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I need the actual algorithm used by Oracle's DBMS_UTILITY.get_hash_value function. I need to be able to generate this information without access to an Oracle database.

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    When you're talking about hashing functions, you need to specify for what purpose - e.g. is it for detecting duplicates, spreading data evenly, or is it for a cryptographic application? – Jeffrey Kemp Aug 14 '13 at 5:04
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    I appreciate the help, but I don't really see the relevance of why...not to mention the fact that I think that, in this case, it would violate my NDA to disclose that fact. I'm being asked to develop a tool that needs to replicate Oracle's hash function...isn't that reason enough? – Dan Forbes Aug 14 '13 at 22:24
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    I don't really think that's a fair representation of what I asked, though. I'm asking for a very specific algorithm - the DBMS_UTILITY.GET_HASH_VALUE algorithm. I know I'm not the only person who would be interested in this (see, forums.oracle.com/thread/1528240). I understand it's important to be clear in your questions, but I don't see where I failed to do that. – Dan Forbes Aug 15 '13 at 3:49
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    Voting to reopen based on clarified requirements. – Jeffrey Kemp Aug 15 '13 at 3:56
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    The actual situation is that, I am told, I do not have access to an Oracle database, but that I need to be able get the mapping of String -> DBMS_UTILITY.GET_HASH_VALUE. – Dan Forbes Aug 15 '13 at 3:56
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Oracle doesn't detail the implementation of the hash, and Tom Kyte has indicated that the implementation can change release to release. If you are looking for a hash function you can use in Java and Oracle, you can do SHA1 (and other) hashes using sys.dbms_crypto.hash in oracle, and MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-1") (for details see this question - Java String to SHA1).

If you need to use the same algorithim as Oracle's GET_HASH_VALUE, perhaps contacting Oracle support may help...

  • it's a hash function, of course it's going to get collisions! (note -how likely this is depends on what hash size you choose) – Jeffrey Kemp Aug 14 '13 at 5:02
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    Yeah, but no one has yet found two messages that give a collision on an SHA-1 hash. For purposes of identifying a unique record or differences between two records based on typical database data, SHA1 should suffice. There's always SHA-256. stackoverflow.com/questions/3475648/sha1-collision-demo-example – N West Aug 14 '13 at 13:56
  • You said "people have found collisions often with it" as if that indicated an inherant fault in its implementation. I felt that was a bit unfair. Also, you are making the assumption that the OP needs a hash that identifies unique records/differences between two records - an assumption which, I believe, is unwarranted given the lack of detail in the question. Note, however, I'm not downvoting your answer. – Jeffrey Kemp Aug 15 '13 at 2:27
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    @Dan Forbes, Per Tom Kyte, the implementation detail of that function is not available, and may change between versions of the Oracle database. asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/… We change the hash algorithm from release to release (it has happened at least once in the past and could happen again). You need to look at alternative ways. – N West Aug 15 '13 at 13:20
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    @JeffreyKemp Agreed. I did assume that the need for a hash was in related to the records - I updated my answer to be a more general reason not to use it. – N West Aug 15 '13 at 13:22

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