174

I have two large files (sets of filenames). Roughly 30.000 lines in each file. I am trying to find a fast way of finding lines in file1 that are not present in file2.

For example, if this is file1:

line1
line2
line3

And this is file2:

line1
line4
line5

Then my result/output should be:

line2
line3

This works:

grep -v -f file2 file1

But it is very, very slow when used on my large files.

I suspect there is a good way to do this using diff(), but the output should be just the lines, nothing else, and I cannot seem to find a switch for that.

Can anyone help me find a fast way of doing this, using bash and basic linux binaries?

EDIT: To follow up on my own question, this is the best way I have found so far using diff():

diff file2 file1 | grep '^>' | sed 's/^>\ //'

Surely, there must be a better way?

10 Answers 10

171

You can achieve this by controlling the formatting of the old/new/unchanged lines in GNU diff output:

diff --new-line-format="" --unchanged-line-format=""  file1 file2

The input files should be sorted for this to work. With bash (and zsh) you can sort in-place with process substitution <( ):

diff --new-line-format="" --unchanged-line-format="" <(sort file1) <(sort file2)

In the above new and unchanged lines are suppressed, so only changed (i.e. removed lines in your case) are output. You may also use a few diff options that other solutions don't offer, such as -i to ignore case, or various whitespace options (-E, -b, -v etc) for less strict matching.


Explanation

The options --new-line-format, --old-line-format and --unchanged-line-format let you control the way diff formats the differences, similar to printf format specifiers. These options format new (added), old (removed) and unchanged lines respectively. Setting one to empty "" prevents output of that kind of line.

If you are familiar with unified diff format, you can partly recreate it with:

diff --old-line-format="-%L" --unchanged-line-format=" %L" \
     --new-line-format="+%L" file1 file2

The %L specifier is the line in question, and we prefix each with "+" "-" or " ", like diff -u (note that it only outputs differences, it lacks the --- +++ and @@ lines at the top of each grouped change). You can also use this to do other useful things like number each line with %dn.


The diff method (along with other suggestions comm and join) only produce the expected output with sorted input, though you can use <(sort ...) to sort in place. Here's a simple awk (nawk) script (inspired by the scripts linked-to in Konsolebox's answer) which accepts arbitrarily ordered input files, and outputs the missing lines in the order they occur in file1.

# output lines in file1 that are not in file2
BEGIN { FS="" }                         # preserve whitespace
(NR==FNR) { ll1[FNR]=$0; nl1=FNR; }     # file1, index by lineno
(NR!=FNR) { ss2[$0]++; }                # file2, index by string
END {
    for (ll=1; ll<=nl1; ll++) if (!(ll1[ll] in ss2)) print ll1[ll]
}

This stores the entire contents of file1 line by line in a line-number indexed array ll1[], and the entire contents of file2 line by line in a line-content indexed associative array ss2[]. After both files are read, iterate over ll1 and use the in operator to determine if the line in file1 is present in file2. (This will have have different output to the diff method if there are duplicates.)

In the event that the files are sufficiently large that storing them both causes a memory problem, you can trade CPU for memory by storing only file1 and deleting matches along the way as file2 is read.

BEGIN { FS="" }
(NR==FNR) {  # file1, index by lineno and string
  ll1[FNR]=$0; ss1[$0]=FNR; nl1=FNR;
}
(NR!=FNR) {  # file2
  if ($0 in ss1) { delete ll1[ss1[$0]]; delete ss1[$0]; }
}
END {
  for (ll=1; ll<=nl1; ll++) if (ll in ll1) print ll1[ll]
}

The above stores the entire contents of file1 in two arrays, one indexed by line number ll1[], one indexed by line content ss1[]. Then as file2 is read, each matching line is deleted from ll1[] and ss1[]. At the end the remaining lines from file1 are output, preserving the original order.

In this case, with the problem as stated, you can also divide and conquer using GNU split (filtering is a GNU extension), repeated runs with chunks of file1 and reading file2 completely each time:

split -l 20000 --filter='gawk -f linesnotin.awk - file2' < file1

Note the use and placement of - meaning stdin on the gawk command line. This is provided by split from file1 in chunks of 20000 line per-invocation.

For users on non-GNU systems, there is almost certainly a GNU coreutils package you can obtain, including on OSX as part of the Apple Xcode tools which provides GNU diff, awk, though only a POSIX/BSD split rather than a GNU version.

  • 1
    This does exactly what I need, in a tiny fraction of the time taken by the enormous grep. Thanks! – Niels2000 Aug 13 '13 at 9:47
  • 1
    Found this gnu manpage – Juto Aug 13 '13 at 14:06
  • some of us aren't on gnu [OS X bsd here...] :) – rogerdpack Feb 27 '15 at 15:01
  • 1
    I assume you mean for diff: in general the input files will be different, 1 is returned by diff in that case. Consider it a bonus ;-) If you're testing in a shell script 0 and 1 are expected exit codes, 2 indicates a problem. – mr.spuratic Nov 2 '18 at 17:27
  • 1
    @mr.spuratic ah yeah, now I find it in the man diff. Thanks! – Archeosudoerus Nov 2 '18 at 19:17
178

The comm command (short for "common") may be useful comm - compare two sorted files line by line

#find lines only in file1
comm -23 file1 file2 

#find lines only in file2
comm -13 file1 file2 

#find lines common to both files
comm -12 file1 file2 

The man file is actually quite readable for this.

