I have a web service that receives data in JSON format, processes the data, and then returns the result to the requester.

I want to measure the request, response, and total time using cURL.

My example request looks like:

curl -X POST -d @file server:port

and I currently measure this using the time command in Linux:

time curl -X POST -d @file server:port

The time command only measures total time, though - which isn't quite what I am looking for.

Is there any way to measure request and response times using cURL?

10 Answers 10

up vote 1203 down vote accepted
+100

From this brilliant blog post... https://blog.josephscott.org/2011/10/14/timing-details-with-curl/

cURL supports formatted output for the details of the request (see the cURL manpage for details, under -w, –write-out <format>). For our purposes we’ll focus just on the timing details that are provided.

  1. Create a new file, curl-format.txt, and paste in:

        time_namelookup:  %{time_namelookup}\n
           time_connect:  %{time_connect}\n
        time_appconnect:  %{time_appconnect}\n
       time_pretransfer:  %{time_pretransfer}\n
          time_redirect:  %{time_redirect}\n
     time_starttransfer:  %{time_starttransfer}\n
                        ----------\n
             time_total:  %{time_total}\n
    
  2. Make a request:

    curl -w "@curl-format.txt" -o /dev/null -s "http://wordpress.com/"
    

    Or on Windows, it's...

    curl -w "@curl-format.txt" -o NUL -s "http://wordpress.com/"
    


What this does:

-w "@curl-format.txt" tells cURL to use our format file
-o /dev/null redirects the output of the request to /dev/null
-s tells cURL not to show a progress meter
"http://wordpress.com/" is the URL we are requesting. Use quotes particularly if your URL has "&" query string parameters


And here is what you get back:

   time_namelookup:  0.001
      time_connect:  0.037
   time_appconnect:  0.000
  time_pretransfer:  0.037
     time_redirect:  0.000
time_starttransfer:  0.092
                   ----------
        time_total:  0.164


Make a Windows shortcut (aka BAT file)

Put this command in CURLTIME.BAT (in the same folder as curl.exe)

curl -w "@%~dp0curl-format.txt" -o NUL -s %*

Then you can simply call...

curltime wordpress.org
  • 15
    awesome answer. thank you. one thing that i had to do was adding \n to break the line in the text file – Jason Kim May 2 '14 at 19:51
  • 1
    In the windows BAT file it only sends the first parameter, change to this to pass all parameters and to disable echo the command it self: @curl -w "@%~dp0curl-format.txt" -o NUL -s %* Great answer – padilo Oct 1 '14 at 15:52
  • Thanks @udoh, I've updated the answer to include that. – Simon East Oct 2 '14 at 1:09
  • excellent answer. how do i also include the current date+time of when the curl initiated the request? – Saqib Ali Dec 13 '14 at 16:25
  • hey! I know this answer was made a long time ago... the information was really useful but I have a doubt... when @SimonEast show what you get with the command... the numbers are fixed, right? because I am using the same command and if I add all the times is not equal to the time_total – hdlopez Jul 14 '16 at 21:09

Here is the answer:

curl -X POST -d @file server:port -w %{time_connect}:%{time_starttransfer}:%{time_total}

All of the variables used with -w can be found in man curl.

  • 10
    It is better for user experience to add new lines: "\n%{time_connect}:%{time_starttransfer}:%{time_total}\n" – Sergei Kurenkov Feb 3 '17 at 12:35
  • For me it was not working without quotes. I would suggest adding quotes while specifying the format /h/a/c/haproxy # ❯❯❯ curl -w "%{time_total}\n" google.com -o /dev/null -s 0.055 – Geek Feb 23 '17 at 12:11
  • @Geek It generally makes sense to show errors when operating in silent mode (-sS). – x-yuri May 3 at 20:19

Option 1. To measure response time with curl, use the following command:

curl -o /dev/null -s -w 'Total: %{time_total}\n'  https://www.google.com

Sample output:

enter image description here

Option 2. To get more details, use the following command:

curl -o /dev/null -s -w 'Connect: %{time_connect}\nStart Transfer: %{time_starttransfer}\nTotal: %{time_total}\n'  https://www.google.com

Sample output:

enter image description here

Ref: Get response time with curl

A shortcut you can add to your .bashrc etc, based on other answers here:

function perf {
  curl -o /dev/null -s -w "%{time_connect} + %{time_starttransfer} = %{time_total}\n" "$1"
}

Usage:

> perf stackoverflow.com
0.521 + 0.686 = 1.290
  • 5
    I use a variation that displays the number of bytes downloaded during the measured time: curl -o /dev/null -s -w "time_total: %{time_total} sec\nsize_download: %{size_download} bytes\n" https://www.google.com – jambroseclarke Jul 23 '15 at 19:40

The following is inspired by Simon's answer. It's self-contained (doesn't require a separate format file), which makes it great for inclusion into .bashrc.

