9

I googled, but didn't find a clear answer. Example:

class Foo {
public:
    operator void* () {
         return ptr;
    }

private:
    void *ptr;
};

I understand what void* operator() is. Is the above operator the same thing in a different syntax? If not, what is it? And how can I use that operator to get the ptr?

5
  • Note that your current code has a typo, opeator lacks an r – StephenTG Aug 13 '13 at 17:48
  • @StephenTG Thanks. Modified – GuLearn Aug 13 '13 at 17:49
  • 1
    It's a cast operator. ideone.com/k1EiJF – Chad Aug 13 '13 at 17:51
  • 1
    @Chad - it's a conversion operator. Some conversions are done with a cast, some are not. – Pete Becker Aug 13 '13 at 20:53
  • This might be an attempt at the Safe Bool Idiom. See artima.com/cppsource/safebool2.html – Mark Ransom Aug 13 '13 at 21:34
15

No they are two different operators. The operator void* function is a type casting function, while operator() is a function call operator.

The first is used when you want to convert an instance of Foo to a void*, like e.g.

Foo foo;
void* ptr = foo;  // The compiler will call `operator void*` here

The second is used as a function:

Foo foo;
void* ptr = foo();  // The compiler calls `operator()` here
3
  • So operator() can be implemented to provide callable objects? – JAB Aug 13 '13 at 17:49
  • Will that enable implicit conversion? e.g. Can I safely pass Foo to a function like void bar ([anytype]) if I implement operator [anytype]() in Foo? – GuLearn Aug 13 '13 at 18:03
  • 1
    @YZ.learner Besides the implicit casting in the specification (like short to int etc.) you can get implicit casting two other ways: By having the "destination" class contain a non-explicit constructor taking the "source" type, or by having a casting operator like in your example. – Some programmer dude Aug 14 '13 at 5:58
5

That function defines what happens when the object is converted to a void pointer, here it evaluates to the address the member ptr points to.

It is sometimes useful to define this conversion function, e.g. for boolean evaluation of the object.

Here's an example:

#include <iostream>

struct Foo {
    Foo() : ptr(0) {
        std::cout << "I'm this: " << this << "\n";
    }
    operator void* () {
        std::cout << "Here, I look like this: " << ptr << "\n";
        return ptr;
    }
private:
    void *ptr;
};

int main() {
    Foo foo;
    // convert to void*
    (void*)foo;
    // as in:
    if (foo) { // boolean evaluation using the void* conversion
        std::cout << "test succeeded\n";
    }
    else {
        std::cout << "test failed\n";
    }
}

The output is:

$ g++ test.cc && ./a.out
I'm this: 0x7fff6072a540
Here, I look like this: 0
Here, I look like this: 0
test failed

See also:

1
  • "otherwise it'd be the address of the object itself, this." -- No, it wouldn't. I think you're confusing the object with a pointer to the object. – user743382 Aug 13 '13 at 17:50
1

It's a type conversion operator. It is used whenever an object of class Foo is casted (converted) to void*. It is indeed not the same as void* operator().

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.