6:43
  • I think #3 is that override can be used to detect the to-be-overridden function (belonging to the parent class/interface) is removed (not alternated). This is useful if the subclass is expecting a callback but it will never happen due to the library change, etc. – Hei Mar 11 '18 at 5:32
  • I don't think the compiler can do that without scanning all of the call-graph, and if the compiler does that, it won't need override to understand that. It's really hard to achieve that. – Mats Petersson Mar 11 '18 at 7:48
72

And as an addendum to all answers, FYI: override is not a keyword, but a special kind of identifier! It has meaning only in the context of declaring/defining virtual functions, in other contexts it's just an ordinary identifier. For details read 2.11.2 of The Standard.

#include <iostream>

struct base
{
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

struct derived : base
{
    virtual void foo() override
    {
        std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    base* override = new derived();
    override->foo();
    return 0;
}

Output:

zaufi@gentop /work/tests $ g++ -std=c++11 -o override-test override-test.cc
zaufi@gentop /work/tests $ ./override-test
virtual void derived::foo()
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    It works (here and for final) because you can't use regular identifiers where these contextual keywords would be placed. – CTMacUser Aug 16 '13 at 20:51
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    why the hell it's not forbidden? – Ferenc Dajka Oct 14 '16 at 9:39
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    @FerencDajka 1. Why should it be? 2. Suddenly adding a new keyword (i.e. forbidding the use of it everywhere else) would break backwards compatibility. – idmean Feb 5 '17 at 8:13
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    ordinal or ordinary ? – v.oddou Feb 21 '19 at 8:46
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    @krubo isocpp.org/std/the-standard The word "standard" refers to something that is officially agreed upon internationally. For example, the definition of how long a meter is is a standard – Michael Mar 22 at 7:09
10

override is a C++11 keyword which means that a method is an "override" from a method from a base class. Consider this example:

   class Foo
   {
   public:
        virtual void func1();
   }

   class Bar : public Foo
   {
   public:
        void func1() override;
   }

If B::func1() signature doesn't equal A::func1() signature a compilation error will be generated because B::func1() does not override A::func1(), it will define a new method called func1() instead.

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    According to C++ specification, "override" is an "identifier with special meaning". But such things in C# are called contextual keywords. – Denis Gladkiy Aug 13 '13 at 3:06
2

Wikipedia says:

Method overriding, in object oriented programming, is a language feature that allows a subclass or child class to provide a specific implementation of a method that is already provided by one of its superclasses or parent classes.

In detail, when you have an object foo that has a void hello() function:

class foo {
    virtual void hello(); // Code : printf("Hello!");
}

A child of foo, will also have a hello() function:

class bar : foo {
    // no functions in here but yet, you can call
    // bar.hello()
}

However, you may want to print "Hello Bar!" when hello() function is being called from a bar object. You can do this using override

class bar : foo {
    virtual void hello() override; // Code : printf("Hello Bar!");
}
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    You don't need the override identifier to do this in C++, it simply enforces that you are doing it properly. – Goose Oct 1 '14 at 22:53

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