32

Looking to leverage datetime to get the date of beginning and end of the previous week, sunday to saturday.

So, if it's 8/12/13 today, I want to define a function that prints:

Last Sunday was 8/4/2013 and last Saturday was 8/10/2013

How do I go about writing this?

EDIT: okay, so there seems to be some question about edge cases. For saturdays, I want the same week, for anything else, I'd like the calendar week immediately preceding today's date.

14
  • 2
    Why is last Sunday 8/4/2013 and not 8/11/2013? Please specify exactly the behavior that you want.
    – jason
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:17
  • I've tried messing around with timedelta, but I can't get the offset right.
    – fox
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:17
  • 1
    What's the expected output when today is Saturday, 8/10/2013?
    – jason
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:20
  • 2
    @fox: I absolutely am not. I have code almost ready to submit to you to try to help you, but you haven't precisely defined things and I want to make sure I have the edge cases right. You, however, are clearly trolling us. We are trying to help you and you insist on being obstinate.
    – jason
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:24
  • 4
    Oh, I get it, OP is assuming Sunday is the first day of the week?
    – Blorgbeard
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:25
46

datetime.date.weekday returns 0 for Monday. You need to adjust that.

Try following:

>>> import datetime
>>> today = datetime.date.today()
>>> today
datetime.date(2013, 8, 13)
>>> idx = (today.weekday() + 1) % 7 # MON = 0, SUN = 6 -> SUN = 0 .. SAT = 6
>>> idx
2
>>> sun = today - datetime.timedelta(7+idx)
>>> sat = today - datetime.timedelta(7+idx-6)
>>> 'Last Sunday was {:%m/%d/%Y} and last Saturday was {:%m/%d/%Y}'.format(sun, sat)
'Last Sunday was 08/04/2013 and last Saturday was 08/10/2013'

If you are allowed to use python-dateutil:

>>> import datetime
>>> from dateutil import relativedelta
>>> today = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> start = today - datetime.timedelta((today.weekday() + 1) % 7)
>>> sat = start + relativedelta.relativedelta(weekday=relativedelta.SA(-1))
>>> sun = sat + relativedelta.relativedelta(weekday=relativedelta.SU(-1))
>>> 'Last Sunday was {:%m/%d/%Y} and last Saturday was {:%m/%d/%Y}'.format(sun, sat)
'Last Sunday was 08/04/2013 and last Saturday was 08/10/2013'
8
  • 2
    I don't get 7+2-6. Do you mean 7+idx-6?
    – Robᵩ
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:35
  • @Robᵩ, Yes. I fixed that. Thank you for comment.
    – falsetru
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:35
  • 2
    @jderefinko isoweekday() returns 7 for Sunday.
    – falsetru
    Sep 11 '17 at 12:59
  • 2
    @Gi0rgi0s, If I understood right, OP want sunday, saturday of previous week, not the last Sunday.
    – falsetru
    Jun 30 '19 at 0:21
  • 1
    @falsetru ... ahhhh ok, makes total sense - I was confused.
    – Gi0rgi0s
    Jun 30 '19 at 1:42
12

I found the best answer from here working fine in my case

try this

from datetime import datetime,timedelta
import time

def last_day(d, day_name):
    days_of_week = ['sunday','monday','tuesday','wednesday',
                        'thursday','friday','saturday']
    target_day = days_of_week.index(day_name.lower())
    delta_day = target_day - d.isoweekday()
    if delta_day >= 0: delta_day -= 7 # go back 7 days
    return d + timedelta(days=delta_day)
2
  • unfortunately the link is down but here's an example call: last_day(datetime.today(), 'sunday')
    – oschlueter
    Aug 24 '16 at 11:43
  • @kartheek Could you elaborate what the arguments are? As the link is broken?
    – 3kstc
    Oct 11 '16 at 22:16
8
from datetime import date

def satandsun(input):
    d = input.toordinal()
    last = d - 6
    sunday = last - (last % 7)
    saturday = sunday + 6
    print date.fromordinal(sunday)
    print date.fromordinal(saturday)

Note that this seems to survive all of your cases:

>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 10))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 11))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 12))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 13))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 14))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 15))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 16))
2013-08-04
2013-08-10
>>> satandsun(date(2013, 8, 17))
2013-08-11
2013-08-17
0
5
>>> today = date.today().toordinal()
>>> lastWeek = today-7
>>> sunday = lastWeek - (lastWeek % 7)
>>> saturday = sunday + 6
>>> print "Last Sunday was %s and last Saturday was %s" % (date.fromordinal(sunday), date.fromordinal(saturday))
Last Sunday was 2013-08-04 and last Saturday was 2013-08-10
2
  • This fails the OP's spec for 8/10/2013.
    – jason
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:35
  • 1
    Yes, intentionally. It's a silly spec. What OP actually wants (distinct from what he asked for) is the beginning and end of the immediately prior week. If the current time is 11:30AM on Saturday, his odd addendum requires the current week, not the prior week.
    – Robᵩ
    Aug 13 '13 at 4:37
5

When I was dealing with this I came with this solution:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

def prior_week_end():
    return datetime.now() - timedelta(days=((datetime.now().isoweekday() + 1) % 7))

def prior_week_start():
    return prior_week_end() - timedelta(days=6)

So OP could use it as:

'Last Sunday was {:%m/%d/%Y} and last Saturday was {:%m/%d/%Y}'.format(prior_week_start(), prior_week_end())
4
import datetime

d = datetime.datetime.today()    
sat_offset = (d.weekday() - 5) % 7  
saturday = d - datetime.timedelta(days=sat_offset)    
print("Last Saturday was on", saturday)
sun_offset = (d.weekday() - 6) % 7
sunday = d - datetime.timedelta(days=sun_offset)
print("Last Sunday was on", sunday)
2

Following code works for me:

    today = datetime.date.today()
    last_sunday_offset = today.weekday() + 1  # convert day format mon-sun=0-6 => sun-sat=0-6 
    last_sunday = today - datetime.timedelta(days=last_sunday_offset)

Note: Above I have taken normal weekday(0 for Monday) but in isoweekday Monday would be 1. For more details you can check out weekday() and isoweekday() method of python built-in package datetime.py:

    def weekday(self):
        "Return day of the week, where Monday == 0 ... Sunday == 6."
        return (self.toordinal() + 6) % 7

    # Day-of-the-week and week-of-the-year, according to ISO

    def isoweekday(self):
        "Return day of the week, where Monday == 1 ... Sunday == 7."
        # 1-Jan-0001 is a Monday
        return self.toordinal() % 7 or 7```

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