curl_time() {
    curl -so /dev/null -w "\
   namelookup:  %{time_namelookup}s\n\
      connect:  %{time_connect}s\n\
   appconnect:  %{time_appconnect}s\n\
  pretransfer:  %{time_pretransfer}s\n\
     redirect:  %{time_redirect}s\n\
starttransfer:  %{time_starttransfer}s\n\
-------------------------\n\
        total:  %{time_total}s\n" "$@"
}

Futhermore, it should work with all arguments that curl normally takes, since the "$@" just passes them through. For example, you can do:

curl_time -X POST -H "Content-Type: application/json" -d '{"key": "val"}' https://postman-echo.com/post

Output:

   namelookup:  0,125000s
      connect:  0,250000s
   appconnect:  0,609000s
  pretransfer:  0,609000s
     redirect:  0,000000s
starttransfer:  0,719000s
-------------------------
        total:  0,719000s
  • 2
    This is convenient - thank you! – ankr Aug 22 at 9:10

If you want to analyze or summarize the latency you can try apache bench:

ab -n [number of samples] [url]

For example:

ab -n 100 http://www.google.com/

It will show:

This is ApacheBench, Version 2.3 <$Revision: 1757674 $>
Copyright 1996 Adam Twiss, Zeus Technology Ltd, http://www.zeustech.net/
Licensed to The Apache Software Foundation, http://www.apache.org/

Benchmarking www.google.com (be patient).....done


Server Software:        gws
Server Hostname:        www.google.com
Server Port:            80

Document Path:          /
Document Length:        12419 bytes

Concurrency Level:      1
Time taken for tests:   10.700 seconds
Complete requests:      100
Failed requests:        97
   (Connect: 0, Receive: 0, Length: 97, Exceptions: 0)
Total transferred:      1331107 bytes
HTML transferred:       1268293 bytes
Requests per second:    9.35 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       107.004 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       107.004 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          121.48 [Kbytes/sec] received

Connection Times (ms)
              min  mean[+/-sd] median   max
Connect:       20   22   0.8     22      26
Processing:    59   85 108.7     68     911
Waiting:       59   85 108.7     67     910
Total:         80  107 108.8     90     932

Percentage of the requests served within a certain time (ms)
  50%     90
  66%     91
  75%     93
  80%     95
  90%    105
  95%    111
  98%    773
  99%    932
 100%    932 (longest request)

I made a friendly formatter for sniffing curl requests to help with debugging ( see comments for usage ). It contains's every known output parameter you can write out in an easy to read format.

https://gist.github.com/manifestinteractive/ce8dec10dcb4725b8513

Hey is better than Apache Bench, has fewer issues with SSL

./hey https://google.com -more
Summary:
  Total:    3.0960 secs
  Slowest:  1.6052 secs
  Fastest:  0.4063 secs
  Average:  0.6773 secs
  Requests/sec: 64.5992

Response time histogram:
  0.406 [1] |
  0.526 [142]   |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
  0.646 [1] |
  0.766 [6] |∎∎
  0.886 [0] |
  1.006 [0] |
  1.126 [0] |
  1.246 [12]    |∎∎∎
  1.365 [32]    |∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎∎
  1.485 [5] |∎
  1.605 [1] |

Latency distribution:
  10% in 0.4265 secs
  25% in 0.4505 secs
  50% in 0.4838 secs
  75% in 1.2181 secs
  90% in 1.2869 secs
  95% in 1.3384 secs
  99% in 1.4085 secs

Details (average, fastest, slowest):
  DNS+dialup:    0.1150 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.4849 secs
  DNS-lookup:    0.0032 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0319 secs
  req write:     0.0001 secs, 0.0000 secs, 0.0007 secs
  resp wait:     0.2068 secs, 0.1690 secs, 0.4906 secs
  resp read:     0.0117 secs, 0.0011 secs, 0.2375 secs

Status code distribution:
  [200] 200 responses
  • That's nice. 'hey' also happens to be impossible to google. – labyrinth Nov 21 at 16:11

Another option that is perhaps the simplest one in terms of the command line is adding the built-in --trace-time option:

curl -X POST -d @file server:port --trace-time

Even though it technically does not output the timings of the various steps as requested by the OP, it does display the timestamps for all steps of the request as shown below. Using this, you can (fairly easily) calculate how long each step has taken.