  • 4
    Works flawlessly on OSX. – pisaruk Jun 28 '16 at 21:27
  • 22
    The requirement for sorted input should perhaps be highlighted. – tripleee Apr 18 '17 at 4:55
  • 11
    comm also has an option to verify input is sorted, --check-order (which it seems to do anyway, but this option will cause it to error instead of continue). But to sort the files, simply do: com -23 <(sort file1) <(sort file2) and so on – michael Nov 7 '17 at 6:00
  • This is the most elegant answer! – Frank-Rene Schäfer May 10 at 7:57
19

Like konsolebox suggested, the posters grep solution

grep -v -f file2 file1

actually works great (fast) if you simply add the -F option, to treat the patterns as fixed strings instead of regular expressions. I verified this on a pair of ~1000 line file lists I had to compare. With -F it took 0.031 s (real), while without it took 2.278 s (real), when redirecting grep output to wc -l.

These tests also included the -x switch, which are necessary part of the solution in order to ensure totally accuracy in cases where file2 contains lines which match part of, but not all of, one or more lines in file1.

So a solution that does not require the inputs to be sorted, is fast, flexible (case sensitivity, etc) and also (I think) works on any POSIX system is:

grep -F -x -v -f file2 file1
  • Yeah, it works but even with -F this doesn't scale well. – Molomby Sep 28 '16 at 4:11
  • this is not that fast, I waited 5 minutes for 2 files of ~500k lines before giving up – cahen Jan 6 '17 at 16:22
  • actually, this way is still slower than comm way, because this one can handle unsorted files hence dragged down by unsorting, comm takes the advantage of sorting – hylepo May 23 '18 at 8:14
10

whats the speed of as sort and diff?

sort file1 -u > file1.sorted
sort file2 -u > file2.sorted
diff file1.sorted file2.sorted
  • 1
    Thanks for reminding me about the need to sort the files before doing diff. sort + diff is MUCH faster. – Niels2000 Aug 13 '13 at 9:48
  • 3
    one liner ;-) diff <(sort file1 -u) <(sort file2 -u) – steveinatorx Sep 13 '16 at 22:18
5
$ join -v 1 -t '' file1 file2
line2
line3

The -t makes sure that it compares the whole line, if you had a space in some of the lines.

  • Like comm, join requires both input lines to be sorted on the field you are performing the join operation on. – tripleee Apr 18 '17 at 4:55
5

If you're short of "fancy tools", e.g. in some minimal Linux distribution, there is a solution with just cat, sort and uniq:

cat includes.txt excludes.txt excludes.txt | sort | uniq --unique

Test:

seq 1 1 7 | sort --random-sort > includes.txt
seq 3 1 9 | sort --random-sort > excludes.txt
cat includes.txt excludes.txt excludes.txt | sort | uniq --unique

# Output:
1
2    

This is also relatively fast, compared to grep.

  • Note -- some implementations will not recognize the --unique option. You should be able to use the standardized POSIX option for this: | uniq -u – AndrewF Apr 10 at 2:49
2

Using of fgrep or adding -F option to grep could help. But for faster calculations you could use Awk.

You could try one of these Awk methods:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/grep-for-huge-files-826030/#post4066219

  • 1
    +1 This is the only answer which doesn't require inputs to be sorted. While apparently the OP was happy with that requirement, it is an unacceptable constraint in many real-world scenarios. – tripleee Nov 6 '14 at 9:16
2

You can use Python:

python -c '
lines_to_remove = set()
with open("file2", "r") as f:
    for line in f.readlines():
        lines_to_remove.add(line.strip())

with open("f1", "r") as f:
    for line in f.readlines():
        if line.strip() not in lines_to_remove:
            print(line.strip())
'
1

The way I usually do this is using the --suppress-common-lines flag, though note that this only works if your do it in side-by-side format.

diff -y --suppress-common-lines file1.txt file2.txt

-1

I found that for me using a normal if and for loop statement worked perfectly.

for i in $(cat file2);do if [ $(grep -i $i file1) ];then echo "$i found" >>Matching_lines.txt;else echo "$i missing" >>missing_lines.txt ;fi;done
  • 2
    See DontReadLinesWithFor. Also, this code will behave very badly if any of your grep results expand to multiple words, or if any of your file2 entries can be treated by the shell as a glob. – Charles Duffy Jul 11 '18 at 18:05

protected by codeforester Aug 30 '18 at 17:34

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