18

I know that a $scope from a controller can be shared to a link function in directives.

For example, in this code I can call a function from declared controller to print 'Hello World' on browser console:

 .directive('myDirective', [function () {
        return {
            restrict : 'E',
            replace : true,
            controller: 'MyController',
            templateUrl : 'directives/myDirective.tpl.html',
            link : function (scope, elem, attrs, controller) {
                scope.message = 'Hello World!';
            }
        };
    }])

    .controller('MyController', [function ($scope, $element, $attrs, $log, $timeout) {

        // $timeout to wait the link function to be ready.
        $timeout(function () {
            // This prints Hello World as expected.
            $log.debug($scope.message);
         });


        });
    }])

Ok, this works fine.

My questions are:

  1. In this approach, it is the SAME scope that will shared between the controller and the directive?
  2. What is the consequences to use this approach? Let us assume that I will not manipulate DOM elements in controller, only in link function.
  3. I really need to avoid manipulate DOM elements in this controller? Even if the $scope, $elem, etc are the same?

These are questions that I didn't find on Angular Directive documentation.

Here's a plunker with the sample code.

  • 1
    I recommend checking out the egghead directive videos. These were really useful for me. egghead.io – Mark Meyer Aug 13 '13 at 0:43
  • @NuclearGhost thanks for the comment. I already saw almost of all egghead videos. I also checked again today to find some update... but I don't remember he saying somenthing about what I asked here in any of the videos =( – Deividi Cavarzan Aug 13 '13 at 1:17
  • it didnt console log out "Hello World" it logged undefined – David Chase Aug 13 '13 at 1:18
  • @DavidChase My bad, since the controller was instantiated before link function, I need to use timeout before call $log.debug to make sure that $compile function was called. I'll update the question. – Deividi Cavarzan Aug 13 '13 at 1:20
14

In this approach, it is the SAME scope that will shared between the controller and the directive?

Yes, it is.

What is the consequences to use this approach? Let us assume that I will not manipulate DOM elements in controller, only in link function.

The controller is what provides the directive's behavior, just like with a regular Angular application. That said, you should manipulate the scope inside the controller function only. If you need to change the scope from the link function, call a method of it. Besides, since the controller is executed before the link function, you should initialized the scope in the former so the latter can get a valid model to work on.

I really need to avoid manipulate DOM elements in this controller? Even if the $scope, $elem, etc are the same?

By definition, the link function is the place to perform DOM manipulation. I can't find a technical reason that would prevent you from manipulating the DOM inside the directive's controller except that you shouldn't. In fact, in order to check that I've just changed one directive I've written and moved all the code from the link function to the controller function and everything's kept working. But if you mix both scope logic and DOM manipulation together I think it'll be hard to track down what's going on.

Finally, you may find this article useful: Understanding Directives.

  • All of the answers was well formed and well explained. But I need to choose one. Thanks for the amazing article that I didn't read yet (Yes, I've never looked at angular wiki on gh until now and was there all the time!), It was very helpful for me. – Deividi Cavarzan Aug 15 '13 at 18:55
  • @MichaelBenford the reason you do not put DOM manipulation into the controllers is because they are meant for scope object initialization and scope object augmentation via methods that contain only "business logic" also testing becomes very hard. – David Chase Aug 15 '13 at 22:17
  • 1
    I guess I've said that, just with other words :) – Michael Benford Aug 15 '13 at 22:38
5

1) Yes they both share the same scope, because you are using the controller of the directive to log the scope, which means you can put the 'MyController' inside of the directive like so

return {
  replace: true,
  controller: function($scope,...){ //  equals MyController
  }
}

If the controller is a wrapper of the directive instead of inside it and the directive scope is set to true or an object hash, then they wont share the same scope.

2) No consequences, just DO NOT manipulate DOM in the controller, one of uses of the controller is to connect the directives together to get or set data from perhaps a service or by a simple augmentation of the scope (ie: scope.message = "Hello World") either way they need to be minimal. The way you have it setup is ideal if you want to share data amongst other directives you can simply require this directive's controller.

3) Yes avoid DOM manipulation in the controller, its not meant for presentation logic or what the user sees, that is the role of the directives, remember SOC(separation of concerns) each part of the MVC/MV* pattern has its own roll to play.

Think of it in a simple way like this user sees button on presentation layer, user clicks button a function for the click of the button occurs on the business layer (controller) that takes the results and stores in the data/model layer.

Caveat if the button does anything other than process a command (calculations,evaluations,etc) between user and data layer, such as adding classes (DOM manipulation) that function belongs inside a directive.

A great read and more in depth here

1

See updated plunker: http://plnkr.co/edit/pT8rEDz7gWKUPYIZhUYA?p=preview

  1. Yes, this is the same scope. The id's are the same, and you can see that the contents were updated.
  2. The implications of a shared scope is that it's hard to track down who changed what. I would highly recommend that your directives use an isolate scope.
  3. Feel free to manipulate the DOM. Tracking down changes will be a fun exercise... I would also highly recommend against any DOM manipulation. I would segregate DOM manipulation from other activities by wrapping them up in a directive.

One of Angular's strong points is directives, so I would use them wherever possible to separate your concerns.

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