$ curl https://www.google.com --trace-time -v -o /dev/null
13:29:11.148734 * Rebuilt URL to: https://www.google.com/
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     013:29:11.149958 *   Trying 172.217.20.36...
13:29:11.149993 * TCP_NODELAY set
13:29:11.163177 * Connected to www.google.com (172.217.20.36) port 443 (#0)
13:29:11.164768 * ALPN, offering h2
13:29:11.164804 * ALPN, offering http/1.1
13:29:11.164833 * successfully set certificate verify locations:
13:29:11.164863 *   CAfile: none
  CApath: /etc/ssl/certs
13:29:11.165046 } [5 bytes data]
13:29:11.165099 * (304) (OUT), TLS handshake, Client hello (1):
13:29:11.165128 } [512 bytes data]
13:29:11.189518 * (304) (IN), TLS handshake, Server hello (2):
13:29:11.189537 { [100 bytes data]
13:29:11.189628 * TLSv1.2 (IN), TLS handshake, Certificate (11):
13:29:11.189658 { [2104 bytes data]
13:29:11.190243 * TLSv1.2 (IN), TLS handshake, Server key exchange (12):
13:29:11.190277 { [115 bytes data]
13:29:11.190507 * TLSv1.2 (IN), TLS handshake, Server finished (14):
13:29:11.190539 { [4 bytes data]
13:29:11.190770 * TLSv1.2 (OUT), TLS handshake, Client key exchange (16):
13:29:11.190797 } [37 bytes data]
13:29:11.190890 * TLSv1.2 (OUT), TLS change cipher, Client hello (1):
13:29:11.190915 } [1 bytes data]
13:29:11.191023 * TLSv1.2 (OUT), TLS handshake, Finished (20):
13:29:11.191053 } [16 bytes data]
13:29:11.204324 * TLSv1.2 (IN), TLS handshake, Finished (20):
13:29:11.204358 { [16 bytes data]
13:29:11.204417 * SSL connection using TLSv1.2 / ECDHE-ECDSA-CHACHA20-POLY1305
13:29:11.204451 * ALPN, server accepted to use h2
13:29:11.204483 * Server certificate:
13:29:11.204520 *  subject: C=US; ST=California; L=Mountain View; O=Google LLC; CN=www.google.com
13:29:11.204555 *  start date: Oct  2 07:29:00 2018 GMT
13:29:11.204585 *  expire date: Dec 25 07:29:00 2018 GMT
13:29:11.204623 *  subjectAltName: host "www.google.com" matched cert's "www.google.com"
13:29:11.204663 *  issuer: C=US; O=Google Trust Services; CN=Google Internet Authority G3
13:29:11.204701 *  SSL certificate verify ok.
13:29:11.204754 * Using HTTP2, server supports multi-use
13:29:11.204795 * Connection state changed (HTTP/2 confirmed)
13:29:11.204840 * Copying HTTP/2 data in stream buffer to connection buffer after upgrade: len=0
13:29:11.204881 } [5 bytes data]
13:29:11.204983 * Using Stream ID: 1 (easy handle 0x55846ef24520)
13:29:11.205034 } [5 bytes data]
13:29:11.205104 > GET / HTTP/2
13:29:11.205104 > Host: www.google.com
13:29:11.205104 > User-Agent: curl/7.61.0
13:29:11.205104 > Accept: */*
13:29:11.205104 > 
13:29:11.218116 { [5 bytes data]
13:29:11.218173 * Connection state changed (MAX_CONCURRENT_STREAMS == 100)!
13:29:11.218211 } [5 bytes data]
13:29:11.251936 < HTTP/2 200 
13:29:11.251962 < date: Fri, 19 Oct 2018 10:29:11 GMT
13:29:11.251998 < expires: -1
13:29:11.252046 < cache-control: private, max-age=0
13:29:11.252085 < content-type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
13:29:11.252119 < p3p: CP="This is not a P3P policy! See g.co/p3phelp for more info."
13:29:11.252160 < server: gws
13:29:11.252198 < x-xss-protection: 1; mode=block
13:29:11.252228 < x-frame-options: SAMEORIGIN
13:29:11.252262 < set-cookie: 1P_JAR=2018-10-19-10; expires=Sun, 18-Nov-2018 10:29:11 GMT; path=/; domain=.google.com
13:29:11.252297 < set-cookie: NID=141=pzXxp1jrJmLwFVl9bLMPFdGCtG8ySQKxB2rlDWgerrKJeXxfdmB1HhJ1UXzX-OaFQcnR1A9LKYxi__PWMigjMBQHmI3xkU53LI_TsYRbkMNJNdxs-caQQ7fEcDGE694S; expires=Sat, 20-Apr-2019 10:29:11 GMT; path=/; domain=.google.com; HttpOnly
13:29:11.252336 < alt-svc: quic=":443"; ma=2592000; v="44,43,39,35"
13:29:11.252368 < accept-ranges: none
13:29:11.252408 < vary: Accept-Encoding
13:29:11.252438 < 
13:29:11.252473 { [5 bytes data]
100 12215    0 12215    0     0   112k      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--  112k
13:29:11.255674 * Connection #0 to host www.google.com left intact
  • This is actually a great answer which is probably going to fit most of the use-cases people here are looking for. The other answers are great for thorough, in-depth solutions, but this is good for quickly checking round-trip times. – Chris Vandevelde Oct 29 at 17:33
  • Thanks @ChrisVandevelde. Yeah, I was aware that there was "something" like this (had used this parameter before), then I googled my way to this SO post and found the more sophisticated form, but... I had a feeling there was another way also. :) Like you say, it's kind of neat in its simplicity and is sometimes well enough for simpler use cases. – Per Lundberg Oct 30 at 9:06

Here's a Bash one-liner to hit the same server repeatedly:

for i in {1..1000}; do curl -s -o /dev/null -w "%{time_total}\n" http://server/get_things; done

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