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After some help as have some code which works but trying to fully understand a small section which uses a lookup table as part of a state machine. The state machine I understand and have been using for a tutorial I am writing found here http://coder-tronics.com/state-machine-tutorial-pt1 Instead of using more switch case statements inside the UponExit, UponEnter and ActionWhileInState, someone suggested using this method which I like but don't fully understand.

Now the part I am unsure about is these lines to do with the typedef and lookup table

typedef void (* const voidFunc)(void);

voidFunc UponEnter[S_MAX] =          {hEnter_OFF,   hEnter_ON,   hEnter_PROCESS};
voidFunc ActionWhileInState[S_MAX] = {hInState_OFF, hInState_ON, hInState_PROCESS};
voidFunc UponExit[S_MAX] =           {hExit_OFF,    hExit_ON,    hExit_PROCESS};

I looked up typedef and lookup tables and have a basic understanding, but was hoping someone could give a brief walk through of how this works in this case?

The full part of code this relates to is below for completeness.

enum states { S_OFF, S_ON, S_PROCESS, S_MAX };
enum events { E_OFF, E_ON, E_START, E_MAX};
typedef void (* const voidFunc)(void);
void hEnter_OFF(void);   void hEnter_ON(void);   void hEnter_PROCESS(void);
void hInState_OFF(void); void hInState_ON(void); void hInState_PROCESS(void);
void hExit_OFF(void);    void hExit_ON(void);    void hExit_PROCESS(void);

voidFunc UponEnter[S_MAX] =          {hEnter_OFF,   hEnter_ON,   hEnter_PROCESS};
voidFunc ActionWhileInState[S_MAX] = {hInState_OFF, hInState_ON, hInState_PROCESS};
voidFunc UponExit[S_MAX] =           {hExit_OFF,    hExit_ON,    hExit_PROCESS};

enum states StateMachine(enum events event, enum states Current_State)
{
    int Next_State = Current_State;

    switch ( Current_State )
    {
            case S_OFF:
       switch (event )
       {
           // A transition to the next state will occur here
           case E_ON:
            Next_State = S_ON;
               break;
           default:     // Default case placed here to avoid Eclipse warnings as Eclipse expects
               break;   //to handle all enumerated values
       }
       break;
   case S_ON:
       switch (event )
       {
           // A transition to the next state will occur here
           case E_OFF:
            Next_State = S_OFF;
               break;
           case E_START:
            Next_State = S_PROCESS;
               break;
           default:     // Default case placed here to avoid Eclipse warnings as Eclipse expects
               break;   //to handle all enumerated values
       }
       break;
   case S_PROCESS:
       switch (event )
       {
           // A transition to the next state will occur here
       case E_OFF:
        Next_State = S_OFF;
           break;
       default:     // Default case placed here to avoid Eclipse warnings as Eclipse expects
           break;   //to handle all enumerated values
       }
       break;
       // The program should never arrive here
    default:
       break;
    }

    if (Next_State != Current_State)
    {
        // Function call for Upon Exit function, it can be omitted but allows extra functionality
        UponExit[Current_State]();
        // Function call for Upon Enter function, it can be omitted but allows extra functionality
        if (Next_State != S_MAX) UponEnter[Next_State]();
    }
    else // I think ActionWhileInState should only be called when NOT doing a transition!
     {
        if ( event != E_MAX) ActionWhileInState[Current_State]();
    }
    return Next_State;
}

Thanks,

Ant

1 Answer 1

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typedef void (* const voidFunc)(void);

is a typedef for a function pointer (for a pointer to a function expecting no parameters and not returning anything to be exact). So your arrays

voidFunc UponEnter[S_MAX] =          {hEnter_OFF,   hEnter_ON,   hEnter_PROCESS};
voidFunc ActionWhileInState[S_MAX] = {hInState_OFF, hInState_ON, hInState_PROCESS}; 
voidFunc UponExit[S_MAX] =           {hExit_OFF,    hExit_ON,    hExit_PROCESS};

Each hold three different function pointers, one for each state. So a line like

UponExit[Current_State]();

calls the function the pointer UponExit[Current_State] points to which is hExit_OFF if Current_State is 0, hExit_ON if Current_State is 1 or hExit_PROCESS if Current_State is 2. You could also write the line like that:

(*UponExit[Current_State])();

What looks more complicated but makes clear that UponExit[Current_State] is a function pointer that is "dereferenced" to a call to the function it points to.

Edit:

You have an enum for your states:

enum states { S_OFF, S_ON, S_PROCESS, S_MAX };

Thus, S_OFF == 0, S_ON == 1, S_PROCESS == 2 and S_MAX == 3 (look here)

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  • Hi Ingo, thanks for the prompt response. This has helped but admit to still being a little confused, but would I be correct in saying if we look at the switch case for the statemachine function, the first case S_OFF as = 0, then S_ON as = 1 and finally S_PROCESS as = 2.
    – Ant
    Aug 14, 2013 at 15:13
  • Ingo, thanks again going to mark your response as the answer but had one last question. Where voidFunc UponEnter[S_MAX] = {hEnter_OFF, hEnter_ON, hEnter_PPROCESS}; Is S_MAX used here as this is the default returned value, if another value is not returned
    – Ant
    Aug 14, 2013 at 16:14
  • @Ant: no it isn't. The declaration only means that UponEntry consists of S_MAX elements, indexed by 0 to S_MAX-1. If you tried to access UponEntry[S_MAX] (or UponEntry [i] for any i < 0 or >= S_MAX) that would be undefined behaviour an most likely result in a crash Aug 14, 2013 at 17:00
  • Ingo thanks so S_MAX is like the end value when declaring an array?
    – Ant
    Aug 14, 2013 at 19:02
  • It's the array size (the number of elements). It just declares hoy much memory is used for the array and has got nothing to do with the contents of any array element. Aug 15, 2013 at 9:25

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